American Association for Cancer Research

Program

Bookmark and Share


Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research 2011

* - Short talk from proffered paper

Saturday, October 22

Educational Sessions 1-2

10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

  • Educational Session 1: Precancer Detection with Imaging and Other Technologies

    Session Chairperson: Robert J. Gillies, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

    Cell imaging at the nanoscale: Detecting nuclear chromatin alterations in field carcinogenesis
    Vadim Backman, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

    Imaging ‘omics in cancer detection
    Robert J. Gillies

    Bioengineering and clinical applications of circulating tumor cell chips
    Shyamala Maheswaran, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA

  • Educational Session 2: Prevention of Cancer in Patients and Survivors

    Session Chairperson: Patricia A. Ganz, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA

    Prevention of cancer in patients and survivors: Epidemiology of survivorship, late effects burden, setting the stage
    Patricia A. Ganz

    Risk and surveillance for second malignant neoplasms and late recurrence
    Kevin C. Oeffinger, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

    Role of diet, energy balance, nutrition and the risk for recurrence
    John P. Pierce, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, San Diego, CA

    Intersection of cancer, aging, and survivorship
    Arti Hurria, City of Hope, Duarte, CA

Professional Advancement Session

Session Chairperson: Powel H. Brown, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Limited seating available, click here to pre-register.


Career development in cancer prevention
Powel H. Brown

Maintaining a work/life balance
Judy E. Garber, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Getting a grant
Electra D. Paskett, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH

    Roundtable Discussants:
  • Powel H. Brown, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
  • Judy E. Garber, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
  • Electra D. Paskett, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH
  • Patricia A. Ganz, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA
  • Ernest T. Hawk, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
  • Kevin C. Oeffinger, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
  • Elizabeth A. Platz, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD

Educational Sessions 3-4

1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

  • Educational Session 3: Application of New Technology for Genome-Wide DNA Methylation to Population Studies for Etiology and Prevention

    Session Chairperson: Karl T. Kelsey, Brown University, Providence, RI

    Epigenome-wide association studies
    John M. Greally, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

    Issues in applications of genome-wide methylation data to epidemiology
    Karl T. Kelsey

    Analysis of DNA methylation arrays in population studies: Issues and opportunities
    E. Andrés Houseman, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

  • Educational Session 4: Use of Molecularly Targeted Cancer Prevention Agents

    Session Chairperson: Jack Cuzick, Cancer Research UK, London, United Kingdom

    Breast cancer chemoprevention
    Jack Cuzick

    Update on COX-2 inhibitors in cancer prevention
    Ernest T. Hawk, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

    Aspirin chemoprevention for Barrett's and esophageal cancer: The AspECT trial
    Janusz A. Jankowski, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Leicester, England

Educational Sessions 5-6

2:45 p.m.-4:15 p.m.

  • Educational Session 5: Risk Communication and Use of Social Media

    Session Chairperson: K. Vish Viswanath, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

    Social media and cancer communications: Promises and perils
    K. Vish Viswanath

    Building a tobacco-free world: Engaging youth and young adults
    Donna Vallone, American Legacy Foundation, Washington, DC

    Social media use, communication inequalities, and public health: Where we are and where we need to go
    Emily Z. Kontos, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston, MA

    Harnessing the power of social media in cancer control communication
    Wen-Ying Sylvia Chou, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

  • Educational Session 6: Promoting Global Health Through Cancer Prevention

    Session Chairperson: Surendra S. Shastri, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India

    Cancer prevention and early detection programs in resource-limited settings: Examples from India
    Surendra S. Shastri

    Breast cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries
    Cheng-Har Yip, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Cancer prevention and screening programs in Brazil
    Edmundo C. Mauad, Barretos Cancer Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil

Opening Plenary Session
Celebrating the 10th Anniversary of the Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference: Progress and Promise

6:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m.

Welcome
Judy E. Garber, AACR President, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA

Opening Remarks
Powel H. Brown, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Perspective on Then (2002) and Now (2011)
Waun Ki Hong, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Distinguished Lecture
The age of cancer: Can our understanding of the molecular circuitry of aging illuminate the path to prevention?

Ronald A. DePinho, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Keynote Address
Translational research on nicotine addiction treatment

Caryn Lerman, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Special Lecture
Cancer prevention over 30 years: Challenges, distractions, but progress
Walter C. Willett, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA

Opening Reception

8:15 p.m.-9:45 p.m.

 

Sunday, October 23

Plenary Session 1: New Technologies in Cancer Discovery and Cancer Prevention

Session Chairperson: William C. Hahn, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Advances in functional cancer genomics
William C. Hahn

Building the Texas Cancer Diagnostics Pipeline one biomarker at a time
John T. McDevitt, Rice University, Houston, TX

Quantitative biology and biomarker discovery without immunoassays
Steven A. Carr, Broad Institute, Cambridge, MA

Special Session 1: Cancer Risk Assessment in the Post-Genomics Era

Session Chairperson: Judy E. Garber, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA
10:15 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

Using genomic technologies to improve cancer risk assessment
Kenneth Offit, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Deep sequencing in the clinic: Implications for prevention
Stephen B. Gruber, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Return of incidental findings and research results: Implications for prevention research
Robert C. Green, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Panel Discussion

Special Sessions 2-3

11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

  • Special Session 2: Environmental Carcinogens

    Session Chairperson: John D. Groopman, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD

    Introduction
    John D. Groopman

    Life-stage susceptibility and low dose response as important factors in carcinogen identification
    Suzanne E. Fenton, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Endocrine disruptor chemicals as possible agents in breast cancer promotion
    Lawrence H. Kushi, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA

      Panel Discussion:
    • Christine B. Ambrosone, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
    • Suzanne E. Fenton
    • John D. Groopman
    • Lawrence H. Kushi
    • Elizabeth A. Platz, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Special Session 3: Follow-Up on the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST)

    Session Chairperson: John K. Field, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom

    Follow-up on the National Lung Screening Trial: The next steps
    John K. Field

    The National Lung Screening Trial: Important implications for lung cancer screening and treatment
    Christine D. Berg, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

    The Italung study and state of art of randomized screening trials in Europe
    Eugenio Paci, ISPO-Institute for Research and Prevention of Cancer, Florence, Italy

      Panel Discussion:
    • John K. Field
    • Christine D. Berg
    • Eugenio Paci
    • Kim Norris, Lung Cancer Foundation of America, New Ulm, MN

Free Time / Lunch on Own

12:30 p.m.-1:15 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions 1-2

1:15 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 1: Prevention of Gastrointestinal Cancers: Colorectal, Liver, and Pancreas

    Session Chairperson: Paul J. Limburg, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

    Genetic profiles of precancerous pancreatic lesions
    Michael G. Goggins, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutes, Baltimore, MD

    Glycoproteomic discovery of liver cancer biomarkers: Be careful how you use it
    Timothy M. Block, Drexel University College of Medicine, Doylestown, PA

    Moving from molecular biology to clinical prevention in colorectal cancer
    William M. Grady, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

    Properties of adenomas in subjects treated with difluoromethylornithine and sulindac for reduction of colorectal adenomas *
    Philip M. Carpenter, University of California at Irvine, Orange, CA

  • Concurrent Session 2: Prevention of Gynecologic Cancers: Ovary, Uterine, and Cervix

    Session Chairperson: Karen H. Lu, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

    Endometrial cancer: High risk cohorts and strategies for prevention
    Karen H. Lu

    Ovarian cancer GWAS: Path from risk assessment to prevention?
    Thomas A. Sellers, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

    Prevention of human papillomavirus-related malignancy in the post-vaccine era
    Marc T. Goodman, Cancer Research Center of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI

    The association between antioxidant intake and ovarian cancer risk: Results from a population-based case-control study in New Jersey *
    Dina Gifkins, The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ

Plenary Session 2: Energy Balance and Cancer Prevention: From Bench to Bedside to Community

Session Chairperson: Stephen D. Hursting, University of Texas, Austin, TX
3:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m.

Energy balance and cancer prevention: Mechanistic insights from mutant mice
Stephen D. Hursting

Energy balance and cancer prevention: Lessons from clinical research
Pamela J. Goodwin, University of Toronto Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

Energy balance and cancer prevention: Population sciences and community/environmental initiatives
Rachel Ballard-Barbash, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

AACR-Prevent Cancer Foundation Award Lecture for Excellence in Cancer Prevention Research

5:15 p.m.-6:15 p.m.

Obesity and breast inflammation: Implications for cancer prevention
Andrew J. Dannenberg, Weill Cornell Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY

Behavioral Science in Cancer Research Networking Event

6:15 p.m.-7:45 p.m.

Members of the Behavioral Science in Cancer Research Working Group (BSCR) and those interested in the field are invited to attend this networking event. Attendees can learn about membership in the BSCR Working Group and network with colleagues.

Robert T. Croyle, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; and William Klein, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Poster Session A / Reception

6:15 p.m.-8:45 p.m.

 

Monday, October 24

Plenary Session 3: Advances in Tobacco Prevention, Cessation, and Harm Reduction Strategies

Session Chairperson: Ellen R. Gritz, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Smoking cessation: An imperative for cancer patients and survivors
Ellen R. Gritz

Using technology for early cancer prevention among youth
Alexander V. Prokhorov, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Innovative policies to reduce tobacco use and harm
Dorothy K. Hatsukami, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Conceptual frameworks for the comprehensive evaluation of tobacco products
Peter G. Shields, Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC

Concurrent Sessions 3-4

10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 3: Aerodigestive Cancer Prevention: Lung, Head and Neck, and Esophagus

    Session Chairperson: David P. Carbone, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN

    Introduction
    David P. Carbone

    Rolling out personalized cancer prevention in the lung and head and neck
    Scott M. Lippman, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

    Chemoprevention of lung cancer by metformin
    Phillip A. Dennis, National Cancer Center, Bethesda, MD

    The evolving landscape of human neoplasia
    Brian J. Reid, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

    A prospective study of systemic markers of inflammation and risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a Barrett’s esophagus cohort *
    Sheetal Hardikar, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

  • Concurrent Session 4: Prevention of Breast and Prostate Cancer: Basic Science to Clinical Intervention

    Session Chairperson: Karen T. Liby, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH

    New drugs for the chemoprevention of experimental breast cancer
    Karen T. Liby

    Tumor and genomic heterogeneity in breast cancer prevention
    Christine B. Ambrosone, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY

    Prevention of prostate cancer
    Elizabeth A. Platz, Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD

    Physical activity and risk of breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC): Results for different tumor subtypes *
    Karen Steindorf, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany

Free Time / Lunch on Own

12:00 p.m.-1:15 p.m.

Plenary Session 4: Using Team Science to Make Advances in Cancer Prevention

Session Chairperson: Ian M. Thompson, Jr., University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX
1:15 p.m.-3:15 p.m.

Early Detection Research Network - Biomarker discovery and validation: A team approach
Ian M. Thompson, Jr.

Oral iloprost for the chemoprevention of lung cancer: A multicenter, SPORE-initiated trial
Robert L. Keith, University of Colorado, Denver, CO

Systems approach to cancer prevention
Gordon B. Mills, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Concurrent Sessions 5-6

3:15 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 5: Biomarkers of Precancer

    Session Chairperson: Sudhir Srivastava, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

    An overview of biomarker discovery and development
    Sudhir Srivastava

    Discovery and development of biomarkers in lung and mesothelioma
    Harvey Ira Pass, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY

    New approach to developing and validating biomarkers for prostate cancer
    Mark A. Rubin, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY

    Predictive and prognostic methylated gene markers for breast cancer
    Saraswati V. Sukumar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

    Biomarkers of inflammation predict colorectal cancer risk among women: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) cohort *
    Adetunji T. Toriola, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany

  • Concurrent Session 6: Results From Early-Phase Clinical Trials from the Chemoprevention Consortium

    Session Chairperson: Leslie G. Ford, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

    Phase IIA trial of sulindac in individuals at increased risk for melanoma
    Clara Curiel-Lewandrowski, Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ

    Phase IB randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study of Polyphenon E in women with a history of hormone receptor-negative breast cancer
    Katherine D. Crew, Columbia University Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, NY

    Randomized double-blinded phase II trial of esomeprazole versus esomeprazole plus two doses of aspirin in Barrett's esophagus patients
    Gary W. Falk, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

    Critique and "What's the next step?"
    Frank L. Meyskens Jr., University of California at Irvine, Orange, CA

Poster Session B / Reception

5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

MEG Molecular Epidemiology Working Group (MEG) Town Meeting and Reception

7:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

All conference attendees are invited and encouraged to attend the AACR Molecular Epidemiology Working Group’s (MEG) Town Meeting with a reception to follow.

Update from the National Cancer Institute
Deborah Winn, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD

Training and funding opportunities through the NCI
Jonathan S. Wiest, Center for Cancer Training, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

 

Tuesday, October 25

Plenary Session 5: New Innovations for Integrating Mouse Models in Prevention Research

Session Chairperson: Cory Abate-Shen, Columbia University Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, NY
8:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Prosenescence therapy for cancer prevention
Pier Paolo Pandolfi, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Interrogating mouse models to identify biomarkers for human cancer progression
Cory Abate-Shen

Modeling population genetic heterogeneity for cancer prevention and epidemiological investigations
David W. Threadgill, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Translating the cancer genome
Lynda Chin, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Concurrent Sessions 7-8

10:15 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 7: Novel Pathways/Targets for Cancer Prevention

    Session Chairperson: Young-Joon Surh, Seoul National University College of Pharmacy, Seoul, Korea

    Modulation of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory signaling for cancer chemoprevention
    Young-Joon Surh

    Molecularly targeted cancer prevention: From discovery to medicine
    Zigang Dong, University of Minnesota Hormel Institute, Austin, MN

    IL6 and Akt as targets for chemoprevention
    Victoria L. Seewaldt, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

    PKCε-activated Stat3 and subsequent AR interaction are potential molecular targets for prevention of late-stage prostate cancer *
    Ajit Verma, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

  • Concurrent Session 8: Immunoprevention and Targeting Stress Pathways

    Session Chairperson: Olivera J. Finn, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

    Insights on ER stress at the tumor-immune interface
    Maurizio Zanetti, University of California, San Diego, CA

    Psychological stress and disease progression
    Barbara L. Andersen, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

    Oncogenic stress regulates sensitivity of cells to elimination by natural killer cells and T cells
    David H. Raulet, University of California, Berkeley, CA

    Testing cancer vaccines in the setting of premalignant disease: State of immunity and determinants of response
    Olivera J. Finn

    Stress management improves prevention relevant outcomes among women at risk for breast cancer *
    Bonnie A. McGregor, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

Departure