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FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>

AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics: Discovery, Biology, and Clinical Applications

Program

Thursday, October 26

Friday, October 27

Saturday, October 28

Sunday, October 29

Monday, October 30

Thursday,October 26   

Registration  
3:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.


Friday, October 27 

Registration
7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Continental Breakfast
8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

Educational Session: Molecular Tumor Boards 
9:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Session Cochairs: Elaine R. Mardis, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, and Josep Tabernero, Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain

Leveraging the power of collaboration in a genomics tumor board: None of us is as smart as all of us
Janessa Laskin, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada

MSK-IMPACT: Tumor/normal sequencing to guide diagnosis, treatment selection, and clinical trial enrollment
Michael F. Berger, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

Molecular tumor boards: Promise and reality
Elena Garralda, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain

Break
10:30 a.m.-10:50 a.m.

Spotlight on Proffered Papers Session 1  
10:50 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Session Cochairs: James L. Gulley, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, and Charles Swanton, The Francis Crick Institute and UCL Cancer Institute, London, England

Characterization of antitumor activity of TAS6417, a novel EGFR-TKI targeting exon 20 insertions1, 2
Shinichi Hasako, Taiho Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tsukuba, Japan

EGFR-CD3 bispecific Probody™ therapeutic induces tumor regressions and increases maximum tolerated dose >60-fold in preclinical studies1, 2
Leila Boustany, CytomX Therapeutics, Redwood City, California

Neratinib has clinical activity in HER2-amplified breast cancer patients with tumors that have acquired activating mutations in HER21, 2
Maurizio Scaltriti, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

Loss of the lysosomal transporter SLC46A3 is a mechanism for innate and acquired resistance to non-cleavable maytansine and pyrrolobenzodiazepine-based antibody- drug conjugates1, 2
Krista Kinneer, Medimmune, Inc., Gaithersburg, Maryland

AG-120 (ivosidenib), a first-in-class mutant IDH1 inhibitor, promotes morphologic changes and upregulates liver-specific genes in IDH1 mutant cholangiocarcinoma1, 2
Vikram Deshpande, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

Phase 1 study of the EZH2 inhibitor, tazemetostat, in children with relapsed or refractory INI1-negative tumors including rhabdoid tumors, epithelioid sarcoma, chordoma, and synovial sarcoma1, 2
Susan N. Chi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

First in human, dose escalation trial of the combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, and navitoclax in patients with BRAF mutant solid tumors1, 2
Ryan J. Sullivan, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

Preliminary results from a phase 2 proof of concept trial of tipifarnib in tumors with HRAS mutations1, 2
Alan L. Ho, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

Durable responses observed in recurrent high-grade glioma (rHGG) with Toca 511 and Toca FC treatment1, 2
Clark Chen, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Lunch on own

12:20 p.m.-1:45 p.m.

AACR Chemistry in Cancer Research (CICR) Town Hall
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

AACR Women in Cancer Research (WICR) Professional Advancement Session
12:30 p.m.-1:30 p.m. 

Welcome and Opening Remarks 
1:50 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

  • Antoni Ribas, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California
  • James L. Gulley, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
  • Charles Swanton, The Francis Crick Institute and UCL Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom

Keynote Lectures
2:00 p.m.-4:10 p.m.

PI 3-kinase links obesity, insulin resistance, and cancer
Lewis C. Cantley, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York

T cell recognition of human cancer
Ton Schumacher, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Cell transfer immunotherapy targeting unique somatic mutations in cancer
Steven A. Rosenberg, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Break
4:10 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

Plenary Session 1: Acquired Resistance to Checkpoint   Inhibitors
4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.
Session Cochairs: Alberto Bardelli, University of Turin School of Medicine / IRCCS, Candiolo, Italy, and Antoni Ribas, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

Resistance to PD-1 blockade in melanoma
Antoni Ribas

Resistance to PD-1 blockade in MSI-H tumors
Luis A. Diaz, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

Genomic and neoantigen landscape of response and resistance to immune checkpoint blockade
Victor E. Velculescu, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

Inactivation of DNA repair to improve immune surveillance
Alberto Bardelli

Spotlight on Proffered Papers Session 2: Immunogenomics and Response to Immunotherapy   
6:30 p.m.-7:15 p.m.
Session Chair: Antoni Ribas, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

Allele specific HLA loss and immune escape in lung cancer evolution1, 2
Rachel Rosenthal, University College London, London, England

Immunoediting in untreated mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer1, 2
Antoni Ribas, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

Prediction of clinical outcomes of cancer patients treated with anti‑PD‑1/PD‑L1 using a radiomics-based imaging score of immune infiltrate1, 2
Roger Sun, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France

Opening Reception
7:15 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

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Saturday, October 28 

Continental Breakfast
7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Registration
7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 2: Defining and Targeting Cancer Neoepitopes 
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Chair: Eliezer M. Van Allen, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Building personal cancer vaccines
Patrick Ott, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Immunopeptidomics: Accelerating the development of personalized cancer immunotherapy
Michal Bassani-Sternberg, UNIL/CHUV Ludwig Cancer Research Center, Epalinges, Switzerland 

Insertion-and-deletion-derived tumour-specific neoantigens and the immunogenic phenotype: A pan-cancer analysis
Samra Turajlic, The Francis Crick Institute and the Royal Marsden Hospital, London, England

Leveraging clinical genomics for candidate neoantigen discovery
Eliezer M. Van Allen

Break
10:00 a.m.-10:20 a.m.

Plenary Session 3: Challenges and Opportunities of Genomic  Based Clinical Trials
10:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Session Cochairs: James L. Gulley, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, and José Baselga, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

NCI MATCH: A new paradigm in the era of genomic oncology
Alice P. Chen, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Navigating the known and unknown challenges in the development of a selective NTRK inhibitor: The larotrectinib story
Keith T. Flaherty, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

The National Lung Matrix Trial (NLMT): Challenges and opportunities
Gary Middleton, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom

Implementing genomic-driven basket clinical trials
José Baselga

Transcriptomic analysis of patient-derived xenografts reveals heterogeneity in human and mouse stroma/immune compartments1, 2
Henry Qixiang Li, Crown Bioscience, Inc., Beijing, China

Poster Session A
12:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Show
12:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1-4
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Concurrent Session 1: Aneuploidy as a Driver of Cancer   Evolution
Session Cochairs: Charles Swanton, The Francis Crick Institute and UCL Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom, and Samuel F. Bakhoum, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and Meyer Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York

Job's dilemma for the genome: Why bad things happen to good chromosomes
David S. Pellman, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Chromosomal instability as a driver of cancer metastasis
Samuel F. Bakhoum

Mechanisms of aneuploidy-driven tumorigenesis
Stephen J. Elledge, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Recurrent patterns of DNA copy number alterations in tumors reflect metabolic selection pressures2
Thomas G. Graeber, University of California, Los Angeles, California

Concurrent Session 2: CNS Penetration of Drugs  
Session Cochairs: E.G. Elisabeth de Vries, University Medical Centre, Groningen, The Netherlands, and Patricia S. Steeg, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Structure of the blood-tumor barrier and potential ways to overcome it
Patricia S. Steeg

Immunotherapy for CNS cancers
John H. Sampson, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

Cancer drug distribution in the brain: PET imaging as a tool
E.G. Elisabeth de Vries

Concurrent Session 3: Mechanistic Principles of Cancer Cells
Session Cochairs: Andrea Califano, Columbia University, New York, New York, and Gerard I. Evan, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England

Systematic elucidation and pharmacological targeting of mechanistic tumor dependencies
Andrea Califano

Genetics and mechanisms of chemotherapy resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Adolfo Ferrando, Columbia University, New York, New York

How Ras and Myc cooperate to drive cancers
Gerard I. Evan

Concurrent Session 4: Cancer Metabolism  
Session Cochairs: Dimitrios Anastasiou, The Francis Crick Institute, London, United Kingdom, and W. Marston Linehan, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Targeting metabolic vulnerabilities in cancer
Dimitrios Anastasiou

Are we ready for metabolic editing yet?
Angela T. Alistar, Morristown Medical Center, Morristown, New Jersey

Targeting the metabolic basis of kidney cancer
W. Marston Linehan


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Sunday, October 29 

Continental Breakfast
7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Registration
7:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 4: Deciphering the Complexity of the Tumor Microenvironment
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Cochairs: Michael Angelo, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, and Erik Sahai, The Francis Crick Institute, London, United Kingdom

Imaging therapy failure and cancer invasion
Erik Sahai

Analysis and therapeutic targeting of Hodgkin Lymphoma tumor microenvironment
Margaret A. Shipp, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Virus mimicry and pattern recognition receptor activation by exosomes in the tumor microenvironment
Andy J. Minn, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Comprehensive enumeration of infiltrating immune cells in triple negative breast cancer using multiplexed ion beam imaging
Michael Angelo

Break
10:00 a.m.-10:20 a.m.

Plenary Session 5: Epigenetics  

10:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Session Cochairs: Howard Y. Chang, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, and Louis M. Staudt, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Personal regulome navigation of cancer
Howard Y. Chang

Transcriptional addiction in cancer
James E. Bradner, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Histone-3 K27M mutant diffuse midline gliomas of childhood: Epigenetic pathogenesis and therapeutic opportunities
Michelle Monje, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California

Targeting essential transcriptional networks in lymphoma
Louis M. Staudt


Poster Session B
12:30 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Show
12:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 5-8
4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

Concurrent Session 5: DNA Damage and Repair  
Session Cochairs: Serena Nik-Zainal, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom, and Yves G. Pommier, NCI-CCR, Bethesda, Maryland

DNA damage signatures and practical use
Serena Nik-Zainal

Fanconi Anemia pathway alterations in cancer
Alan D. D'Andrea, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Precision therapeutics with DNA damaging agents
Yves G. Pommier

Concurrent Session 6: Metastatic Microenvironment  
Session Cochairs: Yibin Kang, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, and Ilaria Malanchi, The Francis Crick Institute, London, United Kingdom

Targeting stromal niche for the treatment of bone metastasis
Yibin Kang

Precision medicine for melanoma
Richard M. Marais, Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, England

The teamwork of neutrophils and cancer
Ilaria Malanchi

Heterogeneity in androgen receptor and IL-1beta expression by prostate cancer cells in skeletal metastases1,2 Asurayya A. Worrede-Mahdi, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania


Concurrent Session 7: The Role of Non-Mutated Genes in   Cancer Biology
Session Cochairs: Thomas Brabletz, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany, and Claudia Palena, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Cellular plasticity in cancer: Driving force and therapeutic target
Thomas Brabletz

Epigenetic mechanisms directly control cell cycle, DNA amplification and copy number heterogeneity
Johnathan R. Whetstine, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Brachyury and the interleukin-8 axis in tumor progression
Claudia Palena

Concurrent Session 8: Tracking Cancer in the Blood  
Session Cochairs: Maximilian Diehn, Stanford University, Stanford, California, and Caroline Dive, Cancer Research UK Manchester Institute, Manchester, United Kingdom

Circulating tumor DNA analysis for personalized cancer detection and monitoring
Maximilian Diehn

Molecular detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells
Daniel A. Haber, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts

Liquid biopsies for the management of cancer patient treatment and for early detection of cancer
Caroline Dive

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Monday, October 30
 

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Registration

7:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 6: CAR-T Therapy 

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Cochairs: Martin Pule, Autolus, London, United Kingdom, and Michel Sadelain, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

CAR therapy beyond the CD19 paradigm
Michel Sadelain

Improving remission durability after CAR T cell therapy for ALL
Terry J. Fry, National Cancer Institute/CCR, Bethesda, Maryland

Title to be announced
Martin Pule

Engineering human T cells with non-viral genome targeting
Theodore Roth, University of California, San Francisco, California

Break
10:00 a.m.-10:20 a.m.

Plenary Session 7: Drugging the Undruggable / Historically  Challenging Targets
10:20 a.m.-12:20 p.m.
Session Cochairs: Neal Rosen, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York and Jeffrey A. Engelman, Novartis, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Title to be announced2
Jeffrey A. Engelman

PROTAC-mediated protein degradation: A chemical equivalent of CRISPR2
Craig M. Crews, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

Block the exits – ABL001 enables dual targeting of BCR-ABL2
Andrew Wylie, Novartis, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Title to be announced2
Neal Rosen


Closing Remarks
12:20 p.m.-12:30 p.m.


1 - short talk from proffered paper
2 - not accredited for CME

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