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FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>
Jeffrey A. Engelman, MD, PhD

Jeffrey A. Engelman, MD, PhD
Director, Center for Thoracic Cancers Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Dr. Engelman is the director of thoracic oncology at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, the director of molecular therapeutics at the MGH Cancer Center, the scientific director for the Termeer Center for Targeted Therapies, and the Laurel Schwartz Professor of Oncology at Harvard Medical School. For the past 10 years, Dr. Engelman has been instrumental in understanding sensitivity and resistance to targeted therapies in lung cancer. Dr. Engelman has been at the leading edge of translational research advancing targeted therapies to benefit patients with cancer. His research has revealed the mechanisms by which genetically defined subsets of lung cancer acquire resistance to targeted therapies. These laboratory findings have led to new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of EGFR and ALK cancers that have become resistant to first line kinase inhibitors. This research has been pivotal to the development of new therapies, including the development of ceritinib for ALK cancers and combination therapies, such as EGFR and MET inhibitors, to overcome resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Dr. Engelman has also developed novel therapeutic approaches for KRAS mutant lung cancer and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer that are currently being developed in the clinic. In his multiple leadership roles at the MGH Cancer Center, Dr. Engelman leads the translational research programs of the thoracic oncology team and the phase I program at the MGH Cancer Center. These programs integrate laboratory studies, clinical trials, and comprehensive molecular analyses of cancers to pioneer individualized therapies. His team has also established a well-developed translational infrastructure that has culminated in a seamless bench-to-bedside connection. His lab has developed methods to generate early passage cell cultures from core needle biopsies of interest that can be interrogated with high-throughput drug combination screens to identify new therapeutic strategies. Many of these same cutting-edge technologies are now being applied to the field of immunotherapy.