American Association for Cancer Research

Program

* Indicates proffered presentation from selected abstract

SUNDAY, JUNE 6

Educational Sessions

Chairpersons: Montserrat Garcia-Closas, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, and Mark E. Sherman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

  • Educational Session 1: Biomarker Discovery for Epidemiological Studies

    1:00 p.m.-2:00 p.m.

    Developing phenotypic biomarkers in cancer epidemiology
    Xifeng Wu, UT M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX

    Using omics for biomarker discovery
    Martyn T. Smith, University of California, Berkeley, CA

  • Educational Session 2: Assessment of Biomarker Variability and Its Impact in Epidemiological Studies

    2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

    Impact of biomarker variability in ovarian cancer early detection research
    Nicole D. Urban, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

    Validation and variability in quantitative analysis of chemical-adducts in human and experimental samples
    John D. Groopman, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD

Break

3:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Educational Sessions

Chairpersons: Montserrat Garcia-Closas, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, and Mark E. Sherman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

  • Educational Session 3: Use of Biomarkers in Epidemiology: Study Design and Sources of Biases

    3:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.

    Use of biomarkers in studies of cancer etiology: Considerations in study design
    Montserrat Garcia-Closas, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

    Design issues and sources of bias for the use of biomarkers in studies of cancer prognosis
    James R. Cerhan, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

  • Educational Session 4: Issues in Collection, Storage, and Analysis of Biospecimens in Large-scale Epidemiological Studies, Including QC Issues

    4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m.

    Issues in collection, storage, and analysis of biospecimens in large-scale epidemiological studies, including QC issues
    Shelley S. Tworoger, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA

    Molecular pathology in epidemiologic research: From study designs to data
    Mark E. Sherman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Dinner on own

5:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Welcome and Keynote Session: Where is Molecular Epidemiology?

Chairpersons: Paolo Boffetta, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, and Thomas A. Sellers, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

Where is molecular epidemiology? Inroads into prognosis, prediction of treatment response, and screening
Jack Cuzick, Cancer Research UK, London, England

Where is molecular epidemiology? Lessons from the GWAS
David J. Hunter, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA

Networking Reception

8:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.

 

MONDAY, JUNE 7

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Session 1: New Tools for Biomarker Discovery

Chairpersons: John D. Groopman, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and Martyn T. Smith, University of California, Berkeley, CA
8:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Overview
John D. Groopman and Martyn T. Smith

Epigenetics
Karl T. Kelsey, Brown University, Providence, RI

Using adducts of serum albumin for carcinogen discovery
Stephen M. Rappaport, University of California, Berkeley, CA

Elevated serum levels of CXCL13 precede the diagnosis of B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)*
Otto Martinez, University of California, Los Angeles, CA

The breast-cancer associated SNP rs11249433 and mRNA expression of the NOTCH2 gene*
Yi-Ping Fu, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Break

10:30 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Session 1: New Tools for Biomarker Discovery (continued)

Chairpersons: John D. Groopman, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and Martyn T. Smith, University of California, Berkeley, CA
11:00 a.m.-12:35 p.m.

The gut microbial community as biomarker of dietary exposure and cancer risk
Meredith A. Hullar, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

Airway gene expression as a biomarker of the physiological response to tobacco smoke exposure
Avrum E. Spira, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA

Using sibling pairs to study the epigenetic effects of prenatal PAH exposure*
Julie B. Herbstman, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY

Lunch on own

12:35 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

Session 2: Validation and Application of New Biomarkers and Measurement Tools in Translational Studies

Chairpersons: John D. Groopman, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, and Cornelia M. Ulrich, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany
3:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

Overview
John D. Groopman and Cornelia M. Ulrich

Noninvasive measurement of dermal carotenoids by resonance raman spectrometry as a biomarker of nutritional status
Susan T. Mayne, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT

Validation and application of serum markers for early detection of ovarian cancer
Nicole D. Urban, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

Differential methylation of multiple epigenetic markers in peripheral blood leukocyte DNA: A potential screening measure for pancreatic cancer at all stages*
Liang Wang, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

DNA methylation array analysis identifies profiles of blood-derived DNA methylation associated with bladder cancer*
Carmen J. Marsit, Brown University, Providence, RI

Poster Session A / Reception

5:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

 

TUESDAY, JUNE 8

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Session 3: Applications of New Biomarkers in Molecular Epidemiology Studies

Chairpersons: Montserrat Garcia-Closas, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, and Mark E. Sherman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
8:30 a.m.-10:40 a.m.

Overview
Montserrat Garcia-Closas and Mark E. Sherman

Use of biomarkers to evaluate genotype-phenotype relationships in the context of dietary exposures
Johanna Wyss Lampe, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA

Studying intermediate endpoint biomarkers in a spectrum of molecular epidemiology studies
Nathaniel Rothman, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Repurposing genetic variation in molecular epidemiology
Gloria M. Petersen, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN

Metabolic and inflammatory markers as risk factors for pancreatic cancer: A prospective case-control study*
Verena A. Grote, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

Mitochondrial DNA copy number and risk of gastric cancer: A report from the Shanghai Women’s Health Study*
Linda M. Dong, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Break

10:40 a.m.-11:00 a.m.

Session 4: Biomarkers of Intervention and Clinical Response

Chairpersons: Paolo Boffetta, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, and Gloria M. Petersen, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

Overview
Paolo Boffetta and Gloria M. Petersen

Predictive biomarkers for gene promoter hypermethylation in smokers and lung cancer patients
Steven A. Belinsky, Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM

Adiposity, inflammation, and DNA repair: The continuum from prevention to treatment response
Cornelia M. Ulrich, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

Imaging biomarkers in cancer therapy
Robert J. Gillies, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

Effects of supplemental vitamin D and calcium on biomarkers of inflammation in colorectal adenoma patients: A randomized, controlled clinical trial*
Myfanwy H. Hopkins, Emory University, Atlanta, GA

Poster Session B / Lunch

1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m.

Session 5: Challenges I - Dealing with Complexity

Chairpersons: Martyn T. Smith, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and Cornelia M. Ulrich, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany
4:00 p.m.-6:10 p.m.

Overview
Martyn T. Smith and Cornelia M. Ulrich

Dealing with the complexity of the environment and approaches to assessing it through exposomics
Martyn T. Smith

Molecular epidemiology and risk assessment
Christopher J. Portier, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC

The analysis of genes, biomarkers, and treatments in smoking cessation
David V. Conti, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Epitope polymorphisms in hepatitis B virus, long-term dynamics of viral load, and subsequent risk of hepatocellular carcinoma*
Chi-Jung Huang, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Polymorphisms in microRNA biogenesis genes represent biologically plausible ovarian cancer susceptibility loci*
Jennifer Permuth-Wey, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL

Evening off / Dinner on own

6:10 p.m.-

 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Session 6: Challenges II – How Can Biomarker Studies Contribute to Cancer Prevention?

Chairpersons: Paolo Boffetta, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, and Thomas A. Sellers, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.

Biomarkers for diet and cancer prevention research: Potentials and challenges
Cindy D. Davis, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Prevention, Rockville, MD

Can changes in breast density and endocrine symptoms be used to predict response to endocrine preventive therapy for breast cancer?
Jack Cuzick, Cancer Research UK, London, England

The contribution of molecular epidemiology to primary prevention of cancer
Paolo Boffetta

Break

10:00 a.m.-10:30 a.m.

Panel Discussion
The Future - Towards The Integration of Biomarkers into Epidemiology

Chairpersons: Gloria M. Petersen, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, and Thomas A. Sellers, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL
10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Introduction / Opening remarks
Thomas A. Sellers

Panel Discussion
Gloria M. Petersen, Thomas A. Sellers, and additional panelists to be announced

STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Epidemiology studies – Molecular Epidemiology STROBE-ME: An extension of the STROBE statement*
Kurt Straif, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France

Wrap-up / Closing comments
Gloria M. Petersen

Departure