American Association for Cancer Research

Program

Double immunofluorescence for nestin (pink) and the endothelial marker CD34 (green) with EGFR fluorescence in situ hybridization (red) confirms expression of nestin in endothelial cells and in glioblastoma cells of patients treated with cediranib. Courtesy of (Co-Chairperson, Rakesh Jain’s lab): di Tomaso et al. Glioblastoma Recurrence after Cediranib Therapy in Patients: Lack of “Rebound” Revascularization as Mode of Escape. Cancer Res; 71(1): 19-28, January 1, 2011.


Program as of August 28

*Short talks from proffered papers

Wednesday, September 14

Keynote Lecture

6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.


Building molecules to guide anticancer therapy
Roger Y. Tsien, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Opening Welcome Reception

7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

 

Thursday, September 15

Continental Breakfast / Meet-the-Expert Roundtables

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 1: Understanding the Cancer Genome

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Special Opening Lecture
Cancer genomes and their implications for basic and applied research
Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD

Discovery in cancer genomics by next-generation sequencing and data analysis
Elaine Mardis, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

Insights into tumor biology and therapeutic resistance from systematic genetic studies
Levi A. Garraway, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Session 2:  Cancer as an Organ

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Normalizing the tumor microenvironment to enhance therapeutic outcome
Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

Role of nitric oxide in tumor microenvironment
Dai Fukumura, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

DNA-damaging anticancer therapies modify the tumor microenvironment
Judy Campisi, Buck Institute for Age Research, Novato, CA

Direct signaling between platelets and cancer cells induces an epithelial-mesenchymal-like transition and promotes metastasis*
Myriam Labelle, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, Cambridge, MA

A genetic screen for novel determinants of anoikis resistance identifies PVRL4*
Natalya N. Pavlova, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Mentoring Roundtables / Lunch on own

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 3:  Immunomodulation

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Immune checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy:  New insights and opportunities
James P. Allison, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Blockade of immunologic checkpoints in cancer therapy: The B7-H1/PD-1 pathway
Suzanne L. Topalian, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

NK cells in tumor immunity
Lewis L. Lanier, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Poster Session A

4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

 

Friday, September 16

Continental Breakfast / Meet-the-Expert Roundtables

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 4: Genomic Instability and Genome Surveillance

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Exploiting cell cycle checkpoint control in cancer therapy
Helen M. Piwnica-Worms, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

How the p53 pathway controls the response to chemotherapy
David P. Lane, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research (A*STAR), Singapore

Targeting the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway in cancer therapy
Alan D. D’Andrea, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

The BLM helicase facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated ribosomal RNA transcription
Patrick Grierson, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH*

Regulation of the Fanconi anemia pathway by a SUMO-like delivery network
Kailin Yang, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA*

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Session 5:  Risk Factors

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.


New insights into the microenvironment and metastasis
Zena Werb, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Systems genetics analysis of cancer susceptibility
Allan Balmain, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA

Ribosomal protein-Mdm2-p53 signaling and metabolism
Yanping Zhang, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Human Merkel cell polyomavirus causes Merkel cell carcinoma: Implication of viral etiology in human cancers*
Huichen Feng, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA

Why redheads are at increased risk of melanoma: A novel BRAF mutant mouse model*
Devarati Mitra, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

Mentoring Roundtables/ Lunch on own

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 6: Reprogramming and Plasticity of Cancer Stem Cells

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Induction of pluripotency by defined factors
Shinya Yamanaka, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Stem cell self-renewal and cancer cell proliferation
Sean J. Morrison, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Reprogramming cell fate by mimicking natural mechanisms
Helen M. Blau, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 

The complexity of tumor cell hierarchies

Jeremy N. Rich, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH

Poster Session B

4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, September 17

Continental Breakfast / Meet-the-Expert Roundtables

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 7: Emerging Technologies for Cancer Research

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Measuring evolution in neoplasms
Carlo Maley, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Technologies for detecting and analyzing proteins in living cells
Alice Y. Ting, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Microfluidic measurements of single cell mass reveal how growth and division are coordinated
Scott Manalis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

An oncolytic vaccinia virus encoding the human sodium iodide symporter facilitates long-term deep tissue image monitoring of virotherapy and targeted radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer*
Dana Haddad, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

From prediction to prognosis and therapeutics: The power of breast cancer transcriptional networks*
Bin Zhang, Sage Bionetworks, Seattle, WA

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Session 8: Metabolism and Autophagy

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Role of autophagy and cellular metabolism in cancer
Eileen P. White, UMDNJ-The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ

Oncogene regulation of the autophagy machinery
Beth C. Levine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

2-Oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases: Potential links between altered metabolism and cancer
William G. Kaelin, Jr., Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

PICT1/GLTSCR2 is a critical nucleolar binding partner of RPL11 that regulates the MDM2-p53 pathway and tumor growth*
Kohichi Kawahara, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

A mechanistic investigation into the dynamic alliance between autophagy and tumor suppression in prostate cancer*
Lorena A. Puto, Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA

Mentoring Roundtables / Lunch on own

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 9: Epigenetics and Cancer

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

DNA methylation and nucleosome repositioning in cancer
Peter A. Jones, USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA

Role of Tet1-catalyzed 5mC hydroxylation in transcriptional regulation and ES cell maintenance
Yi Zhang, Howard Hughes Medical Institute at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Targeting epigenetic reader proteins in cancer therapy
James E. Bradner, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Egfr is essential for Ras-driven pancreatic cancer development*
Barbara M. Gruener, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany

Extracellular miR-92a secreted by human leukemia cells enhances endothelial cell migration in HUVECs*
Tomohiro Umezu, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan

Poster Session C

4:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

 

Sunday, September 18

Continental Breakfast / Meet-the-Expert Roundtables

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

*advance sign-up required onsite

Session 10: Killing the Tumor Cell

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Harnessing genetic dependencies in cancer therapy
Alan Ashworth, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK

The application of synthetic lethality as a therapeutic approach to cancer
Christopher Lord, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK

Drugging the undruggable: Small molecule inhibition of the Ras oncoprotein
Guowei Fang, Genentech, Inc., San Francisco, CA

The canonical Wnt pathway participates in anchorage-independent growth in a subset of heterogeneous tumor cells derived from a single murine pancreatic tumor*
Man Yeung Heung, University of Edinburgh CRUK Centre, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Germline submicroscopic chromosome imbalances in pediatric cancer*
Carla Rosenberg, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.

Session 11: Mechanisms of Drug Resistance

10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

Using old mouse models to identify new cancer drug targets
Michael T. Hemann, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Finding mechanisms of cancer drug resistance through functional genetic screens
René Bernards, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance to targeted therapies
Jeffrey A. Engelman, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

Inhibition of RNA polymerase I as a therapeutic strategy for cancer-specific activation of p53*
Megan J. Bywater, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia

Important bidirectional function in the Notch-Delta signaling in pancreatic carcinogenesis and metastasis*
Pawel K. Mazur, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Departure