American Association for Cancer Research

AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology

Robert D. Schreiber, Ph.D.  Second Annual Award Recipient
Robert D. Schreiber, Ph.D.
Alumni Professor, Pathology and Immunology
Professor, Molecular Microbiology
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Mo.

Dr. Schreiber will deliver his award lecture titled Cancer Immunoediting: Applying Mechanistic Insights to Cancer Immunotherapy at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. The award ceremony and lecture will be held on Wednesday, April 9, 2014, from 10 to 11:00 a.m. in the San Diego Convention Center. Visit the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 page for more information.

  • Learn more about the 2014 AACR award recipient. 

The Award

The AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology was established to honor the memory of the late Lloyd J. Old and recognizes an active scientist whose outstanding and innovative research in cancer immunology has had a far-reaching impact on the cancer field.

The recipient of the award will receive an honorarium of $10,000, give a 50-minute lecture during the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. (April 5-9, 2014), and will be provided support for the recipient and a guest to attend the AACR Annual Meeting 2014.

 Eligibility

  • The award is open to all cancer immunologists who are affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science anywhere in the world. Such institutions include those in academia, industry, or government.
  • Candidates will be considered on the basis of their highly significant and innovative research, the impact of these discoveries on the cancer field, and the stimulation of new directions in cancer immunology. All areas of cancer immunology will be considered for this award.
  • Candidates must currently maintain an active research program, have a record of recent publications, and be able to present an exciting award lecture at the annual meeting.
  • The award will be presented to an individual investigator.
  • Institutions or organizations are not eligible for the award.

Nomination Procedure and Instructions

Nominations may be made by any scientist, whether an AACR member on nonmember, who is now or has been affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science. Candidates may not nominate themselves.

Nominations are closed.

Selection Process

Candidates will be considered by an Award Selection Committee composed of members nominated by both the Cancer Research Institute and the AACR. After careful deliberation by the committee, its recommendations will be forwarded to the Executive Committee of the AACR for final consideration and decision. Selection of the award recipient will be made on the basis of the candidate's scientific accomplishments without regard to race, gender, nationality, geographic location, or religious or political views.

Supporter

Generously supported by the Cancer Research Institute.

Questions?

Linda Stokes, Program Associate
American Association for Cancer Research
615 Chestnut Street, 17th Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19106-4404
awards@aacr.org

SPOTLIGHT

Robert D. Schreiber, Ph.D. Second Annual Award Recipient
Robert D. Schreiber, Ph.D.
Alumni Professor, Pathology and Immunology
Professor, Molecular Microbiology
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, Mo.


Dr. Robert D. Schreiber is being recognized for his pioneering contributions to the field of cancer immunology, which have helped establish a clearer understanding of the immune system’s role in tumor progression. His important discoveries include the identification of IFNγ as a key cytokine in antitumor immunity and the development of the cancer immunoediting concept, which integrates the host protective and tumor promoting functions of the immune system and provides a framework for the design of cancer immunotherapies.

Recently, Schreiber pioneered the use of genomics approaches to define the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer immunoediting. He used next generation sequencing and epitope prediction algorithms to identify an immunodominant peptide derived from a mutant intracellular protein and showed that it was the antigen for CD8 T cells that controlled the growth of a fibrosarcoma. As the tumor evolved in the presence of the immune system, tumor cell variants emerged that did not express the mutant protein allowing the tumor to escape immunological recognition and destruction. This was a telling example of cancer immunoediting. The take-home message is that Schreiber’s approach of using a combination of genomics and T-cell biology can identify tumor specific mutational antigens that have the potential for use as highly specific targets for cancer immunotherapies.

Dr. Schreiber’s work has led to a generalized appreciation of the profound effect of immunity on developing tumors and has contributed critical conceptual and practical support to the fields of tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy.
In addition to his academic positions at Washington University, Dr. Schreiber is also an affiliate of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research; an associate director of the Scientific Advisory Board to the Cancer Research Institute; a co-founder of Igenica, a biotech company focused on producing new monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapeutics and a senior advisor of Jounce, a biotech company focused on developing immunomodulatory cancer therapeutics. 
 

Dr. Schreiber is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a past member of the board of scientific advisors at the National Cancer Institute. Other accolades include election in 1996 as a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the 2001 William B. Coley Award from CRI, and the 2007 Charles Rodolphe Brupbacher Prize for Cancer Research.

Dr. Schreiber received his doctorate from the State University of New York at Buffalo and completed his postdoctoral training at the Scripps Institute in La Jolla, Calif., where he served on the faculty before joining Washington University.