American Association for Cancer Research

Program

Program as of March 1, 2010

*Indicates proffered presentation from selected abstracts

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 27

Session 1: Telomere Protection I

Chairperson: Virginia A. Zakian, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ
6:00 p.m.-7:35 p.m.

Persistent telomere damage induces bypass of mitosis and tetraploidy
Titia de Lange, Rockefeller University, New York, NY

The roles of Ku and DNA LIGIV at human telomeres
Eric Hendrickson, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Dyskeratosis congenita-associated TINF2 mutations affect TRF1 levels and sister telomere cohesion*
Ghadir Sasa, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX

TRF1 mediates mitotic abnormalities induced by Aurora-A overexpression*
Hiroyuki Seimiya, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan

Role of mammalian RAP1 in telomere maintenance, subtelomeric gene silencing and general transcriptional regulation*
Paula Martinez, Spanish National Cancer Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain

Networking Reception

7:35 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 28

Continental Breakfast

8:00 a.m.-9:00 a.m.

Keynote Presentation

Chairperson: Titia de Lange, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
9:00 a.m.-9:45 a.m.

Targeting telomerase for cancer therapeutics
Jerry W. Shay, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Session 2: DNA Damage Response and Cancer I

Chairperson: Roger R. Reddel, Children's Medical Research Institute, Westmead, NSW, Australia
10:00 a.m.-11:45 a.m.

Understanding fanconi anemia
Simon Boulton, Cancer Research UK, South Mimms, England

TRF2 controls a cell-extrinsic anti-cancer barrier via activation of natural killer cells
Eric Gilson, ENS de Lyon, Lyon, France

DNA end processing mediated by Mre11/Rad50 complexes
Tanya Paull, University of Texas, Austin, TX

Biochemical study of Ccq1 for activity control of fission yeast telomerase*
Motoki Saito, Graduate School of Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Greater variability in telomeres in cancer cells and shorter telomeres in cancer-associated stromal cells are associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer death in surgically-treated men*
Alan K. Meeker, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Lunch (provided)

11:45 a.m.-1:45 p.m.

Session 3: Telomerase I

Chairperson: Titia de Lange, Rockefeller University, New York, NY
1:45 p.m.-3:20 p.m.

Telomerase action at human telomeres
Woodring E. Wright, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Regulation of telomerase by shelterin and TERRA
Joachim Lingner, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

An RNAi screen for Tert transcriptional regulators identifies HIF1α as critical for telomerase function in murine embryonic stem cells*
Richard Allsopp, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI

HPV E6 protein interacts physically and functionally with the cellular telomerase complex*
Xuefeng Liu, Georgetown University, Washington, DC

Alternative spliced variants of TERT have extra-telomeric function*
Radmila Hrdlickova, University of Texas, Austin, TX

Session 4: Telomerase II

Chairperson: Woodring E. Wright, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
3:35 p.m.-5:25 p.m.

Recognizing short S. cerevisiae telomeres for elongation
Virginia A. Zakian, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Telomerase, stem cells, and Wnt signaling
Steven E. Artandi, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA

A role for sumo modification in telomere localisation and length maintenance*
Helder Ferreira, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland

RTEL is required for genome stability and telomere maintenance*
Evert-Jan Uringa, Terry Fox Laboratory, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada

RecQ helicases interact with shelterin proteins and take part in maintenance and repair of telomeric DNA*
Avik Ghosh, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD

The interaction of β-catenin and telomerase and its role during carcinogenesis*
Falk Mancke, Institute of Molecular Medicine and Cell Research, Freiburg, Germany

Dinner on own

5:25 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Poster Session A

7:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

 

MONDAY, MARCH 1

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Session 5: DNA Damage Response and Cancer II

Chairperson: Lorraine S. Symington, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY
8:30 a.m.-9:50 a.m.

Mechanisms underlying translocations in B lineage cells
Frederick W. Alt, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA

Genetic analysis of chromosome break metabolism in eukaryotic cells
John H. J. Petrini, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

The role of DNA repair in the sensitivity of telomeric regions to double-strand breaks in human cells*
John P. Murnane, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Self-complementary mutant telomeric repeats engage an alternative fusion pathway in human cancer cells*
Bradley A. Stohr, University of California, San Francisco, CA

Session 6: Telomere Protection II

Chairperson: Steven E. Artandi, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA
10:30 a.m.-12:05 p.m.

Telomere metabolism during the cell cycle revealed by analyzing single telomeres in human cells
Fuyuki Ishikawa, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Evolution of telomere protein complexes involved in telomere replication and new telomere synthesis
Carolyn Price, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH

FEN1 facilitates replication fork re-initiation and ensures telomere stability*
Sheila A. Stewart, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

Evidence for chromosome end protection by two distinct telomere architectures*
Anita Kazda, Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Vienna, Austria

Telomere lengths, pulmonary fibrosis, and telomerase (tert) mutations*
Christine Kim Garcia, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Lunch on own

12:05 p.m.-2:05 p.m.

Session 7: Stem Cells, Cancer, and Telomeres

Chairperson: Jerry W. Shay, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
2:05 p.m.-3:40 p.m.

Reprogramming of chromosome ends: A key step in the generation of iPS cells*
Rosa Marion, Spanish National Cancer Center, Madrid, Spain

Heritable mutations in telomerase genes and cancer
Peter M. Lansdorp, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Vaccination strategies against telomerase in cancer
Gary W. Middleton, St. Luke's Cancer Centre, Guildford, England

In vivo and in vitro inhibition of multiple types of cancer stem cells by the novel telomerase inhibitor imetelstat*
Robert J. Tressler, Geron Inc., Menlo Park, CA

Telomerase inhibitor imetelstat sensitive and resistant response phenotypes in non-small cell lung cancer
Robin E. Frink, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

Session 8: Telomere Length Regulation

Chairperson: Joachim Lingner, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland
4:05 p.m.-5:40 p.m.

Regulation of telomere replication and end protection in budding yeast
Victoria Lundblad, Salk Institute Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA

Telomere-driven epigenetic changes during aging
Jan Karlseder, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA

The Est3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulates telomerase catalytic activity through direct interaction with Est2p*
Katherine L. Friedman, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Enzymatic requirements of human telomerase for telomere homeostasis and cellular immortalization*
Yasmin D'Souza, McGill University, Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada

3’end processing of telomerase RNA in fission yeast*
Wen Tang, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO

Dinner on own

5:40 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Poster Session B

8:00 p.m.-10:30 p.m.

 

TUESDAY, MARCH 2

Continental Breakfast

7:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m.

Session 9: Telomere Protection III

Chairperson: Vicki Lundblad, Salk Institute Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA
8:30 a.m.-10:05 a.m.

DNA-templated telomere synthesis in cancer and normal cells
Roger R. Reddel, Children's Medical Research Institute, Westmead, NSW, Australia

Telomere dysfunction and fusion in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: Evidence for telomere crisis
Duncan Baird, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales

Embryonic stem cells and ALT cancer cells share key chromatin players and a common pathway in the regulation of telomere chromatin integrity*
Lee H. Wong, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville, VIC, Australia

Interaction of MUS81 and BLM is required for telomere recombination*
Qin Yang, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

ALT-immortalized human cells are critically dependent on the Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 to limit BLM-dependent recombination and amplification of telomeric repeat DNA*
M. Stephen Meyn, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada

Session 10: Genome Instability

Chairperson: Woodring E. Wright, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
10:20 a.m.-11:50 a.m.

Mechanism and regulation of DNA end resection
Lorraine S. Symington, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY

Cellular senescence and telomeric DNA damage
Fabrizio d'Adda di Fagagna, F.I.R.C. Institute for Molecular Oncology, Milan, Italy

Interplay between homologous recombination and end joining in maintaining genome stability
Andre Nussenzweig, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

Telomere dysfunction induced senescence limits human cancer progression*
Utz Herbig, New Jersey Medical School-UMDNJ, Newark, NJ

Departure