American Association for Cancer Research

AACR-Minorities in Cancer Research Jane Cooke Wright Memorial Lectureship

Levi A. Garraway, M.D., Ph.D.  Ninth Annual Award Recipient
Levi A. Garraway, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass.


Dr. Garraway will deliver his award lecture titled The Cancer Genome in Biology, Therapy, and Drug Resistance at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. The award ceremony and lecture will be held Sunday, April 6, 2014, from 3:15 to 4:30 p.m. in the San Diego Convention Center. Visit the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 page for more information.


The Lectureship

The AACR-Minorities in Cancer Research Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship was first presented in 2006. The lectureship is intended to give recognition to an outstanding scientist who has made meritorious contributions to the field of cancer research and who has, through leadership or by example, furthered the advancement of minority investigators in cancer research.

The recipient of the award will receive an honorarium of $5,000, give a 50-minute lecture during the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. (April 5-9, 2014), and will be provided support for the recipient and a guest to attend the AACR Annual Meeting 2014.

Learn more about Dr. Jane Cooke Wright.

Eligibility

  • Candidacy is open to all cancer researchers who are affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science anywhere in the world. Such institutions include those in academia, industry, or government.
  • The lectureship will be presented to an individual investigator.
  • Institutions or organizations are not eligible for the lectureship.

Nomination Process

Nominations are closed.

Nominations may be made by any scientist, whether an AACR member or nonmember, who is now or has been affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science. Candidates may not nominate themselves.

Selection

Candidates will be considered by a Selection Committee of international cancer leaders appointed by the president of the AACR. After careful deliberations by the committee, its recommendations will be forwarded to the Executive Committee of the AACR for final consideration and decision. Selection of the recipient will be made on the basis of the candidate's contributions to the field of cancer research and to the advancement of minorities. No regard will be given to age, race, gender, nationality, geographic location, or religious or political views.

Supporter

Supported by AACR-Minorities in Cancer Research.

Questions?

Linda Stokes, Program Associate
American Association for Cancer Research
615 Chestnut Street, 17th Floor
Philadelphia, PA  19106-4404
awards@aacr.org

SPOTLIGHT

Levi A. Garraway, M.D., Ph.D.  Ninth Annual Award Recipient
Levi A. Garraway, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Boston, Mass.


Dr. Levi A. Garraway is an associate professor of medicine in the Department of Medical Oncology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He is also the inaugural director of the Joint Center for Cancer Precision Medicine (CCPM) at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Broad Institute. In addition, he is a faculty member of Dana-Farber’s Center for Cancer Genome Discovery, and an associate member of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, where he leads several large cancer genome analyses and functional genomics efforts in the Broad Institute Cancer Program.

Dr. Garraway has made seminal research contributions in cancer genomics, drug resistance, and genomics-driven (or “precision”) cancer medicine. He published the first genome sequencing studies of aggressive primary prostate cancer, and has led major sequencing initiatives in melanoma and head/neck cancers. This work identified multiple new cancer genes and uncovered mechanisms by which complex rearrangements arise. At the Broad Institute, he also leads the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia, a collaboration with Novartis that involves a genomic and pharmacological study of ~1000 human cancer cell lines to characterize sensitivity and resistance to anticancer agents.
 

Dr. Garraway was the first to describe a mechanism of clinical resistance to MEK and RAF inhibitors (MEK1 mutations) in BRAF-mutant melanoma. Subsequently, he pioneered the use of systematic gain-of-function screens to characterize resistance to RAF inhibition. This work has identified novel resistance effector (the COT kinase) and informed a conceptual framework for interpreting resistance mechanisms relevant to many tumor types.

Dr. Garraway is perhaps best known for his contributions to precision cancer medicine. He described the first high-throughput adaptation of a genomic technology to profile human tumors for hundreds of “actionable” cancer gene mutations. This provided a basis for tumor mutation profiling as a means to stratify cancer patients for clinical trial enrollment and, in the future, optimal therapeutic choices. He also demonstrated the promise of massively parallel sequencing as a clinical tumor genomic profiling approach. This research has inspired precision medicine initiatives at many cancer centers worldwide.
 

For all his remarkable contributions to the field of cancer research, Dr. Garraway has been the recipient of several awards and honors, including the Minority Scholar Award from the American Association of Cancer Research, the Partners in Excellence Award, and the Career Award in the Biomedical Sciences from the Burroughs-Wellcome Fund. In the fall of 2007, he was awarded one of the first prestigious New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health and in 2009 was inducted into the American Society for Clinical Investigation.