American Association for Cancer Research

Program

Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research 2013

Program as of October 8

*Short talks from proffered papers

Sunday, October 27

Educational Sessions 1-2

10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.

  • Educational Session 1: Tumor Microenvironment as an Emerging Target for Cancer Prevention and Therapy
    Session Chairperson: Young-Joon Surh, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
    • Targeting inflammatory microenvironment for cancer chemoprevention and therapy
      Young-Joon Surh
    • Inflammatory responses in gastrointestinal cancer development and malignant progression
      Masanobu Oshima, Kanazawa University Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa, Japan
    • Forward and backward cell transformation induced by microenvironment factors: A tribute to Allan H. Conney
      Zigang Dong, University of Minnesota Hormel Institute, Austin, MN
  • Educational Session 2: DNA Methylation in Cancer Prevention
    Session Chairperson: Jean-Pierre Issa, Fels Institute, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
    • Epigenetic variation as the missing link between aging and cancer
      Jean-Pierre Issa
    • Interaction between genetics, epigenetics, and environment in cancer prevention
      Benjamin Tycko, Columbia University, New York, NY
    • DNA methylation as a target in cancer prevention
      Steven A. Belinsky, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

Professional Advancement Session

11:30 a.m.-12:55 p.m.

How to Make Your Career in Cancer Prevention Successful
Chairperson: Paul J. Limburg, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

  • Welcome and introduction
    Paul J. Limburg
  • Launching a career in cancer prevention: The big picture
    Jessica M. Faupel-Badger, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Progress in cancer prevention requires a multidisciplinary approach 
    Presentations and panel discussion:
    Powel H. Brown, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
    Sir John Burn, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom
    Susan M. Gapstur, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA
    Patricia A. Thompson, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ
    Graham W. Warren, Hollings Cancer Center Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC

Pre-registration is encouraged for this session.  Click HERE to register now.

Educational Sessions 3-4

1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m.

  • Educational Session 3: Harnessing Big Data for Prevention
    Session Chairperson: James R. Cerhan, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 
    • Using electronic health data in "real world" studies: Examples and opportunities in the HMO Cancer Research Network
      Vincent Paul Doria-Rose, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
      Kathleen Mazor, Meyers Primary Care Institute/University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA
    • The era of big data informatics for clinical and translational research in cancer prevention
      Jyotishman Pathak, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Educational Session 4: Metabolomics: Experiment Design and Interpretation
    Session Chairperson: Steven S. Gross, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY
    • Untargeted metabolite profiling as a powerful new tool in the armamentarium of cancer researchers
      Steven S. Gross
    • XCMS cloud-based metabolomics: A platform for the cancer biologist
      Gary Siuzdak, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA
    • Interpretation of metabolomic data: Challenges and approaches
      Gabi Kastenmüller, Helmholtz Center Munich, Neuherber, Germany

Educational Sessions 5-6

2:45 p.m.-4:15 p.m.

  • Educational Session 5: Nuclear Receptors and Prevention
    Session Chairperson: Powel H. Brown, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
    • Targeting nuclear hormone receptors for breast cancer prevention
      Powel H. Brown
    • Targeting estrogen receptors for breast cancer prevention
      Leslie Ford, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
    • Rexinoid nuclear receptors and cancer prevention
      Ethan Dmitrovsky, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
  • Educational Session 6: Circulating Tumor Markers
    Session Chairperson: Klaus Pantel, University Medical Center Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    • Detection and characterization of viable circulating tumor cells
      Catherine Alix-Panabières, University Medical Center Montpellier, Montpellier, France
    • Circulating ovarian cancer biomarkers and early detection
      Andrew K. Godwin, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS
    • Circulating tumor cells vs. circulating tumor cell products
      Klaus Pantel

Opening Plenary Session

6:00 p.m.-8:15 p.m.

Welcome
Raymond N. DuBois, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Opening Remarks
Paul J. Limburg, Program Chairperson, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

Introduction and Award Presentation for John P. Pierce
Paolo Boffetta, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY

2013 AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cancer Prevention Research Lecture
A focus on health behaviors to prevent cancer
John P. Pierce, UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA

Special Lecture
Enabling next-generation cancer control

Robert T. Croyle, Director, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

 

Special Lecture
NCI Division of Cancer Prevention: Where we are and where we are headed

Barnett S. Kramer, Director, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

Opening Reception

8:15 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

 

Monday, October 28

Forum 1: Guidelines for HPV Vaccination for Cancer Prevention

7:00 a.m.-7:55 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Anna R. Giuliano, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

Global impact of HPV vaccination
Anna R. Giuliano

Dissemination of HPV vaccination in the U.S.: The role of physician recommendation
Susan T. Vadaparampil, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

Plenary Session 1: Tobacco Use in the Cancer Patient: A Clinically Devastating Addiction and Unmet Need

8:00 a.m.-9:40 a.m.
Session Co-Chairpersons: Ellen R. Gritz, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, and Graham W. Warren, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 
 
The clinical and biologic effects of tobacco on cancer treatment
Graham W. Warren

Smoking, molecular markers, and the risk of second cancers in cancer patients
Fadlo R. Khuri, Emory University, Atlanta GA

Tobacco assessment and cessation in cancer patients: An urgent need
Benjamin A. Toll, Yale University, New Haven CT

Concurrent Sessions 1-2

10:00 a.m.-11:40 a.m.

  • Concurrent Session 1: Cancer Immunoprevention
    Session Chairperson: Mary L. (Nora) Disis, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 
    • Vaccines to prevent breast cancer
      Mary L. (Nora) Disis
    • Tipping the balance from a procarcinogenic to an anticancer response to prevent pancreatic cancer
      Elizabeth M. Jaffee, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
    • Frameshift peptide vaccination: Towards cancer prevention in Lynch syndrome
      Matthias Kloor, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
    • HPV genotype distribution and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in African American and white women living in the Southeastern United States*
      Adriana C. Vidal, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC
  • Concurrent Session 2: Mechanisms and Animal Models
    Session Chairperson: Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
    • Factors that impinge on the p53 pathway modify cancer risk
      Guillermina (Gigi) Lozano
    • Elucidating mechanisms of environmentally induced kidney cancers
      David W. Threadgill, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
    • Fat-fiber combination: The missing ingredient?
      Robert S. Chapkin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
    • Combinational targeting of 5-LOX/COX and PI3K/AKT signaling to prevent progression of PanINs to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in p48Cre/+.LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice*
      Altaf Mohammed, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK

Lunch

11:45 a.m.-12:35 p.m.

Keynote Session

12:40 p.m.-1:25 p.m.

Cancer prevention in the era of health reform
Howard K. Koh, Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC

Plenary Session 2: Carcinogenesis and Causes of Human Cancer

1:30 p.m.-3:10 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Thomas W. Kensler, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA

Childhood cancer: Effects of genetic susceptibility and exposures to environmental agents
Joseph L. Wiemels, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Aristolochic acid-induced nephropathy and urothelial carcinoma: A preventable global disease
Arthur P. Grollman, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY

Changing landscape of environmental carcinogenesis in Qidong, China: Lessons for prevention
Thomas W. Kensler

Special Sessions 1-2

3:15 p.m.-4:10 p.m.

  • Special Session 1: Spotlight on Proffered Abstracts
    Session Co-Chairpersons: Paul J. Limburg, Program Chairperson, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, and Dan A. Dixon, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 
    • Frizzled 9 expression is a potential marker of response to iloprost chemoprevention of lung cancer*
      Meredith Tennis, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO
    • Exogenous estrogen as a mediator of racial differences in insulin-like growth factor-I levels among postmenopausal women*
      Su Yon Jung, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
    • Effects of Hsp90 inhibitors on triple-negative breast cancer: Notch as a therapeutic target for stem cells*
      Prabhu Ramamoorthy, University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS
    • Prediagnostic obesity and inactivity are associated with shorter telomere length in prostate-cancer associated stromal cells*
      Corinne E. Joshu, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Special Session 2: Policy and Regulatory Issues in Cancer Prevention: Is There a Role for E-Cigarettes?
    Session Chairperson: Scott J. Leischow, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ  
    • Nature and epidemiology of e-cigarettes 
      Scott J. Leischow
    • Does it hurt to try? Effects of e-cigarette sampling on smoking behavior and motivation to quit
      Theodore L. Wagener, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK
    • Carcinogens and toxicants in e-cigarettes
      Maciej Lukasz Goniewicz, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY
    • Research needs and policy implications of e-cigarettes
      Discussant: Ellen R. Gritz, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Distinguished Lecture on Targets for Cancer Prevention

4:30 p.m.-5:15 p.m.

Cancer genomes and their implications for early detection
Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD

Poster Session A / Reception

5:20 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

 

Tuesday, October 29

Forum 2: Current Controversies in Mammographic Screening

7:00 a.m.-7:55 a.m.
Session Chairperson: James R. Cerhan, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

Overdiagnosis in mammographic screening
Mireille Broeders, UMC St. Radboud, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

Risk-based breast cancer screening
Karla M. Kerlikowske, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Plenary Session 3: Microbiota

8:00-9:40 a.m. 
Session Chairperson: Giorgio Trinchieri, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD

The preponderant role of the microbiota colorectal cancer
Christian Jobin, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Microbes, biofilms, and the immune microenvironment of human colon cancer: Implications for prevention 
Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD

Commensal bacteria control cancer response to therapy by modulating the tumor microenvironment
Giorgio Trinchieri

Concurrent Sessions 3-4

10:00 a.m.-11:40 a.m.

  • Concurrent Session 3: Simulation Modeling to Guide Lung Cancer Control Planning and Priorities
    Session Chairperson: Eric J. (Rocky) Feuer, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
    • The role of NCI's Cancer Intervention and Surveillance Modeling Network (CISNET) in guiding cancer control planning and priorities
      Eric J. (Rocky) Feuer
    • Modeling past and future smoking patterns in the U.S.
      Theodore Holford, Yale University, New Haven, CT
    • The impact of reduced tobacco smoking on lung cancer mortality in the United States during 1975-2000
      Suresh Moolgavkar, Exponent, Inc., Clyde Hill, WA
    • Extrapolating from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) to determine optimal lung cancer screening regimens 
      Rafael Meza, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Concurrent Session 4: Prevention Opportunities for Recalcitrant Cancers and Tumor Progression Factors
    Session Chairperson: Patricia A. Thompson, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ
    • Reducing lung cancer mortality by 50% in the next decade: Is it feasible?
      K. Michael Cummings, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC
    • Pancreatic cancer: Deriving a model of prevention
      Andrew D. Rhim, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
    • Stemming the rising tide of liver and esophageal cancers
      Patricia A. Thompson
    • Body size and multiple myeloma mortality: A pooled analysis of 20 prospective studies*
      Lauren R. Teras, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA

Poster Session B / Lunch

11:45 a.m.-1:25 p.m.

Plenary Session 4: Sedentary Time and Cancer from Observation to Application

1:30-3:10 p.m.
Session Chairperson: Susan M. Gapstur, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA

The epidemiology of sitting time and cancer
Alpa V. Patel, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA

The biology behind inactivity and cancer
Kathryn H. Schmitz, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Working in innovative settings to enhance reach and improve population-based physical activity levels
Laura Linnan, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

Concurrent Sessions 5-6

3:15-4:55 p.m.

  • Concurrent Session 5: Genomics and Epigenetics of Risk Prediction in Early Disease
    Session Chairperson: Janusz A. Jankowski, Plymouth University, Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdom
    • Genomics and cancer management: Mind the gap!
      Janusz A. Jankowski
    • Integrating biomarkers in Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma
      Janusz A. Jankowski
    • Translating NGS discoveries for cancer susceptibility
      Kenneth Offit, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY
    • Identification of novel methylated genomic regions in invasive cervical cancer using a genome-wide approach*
      Erin M. Siegel, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL
  • Concurrent Session 6: Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE): Integrative Interdisciplinary Science 
    Session Chairperson: Shuji Ogino, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, Boston, MA
    • Molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE): Overview of its paradigm and wide applicability even without tumor tissue
      Shuji Ogino
    • Insight into colorectal cancer etiology through MPE: Unmasking the links with obesity and smoking
      Peter T. Campbell, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA
    • Integrating epidemiological, pathological, clinical, and omic data in ovarian cancer
      Celeste Leigh Pearce, USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA
    • Mammographic breast density and subsequent risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women according to the status of selected tissue markers: A case-control study*
      Lusine Yaghjyan, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

Prevention Pioneer Session: Dedicated to the Memory of Allan H. Conney

5:05 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Session Co-Chairpersons: Phillip A. Dennis, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and Patricia A. Thompson, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ

Introduction for Michael B. Sporn
Karen T. Liby, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH

Chemoprevention of cancer: Past, present, and future
Michael B. Sporn, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH

Poster Session C / Reception

6:05 p.m.-7:45 p.m.

Molecular Epidemiology Working Group (MEG) Town Meeting and Reception

7:00 p.m.-8:30 p.m.
Join the Molecular Epidemiology Working Group or find out more about MEG

Featured speaker:

Asking novel questions and challenging paradigms: A junior investigator’s toolbox to leverage existing resources during tough times
Michael B. Cook, NCI-DCEG, Rockville, MD

 

Wednesday, October 30

Special Session 3: Advances in Cancer Screening and Prevention

7:00-7:55 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Ernest T. Hawk, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

Cut melanoma deaths in half with screening? Current status 
Martin A. Weinstock, Brown University, Providence, RI

Cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries: Lessons from India
Surendra S. Shastri, Tata Memorial Center, Mumbai, India

Plenary Session 5: Inflammation, NSAIDs and Cancer Prevention

8:00-9:40 a.m.
Session Chairperson: Raymond N. DuBois, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ

Inflammatory mediators, tumor microenvironment, and progression of colorectal cancer
Raymond N. DuBois

Obesity, inflammation, and breast cancer
Andrew J. Dannenberg, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY

Progress towards routine use of aspirin by people at increased risk of cancer
Sir John Burn, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, United Kingdom

Tumor biomarker discovery for aspirin chemoprevention by molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) approach
Shuji Ogino, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA

Concurrent Sessions 7-8

10:00-11:40 a.m.

  • Concurrent Session 7: Screening and Chemoprevention Trials
    Session Chairperson: Howard H. Bailey, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, WI
    • A Phase IIa randomized, double-blind trial of erlotinib in inhibiting EGF receptor signaling in aberrant crypt foci of the colon
      Steven M. Lipkin, Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY
    • Local transdermal therapy for DCIS and for breast cancer prevention
      Seema A. Khan, Northwestern University Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL
    • Natural history of small colorectal polyps at in vivo CT colonography surveillance
      Perry J. Pickhardt, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI
  • Concurrent Session 8: Molecular Imaging
    Session Chairperson: Gooitzen van Dam, University Medical Center, Groningen, The Netherlands
    • Expediting clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques in oncology and its role in preventive medicine
      Gooitzen van Dam
    • New strategies for optical-guided detection of (pre)malignant lesions
      Wouter Nagengast, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
    • 3D electron microscopy in cellular and molecular imaging: Applications to cancer
      Sriram Subramaniam, National Cancer Insitute, Bethesda, MD