American Association for Cancer Research

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Two Leading Researchers to Be Honored at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium


December 11, 2013

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SAN ANTONIO — The American Association for Cancer Research will be honoring two outstanding investigators for their contributions to breast cancer research at the 2013 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 10–14.

Sir Michael R. Stratton, Ph.D., F.R.S., director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, U.K., is being honored with the sixth annual AACR Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research, supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Jason S. Carroll, Ph.D., senior group leader at Cancer Research U.K. and fellow of Clare College, University of Cambridge, will receive the sixth annual AACR Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, funded by Susan G. Komen.

Stratton, who is also a member of the AACR’s council of scientific advisors, is being recognized for his outstanding contributions to cancer research in the area of cancer genomics and genetics. Among his groundbreaking discoveries was the mapping and identification of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2. Through the Cancer Genome Project, which he initiated at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, he identified genetic mutations key to the development of several types of cancer including the BRAF gene in malignant melanoma, a discovery that led to the development of BRAF inhibitors.

He will deliver his award lecture, “Signatures of Mutational Processes in Human Cancer,” 11:30 a.m. CT, Thursday, Dec. 12, in Hall D of the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center.

Carroll is being honored for his research on estrogen receptor biology in breast cancer. The hormone estrogen drives the approximately 70 percent of breast cancers that express the estrogen receptor, and Carroll’s work on estrogen receptor biology has led to the identification of how the estrogen receptor interacts with DNA to drive gene expression, what proteins are used, and what occurs during resistance to antiestrogen therapies. His discoveries have affected understanding of the mechanisms of action of both estrogen and androgen receptors, and as a result, his work has been applicable to both breast and prostate cancers.

Carroll will deliver his lecture, “Understanding Estrogen Receptor Transcription in Breast Cancer,” 11:30 a.m. CT, Friday, Dec. 13, in Exhibit Hall D at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center.

The Distinguished Lectureship in Breast Cancer Research, supported by Bristol-Myers Squibb and established in 2008, is given annually to an individual who has undertaken outstanding scientific research that has inspired or has the potential to inspire new perspectives on the etiology, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of breast cancer.

The Outstanding Investigator Award for Breast Cancer Research, funded by Susan G. Komen, recognizes an investigator younger than 50 whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the etiology, detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of breast cancer.