American Association for Cancer Research

Program

Frontiers in Basic Cancer Research 2013

Program as of September 16

*Short talks from proffered papers

Wednesday, September 18

Welcome and Keynote Lectures

6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Scott W. Lowe, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Lgr5 stem cells in self-renewal and cancer
Hans Clevers, Hubrecht Institute, Utrecht, The Netherlands

Somatic alterations in human cancer genomes
Matthew L. Meyerson, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Opening Reception

8:00 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

 

Thursday, September 19

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Plenary Session 1: Transcription and Epigenetics

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Jacqueline A. Lees, MIT Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Cambridge, MA

Title to be announced
Jacqueline A. Lees

Deconstructing p53 pathways in vivo
Laura D. Attardi, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

Chromosomal translocations and transcriptional elongation control in epigenetics and cancer
Ali Shilatifard, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO

Genome-wide profiling reveals stimulus-specific functions of p53 in human embryonic stem cells*
Abhinav K. Jain, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

"Guardians of repeats": Novel and significant relationship of p53 and interferon*
Katerina Leonova, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 2: Post-Transcriptional Regulation

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Davide Ruggero, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA

Misregulation of pre-mRNA splicing in cancer
James L. Manley, Columbia University, New York, NY

Translational control of cancer via eIF4E/4E-BPs
Nahum Sonenberg, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Novel insights into synthetic lethal interactions in cancer: Common nodes in protein synthesis control and nucleotide metabolism
Davide Ruggero

Roles and regulation of wild-type and mutant forms of p53
Carol L. Prives, Columbia University, New York, NY

AACR Women in Cancer Research (WICR) Career Mentoring Session

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

This session has been designed for graduate students, medical students and residents, and clinical and postdoctoral fellows. Following a keynote address, attendees will meet, network, and learn from many of the leading senior scientists in cancer research. Topics include careers in industry, writing a CV, careers in translation research, mentoring and supervising, and many more. Although all conference attendees are invited to attend this session, it is geared toward early-career female investigators. A separate registration for this event is recommended (http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/wicrbasic). Only conference registrants may participate in this session. Onsite registration will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Seating is limited.

Free Time / Lunch on Own

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 3: Noncoding RNAs

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Pier Paolo Pandolfi, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA

Antagonistic interactions among polycistronic oncomir components regulate oncogene-dependent apoptosis
Lin He, University of California, Berkeley, CA

MicroRNAs in oncogenic and tumor suppressor signaling pathways
Joshua Mendell, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

The noncoding RNA revolution in cancer research
Pier Paolo Pandolfi

Hmga2 promotes lung adenocarcinoma progression as a competing endogenous RNA*
Madhu S. Kumar, London Research Institute, London, United Kingdom

LIN28B promotes growth and tumorigenesis of the intestinal epithelium primarily via Let-7 repression*
Blair Madison, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Poster Session A / Reception

4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Click here for a list of abstracts being presented in this session.

 

Friday, September 20

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Plenary Session 4: Genetic and Functional Heterogeneity

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Joan S. Brugge, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Glioma stem cells and cancer
Luis F. Parada, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Heterogeneity in drug sensitivity
Joan S. Brugge

Genetic and functional tumor heterogeneity
Charles Swanton, Cancer Research UK, London, United Kingdom

Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals phenotypic plasticity of drug tolerant clonal populations of cancer cells*
Fernando J. Lopez-Diaz, Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA

Collective invasion in breast cancer requires a conserved basal epithelial program*
Kevin J. Cheung, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 5: Stress Response, Apoptosis, Autophagy, and Senescence

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Carol L. Prives, Columbia University, New York, NY

Dysregulated mTORC1 renders cells critically dependent on desaturated lipids for survival under tumor-like stress
M. Celeste Simon, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Role of autophagy in cancer
Eileen P. White, UMDNJ–The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ

Activities of wild-type and mutant p53
Karen H. Vousden, Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow, United Kingdom

Systematic genetic interaction maps reveal rewiring of the stress response network and resulting vulnerabilities in leukemia and multiple myeloma cells*
Martin Kampmann, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Autophagic degradation of Δ133p53 during replicative cellular senescence: An isoform-specific protein degradation mechanism for p53*
Izumi Horikawa, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Lunch on Own / Free Time

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 6: Cancer Microenvironment

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Mikala Egeblad, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY

Fatty liver disease and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma: Role of inflammation and aberrant metabolism
Michael Karin, University of California, San Diego, CA

Tissue tension engages developmental programs to promote tumor progression
Valerie M. Weaver, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA

Seeing cancer in context: Insights from live imaging of tumor-stroma interactions
Mikala Egeblad

Fine temporal and spatial dissection of medulloblastoma progression with MADM, a mouse genetic mosaic model*
Brit Ventura, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Novel Hedgehog co-receptors in pancreatic cancer progression*
Esha Mathew, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Poster Session B / Reception

4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Click here for a list of abstracts being presented in this session.

 

Saturday, September 21

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Plenary Session 7: Cancer Metabolism

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Lewis C. Cantley, Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY

PI3K and cancer metabolism
Lewis C. Cantley

mTOR, metabolism, and cell growth control in cancer
John Blenis, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Linking cancer metabolism to epigenetic reprogramming
Craig B. Thompson, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Medulloblastoma-associated mutations in the DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3X impair protein translation*
Yasmine A. Valentin-Vega, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

Bringing the outside in: Macropinocytosis and cancer therapeutics*
Cosimo Commisso, New York University School of Medicine, New York

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 8: Metastasis

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Joan Massagué, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Metastasis pathways
Joan Massagué

Regulation of metastasis in breast cancer
Zena Werb, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA

Cell fate determinants as regulators of cancer metastasis
Yibin Kang, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Interleukin-4 receptor α chain regulates the growth of primary and metastatic mammary tumors*
Katherine T. Venmar, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Lineage labeling elucidates the natural history of metastatic colonization*
Nicole M. Aiello, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Free Time / Lunch on Own

12:30 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

Plenary Session 9: Interpreting the Cancer Genome

2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Stephen J. Elledge, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Haploinsufficiency in cancer
Stephen J. Elledge

Functional genomics, experimental models, and cancer
William C. Hahn, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Towards rationale therapy: Dealing with inter- and intratumor heterogeneity
Dana Pe’er, Columbia University, New York, NY

Unraveling mechanisms of tumor suppression in vivo
Scott W. Lowe, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Poster Session C / Reception

4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Click here for a list of abstracts being presented in this session.

 

Sunday, September 22

Continental Breakfast

7:00 a.m.-8:00 a.m.

Plenary Session 10: Signaling I – Cancer Signaling Networks

8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Frank McCormick, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA

Targeting cancer cell dependencies on developmental signal transduction pathways
Lawrence Lum, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Targeting Ras proteins in human cancer
Frank McCormick

Hippo signaling in development and cancer
Duojia Pan, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, MD

Hedgehog signaling in urothelial stem cell physiology and malignancy
Philip A. Beachy, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:15 a.m.

Plenary Session 11: Signaling II – Signaling and Drug Resistance

10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Kevin Shannon, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Title to be announced
Neal Rosen, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Targeting hyperactive Ras in cancer
Kevin Shannon

Hypoxia induces lapatinib resistance in ErbB2-positive breast cancer cells via regulation of DUSP2*
Sergey V. Karakashev, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA

Combined inhibition of ribosome function and ribosomal RNA gene transcription cooperate to delay relapse and extend survival in MYC-driven tumors*
Richard B. Pearson, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Australia