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FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>

AACR Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship Recipients

This award recognizes an individual scientist whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of cancer, and who embodies the dedication of the princess to multinational collaborations.

11th Annual Award Recipient
Louis M. Staudt, MD, PhD
National Institutes of Health Distinguished Investigator
Director, Center for Cancer Genomics
Co-chief, Lymphoid Malignancies Branch
National Cancer Institute
Bethesda, Maryland

Dr. Staudt delivered his award lecture titled "Lymphoma Therapy Inspired by Functional and Structural Genomics" at the AACR Annual Meeting 2017 in Washington, D.C. The award lecture was held Monday, April 3, 2017, in the Washington Convention Center.

The AACR Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship was established and first presented in 2007 in honor of the late Princess Takamatsu of Japan. During her extraordinary life, Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamatsu expended tremendous efforts toward the public and humanitarian cause of the eradication of cancer. She is an honored and respected figure in Japan, the United States, and the cancer research community worldwide. 

The lectureship recognizes an individual scientist whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of cancer, and who embodies the dedication of the Princess to multinational collaborations.

Louis M. Staudt, MD, PhD, is honored for his groundbreaking advances in cancer research that have fostered precision cancer medicine. He is highly regarded for his pioneering use of gene expression profiling to identify clinically distinct molecular subtypes of human cancer. Dr. Staudt’s work has demonstrated the response of cancer patients to treatment, and their survival, are dictated by molecular features of their tumors at diagnosis. Taken together, these visionary discoveries have revolutionized our approach to cancer detection, and have ushered in the age of precision cancer medicine.

Dr. Staudt is currently co-chief of the Lymphoid Malignancies Branch in the NCI. In addition, he is the director of the NCI Center for Cancer Genomics, which oversees large-scale NCI programs studying the genomic aberrations in cancer. In 2011, Dr. Staudt was given the honorary title of NIH distinguished investigator. Dr. Staudt serves on the editorial boards of Cancer Cell and The Journal of Experimental Medicine. He has received numerous awards for his research, including the 2009 Dameshek Prize from the American Society of Hematology for outstanding contribution in hematology, the 2015 San Salvatore Prize for the treatment of malignant tumors, the 2016 C. Chester Stock Award Lectureship from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and election to the National Academy of Sciences in 2013.

Dr. Staudt received his BA from Harvard College in 1976, graduating cum laude in biochemistry.  He was awarded a Medical Scientist Training Program fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and received his MD and PhD degrees in 1982. His PhD thesis in the field of immunology, performed in the laboratory of Walter Gerhard, revealed somatic hypermutation as a mechanism of rapid antibody diversification during normal immune responses. Following internal medicine training, he joined Nobel Laureate David Baltimore's laboratory at the Whitehead Institute as a Jane Coffin Childs Fellow. 

Award Recipients

  • 2017: Louis M. Staudt
  • 2016: William G. Kaelin Jr.
  • 2015: Lewis C. Cantley
  • 2014: Rakesh K. Jain
  • 2013: Carlo M. Croce
  • 2012: Mary J.C. Hendrix
  • 2011: Philip C. Hanawalt
  • 2010: Mary-Claire King
  • 2009: Curtis C. Harris 
  • 2008: Lawrence A. Loeb
  • 2007: Webster K. Cavenee