American Association for Cancer Research

AACR CANCER POLICY MONITOR

CPM

                                                                                                         AUGUST 2009

DISTRIBUTION OF ECONOMIC STIMULUS FUNDS TO SUPPORT CANCER RESEARCH BEGINS

 

NCI has awarded grants to researchers in more than 40 states

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is in the process of distributing Recovery Act funds to promising research projects across the nation. From fiscal year (FY) 2009 through FY2010, NCI will allocate approximately $1.3 billion to support projects that promise to accelerate cancer research and stimulate job creation.

Signed in to law in early February of this year, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 invested an unprecedented $10.4 billion in short-term funds in the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including $1.3 billion in the NCI.

To date, the agency has obligated approximately 7 percent of its available funds. According to its website, NCI has awarded 393 grants to more than 40 states across the country. As of July 14, $98.79 million has been awarded to extend funding for 369 existing grants and $723,110 to support 24 summer hiring awards.

Over the next two years, NCI has indicated that it will continue to use stimulus funds to support a greater number of projects by raising the pay line, or cutoff point for grant approval. The agency has also released plans to issue more grants to first-time investigators, provide support to early-stage investigators committed to careers in translational cancer research and aid universities in their efforts to assist and train new faculty investigators.

The highlight of the NCI's plan for the Recovery Act funds are three "signature initiatives," which are expected to yield significant progress over a short span of time:

  • Expand The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to accelerate the understanding of the molecular basis of cancer.
  • Design and construct a personalized cancer care drug development platform to foster efficient drug development, from discovery of genetic changes to clinical application.
  • Institute a new network of NCI-supported Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers to converge the physical sciences with cancer biology.

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Read more from the August 2009 Edition of the AACR Cancer Policy Monitor:

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