American Association for Cancer Research

Program

The Science of Cancer Health Disparities 2013

Program as of December 5

Friday, December 6

Professional Advancement SessionMICR:

Cancer Health Disparities Researcher in an Academic Medical Center – What’s in a Name?

Organized by Minorities in Cancer Research
Session Chairperson: Chanita Hughes-Halbert, Medical University of SC Hollings Cancer Center, Charleston, SC
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

This informative Professional Advancement Session provides a forum in which students, postdoctoral candidates, and junior investigators can discuss important career development issues in cancer health disparities careers. Established senior scientists will address this topic through a facilitated panel discussion.

All conference registrants are invited to attend this session at no additional cost. A complimentary lunch will be served. Please register in advance if you are interested in attending. On-site registration will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Space is limited. 

Panelists:

Elena Martinez, University of California, San Diego, CA
Brian M. Rivers, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
Hayley S. Thompson, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI

Educational Sessions 1-2

1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

  • Educational Session 1: Opportunities and Challenges of Using Technology to Address Health Disparities

    Session Chairperson: B. Lee Green, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

    • mHealth and disparities: Can mobile bridge the digital divide?
      Jay Bernhardt, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
    • Exploring mhealth from a health communications lens:  Best practice considerations
      Linda Fleisher, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA
    • The role and impact of mHealth interventions to address prostate cancer disparities: A community-based participatory research approach
      Brian M. Rivers, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
  • Educational Session 2: Next-Gen Sequencing

    Session Chairperson: Jeffrey N. Weitzel, City of Hope, Duarte, CA

    • Genomic evaluation of inherited predisposition to breast cancer
      Tom D. Walsh, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    • Adapting genomic technologies to enhance global access to cancer risk assessment: Lessons from Latin America
      Jeffrey N. Weitzel
    • ELSI with next-generation sequencing for cancer care
      Angela R. Bradbury, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Educational Sessions 3-4

2:45 p.m.-4:15 p.m.

  • Educational Session 3: Tailored Health Communications to Address Cancer Disparities

    Session Chairperson: Amelie G. Ramirez, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX

    • Using communication science to reduce cancer disparities: Inequities in access and opportunities for narrowing the digital divide
      Wen-Ying Sylvia Chou, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
    • Community-academic partnerships in the era of CBPR: A new communication paradigm
      John Estrada, Louisiana State University Health Sciences, New Orleans, LA
    • Leveraging new media to enhance cultural targeting in cancer communications
      Hayley S. Thompson, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI
  • Educational Session 4: PSA and Prostate Cancer Screening

    Session Co-Chairpersons: Nathan A. Ellis, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, and Rick A. Kittles, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL

    • The PSA screening debate
      William J. Catalona, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL
    • Title to be announced
      Otis W. Brawley, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA
    • Prostate cancer screening (testing) controversy and its impact on African American men
      Isaac J. Powell, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI

Meet-the-Expert Session

Session Chairperson/Moderator: Amelie G. Ramirez, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX
4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

A career development session focused on specific strategies that young minority investigators can use to overcome significant issues in breaking through to academic faculty positions. The experts on the panel were especially chosen to provide a range of experience and representation across scientific disciplines and types of institutions.

Panelists:

Elena Martinez, University of California, San Diego, CA
Shafiq A. Khan, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA
Rick A. Kittles, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 

Policy Forum: Enhancing Diversity in the Cancer Research Workforce

Session Chairperson: Jon Retzlaff, American Association for Cancer Research, Washington, D.C.
5:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

A diverse research workforce is integral to advancing our understanding of cancer health disparities and ultimately eliminating them. Despite longstanding efforts to increase the number of scientists from underrepresented groups in biomedical research, the research workforce falls far short of reflecting the demographics of the U.S. population as a whole. Speakers in this session will discuss the state of diversity in the research workforce, including among National Institute of Health (NIH) grant recipients and within academic medical centers. In addition, speakers will address specific initiatives that NIH and the National Cancer Institute have implemented to increase the participation of individuals from historically underrepresented groups in cancer research and other areas of biomedical science.

Race, ethnicity, and NIH research awards
Donna K. Ginther, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS

The CURE paradigm: Opportunities, approaches, and challenges for achieving diversity in the cancer workforce
Sanya A. Springfield, NCI-Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities, Rockville, MD

Opening Plenary Session

6:30 p.m.-8:15 p.m.

Keynote Address: An Agenda for Cancer Health Disparities
Otis W. Brawley, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA

Komen Distinguished Lecture: Eliminating Cancer Health Disparities: Can It Be Done?
Beti Thompson, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

Poster Session A and Opening Reception

8:15 p.m.-10:15 p.m.

 

Saturday, December 7

Special Session 1: Microbiome, Diet, and Cancer Disparities

Session Chairperson: Stephen J. D. O’Keefe, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA
8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

The high colon cancer risk in African Americans can be reduced by dietary modification
Stephen J. D. O’Keefe

Microbial sulfur metabolism and colorectal cancer risk
H. Rex Gaskins, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL

Can variations in the intestinal microbiota explain differences in colon cancer risk?
Erwin G. Zoetendal, Wageningen UR, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Break

9:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 1: Tumor Microenvironment Differences Among African American and Caucasian Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients

Session Chairperson: Shafiq A. Khan, Clark Atlanta University, Atlanta, GA
9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Distinct immune and metabolic signatures in prostate and breast tumors of African American patients
Stefan Ambs, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Functional biomarkers that promote African American prostate cancer through epigenetic regulation
Clayton C. Yates, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL

Vitamin D deficiency and prostate cancer in men with African ancestry
Larisa Nonn, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL

Free Time / Lunch on Own

11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1-2

1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 1: Multiple Chronic Conditions: Implications in Underrepresented and Medically Underserved Populations

    Session Chairperson: Richard A. Goodman, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC

    • Multiple chronic conditions and the HHS initiative: An overview
      Richard A. Goodman
    • Facilitating the patient-centeredness of care for patients with multiple chronic illnesses: Why does it matter?
      Neeraj Arora, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
    • Embracing complexity: Integrating multimorbidity into the cancer disparities research framework
      Cary P. Gross, Yale University, New Haven, CT
    • Opportunities and challenges in managing comorbidities among disadvantaged populations
      Tara O. Henderson, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Chicago, IL
  • Concurrent Session 2: Epigenetics of Adult Cancer Risk: Methylation, Imprinting, and Beyond

    Session Chairperson: Catherine Hoyo, Duke University, Durham, NC

    • Epigenetic variation may link the environment and cancer
      Catherine Hoyo
    • Epigenetics in colorectal cancer: Risk, prevention, and treatment
      Marcia Cruz-Correa, University of Puerto Rico Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Juan, PR
    • Altered imprinted gene DMR regulatory methylation in breast cancer
      David Skaar, Duke University, Durham, NC

Break

3:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Hot Topics in Cancer Health Disparities Research 1

Session Chairperson: Christopher I. Li, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

This special “Hot Topics” Session highlights some of the most innovative, high-impact research being conducted in cancer health disparities. The abstracts selected for oral presentations in this session represent the top 4% of the over 300 abstracts submitted for this conference as reviewed by the conference Co-Chairpersons and Scientific Review Committee.

Financial strain and cancer risk factors among African American adults
Pragati Advani, University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, TX

Examining perceptions about the HPV vaccine by sociodemographic characteristics and factors associated with perceptions: Findings from the 2012 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS)
Kassandra Alcaraz, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA

Childbearing factors in relation to breast cancer subtypes in African American women: A pooled analysis from the AMBER consortium
Julie Palmer, Boston University, Boston, MA

Dual inhibition of TTK and HSPA9 functions to synergistically decrease viability in triple-negative breast cancer cell lines
Nicole Lavender, The Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ

Prognostic value of miRNAs in breast cancer: Molecular type and patient race
Balananda-Dhurjati Putcha, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL

Integrated genomic and epigenomic deep sequencing analyses reveal head and neck cancer survival disparities associated to alterations in the PAX, NOTCH1, and TP53 pathways
Rafael Guerrero-Preston, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Poster Session B / Reception

5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

 

Sunday, December 8

Special Session 2: Population Differences in Alternative RNA Splicing: Potential Druggable Drivers of Tumor Phenotype and Disparities

Session Chairperson: Steven R. Patierno, Duke University, Durham, NC
8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

Splice variants associated with African American prostate cancers promote oncogenesis and chemoresistance
Norman H. Lee, George Washington University, Washington, DC

A long walk from FGFR2 alternative splicing to cancer progression
Mariano A. Garcia-Blanco, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

Role of PTB and hnRNP A1/A2 and their regulated splicing targets in glioblastoma
Jian Zhang, Columbia University, New York, NY

Break

9:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 2: Clinical Trials Outcomes in Patients From Different Populations

Session Chairperson: Judith S. Kaur, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Inclusion of African Americans in cancer clinical trials: Potential quality of life, comorbidity, and pharmacogenetic-related barriers
Richard M. Goldberg, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH

Lessons learned from the Walking Forward Program in recruiting American Indians on clinical trials
Daniel G. Petereit, Rapid City Regional Hospital, Rapid City, SD

Overcoming cultural and geographic barriers to participation in clinical trials among Native Hawaiians
Jeffrey L. Berenberg, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI

Free Time / Lunch on Own

11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 3-4

1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 3: Understanding Second Cancers in Minority Populations: A Provocative Area for CHD Survivorship Research

    Session Chairperson: Jacqueline Casillas, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

    • Second cancers and health disparities: Cure, care, surveillance, and the future!
      Noreen Aziz, National Institute of Nursing Research, Bethesda, MD
    • The inclusion of advocates in identifying and addressing provocative topics in cancer disparities and equity research
      Kimlin T. Ashing, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA
    • Cancer survivorship and health equity research: Lessons learned from pediatric, adolescent, and young adult survivors
      Jacqueline Casillas
  • Concurrent Session 4: Rare Cancers in Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved

    Session Chairperson: Bodour Salhia, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ

    • Gastric cancer and ethnicity in the Andean Region
      Eduardo Tarazona-Santos, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
    • Genomic interrogation of rare cancers reveal targeted therapeutic opportunities
      John D. Carpten, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ
    • Accelerating progress through public health genomics networks
      Olufunmilayo I. Olopade, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL

Break

3:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Hot Topics in Cancer Health Disparities 2

Session Chairperson: Scarlett L. Gomez, Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA
3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

This special “Hot Topics” Session highlights some of the most innovative, high-impact research being conducted in cancer health disparities. The abstracts selected for oral presentations in this session represent the top 4% of the over 300 abstracts submitted for this conference as reviewed by the conference Co-Chairpersons and Scientific Review Committee.

Patient-provider communication and colorectal cancer screening in three Asian communities
Karen Kim, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Socioeconomic determinants of the receipt of guideline-concordant breast cancer treatment
Jean McDougall, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Diabetes and racial/ethnic differences in hepatocellular carcinoma risk: The Multiethnic Cohort
Veronica Setiawan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Advanced glycation end-products are increased in prostate cancer and may promote racial disparity
David Turner, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

Exome sequencing identifies germline mutations in African American families with hereditary prostate cancer
Wanguo Liu, Department of Genetics, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA

Nuclear HSET, a predictor for metastasis, disease relapse and poor survival, is a racial disparity biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer patients
Angela Ogden, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

Poster Session C / Reception

5:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

 

Monday, December 9

Special Session 3: Precision/Personalized Medicine: Promise and Pitfalls

Session Chairperson: Ngina Lythcott, Black Women’s Health Imperative, Provincetown, MA
8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

Promise and pitfalls of personalized medicine from a clinical science perspective
Nefertiti C. duPont, Houston, TX

Genomic medicine the path to reducing health disparities? Social scientist perspective
Vence L. Bonham, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, MD

The promise and the challenge of personalized medicine: A patient advocate perspective
Mary J. Scroggins, In My Sister's Care/The Pathways Project, Washington, DC

Break

9:00 a.m.-9:15 a.m.

Plenary Session 3: With a Vision to the Future: Novel Concepts in Stem Cell-Driven Cancers

Session Co-Chairpersons: Lisa Newman, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, and Victoria L. Seewaldt, Duke University, Durham, NC
9:15 a.m.-11:15 a.m.

Origins of ovarian cancer, the biology of premalignancy, and cancer health disparities
Sophia H. George, Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, Canada

The role of WNT10B/ß-Catenin signaling and HMGA2 in lung metastasis: A model for cancer health disparities
Gustavo A. Miranda-Carboni, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

Differences in breast cancer signaling and metabolic integration associated with African versus European ancestry
Evelyn Jiagge, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Point/Counterpoint Session: Colorectal Cancer Screening for African Americans: Should We Be Screening at an Earlier Age?

Session Chairperson/Moderator: Elena Martinez, University of California, San Diego, CA
11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

African Americans have the highest colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality of any racial/ethnic group and the lowest median age of presentation. To try and reduce the burden of CRC among African Americans, some groups, including the American College of Gastroenterology, the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, and the American College of Physicians have recommended early initiation of screening at age 45 or 40 years instead of age 50. However, the effectiveness of early screening as a strategy for reducing burden of CRC among African Americans is uncertain.

Pro: John M. Carethers, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Con: Samir Gupta, University of California, San Diego, CA

Closing Remarks

12:15 p.m.-12:30 p.m.

Departure

12:30 p.m.