American Association for Cancer Research

AACR Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award

Jedd D. Wolchok, M.D., Ph.D.  38th Annual Award Recipient
Jedd D. Wolchok, M.D., Ph.D.
Lloyd J. Old/Ludwig Chair in Clinical Investigation
Chief, Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, N.Y.


Dr. Wolchok will deliver his award lecture titled Realizing the Potential of Cancer Immunotherapy at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. The award ceremony and lecture will be held on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, from 4 to 5 p.m. in the San Diego Convention Center. Visit the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 page for more information.


The Award and Lecture

The AACR and the Rosenthal Family Foundation established this award in 1977 to recognize research that has made, or promises to soon make, a notable contribution to improved clinical care in the field of cancer. In its desire to honor and provide incentive to investigators relatively early in their careers, the foundation has stipulated that recipients not be more than 50 years of age at the time the award is received.

The recipient of the 38th Annual AACR Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Memorial Award will receive an honorarium of $10,000, give a 50-minute lecture during the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif., USA (April 5-9, 2014), and be given support for the recipient and a guest to attend the Annual Meeting. 


Eligibility

  • Candidacy is open to cancer researchers who are affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science. Such institutions include those in academia, industry, or government.
  • The award will be presented to an individual investigator.
  • Institutions or organizations are not eligible for the award.
  • Candidates must not be more than 50 years of age at the time the award is received. For the 2014 award, a candidate's date of birth must be on or after April 10, 1963.
  • Candidates must be engaged in the practice of medicine.

Nomination Procedure and Instructions

Nominations are closed.

Nominations may be made by any scientist, whether an AACR member or nonmember, who is now or has been affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science. Candidates may not nominate themselves.

Selection

Candidates will be considered by a committee of international cancer leaders appointed by the president of the AACR. After careful deliberations by the Award Committee, its recommendations will be forwarded to the Executive Committee of the AACR for final consideration and decision. Selection of the award recipient will be made on the basis of the candidate's contribution to improved clinical care in the field of cancer. No regard will be given to race, gender, nationality, or religious or political views.  

Supporter

Generously supported by the Rosenthal Family Foundation.

Questions?

Linda Stokes, Program Associate
American Association for Cancer Research
615 Chestnut Street, 17th Floor
Philadelphia, PA  19106-4404
awards@aacr.org

SPOTLIGHT

Jedd D. Wolchok, M.D., Ph.D. 38th Annual Award Recipient
Jedd D. Wolchok, M.D., Ph.D.
Lloyd J. Old/Ludwig Chair in Clinical Investigation
Chief, Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
New York, N.Y.


Dr. Jedd D. Wolchok is honored for his contributions to the development of progressively effective immunotherapies for the treatment of melanoma.

After studying fundamental mechanisms of antitumor immunity, autoimmunity, and self-tolerance with Alan Houghton, Dr. Wolchok embarked on a career in the experimental immunotherapy of cancer. He led clinical trials of anticancer vaccine immunotherapy, using DNA encoding xenogenic proteins, like tyrosinase present in most melanoma cells, to evade tumor antigen tolerance. Based on his work, this strategy garnered approval by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) for the treatment of melanoma in dogs, representing the first therapeutic cancer vaccine.
 

Dr. Wolchok earned international recognition for his critical role in the clinical development of ipilimumab, an antibody that undermines immune "checkpoints" to allow more robust activation of T-cell responses to growing cancers. He served as the principal investigator for the pivotal phase 3 trial comparing ipilimumab and dacarbazine versus dacarbazine alone for metastatic melanoma that formed the basis for the approval of ipilimumab (as Yervoy®) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Conduct of the trial necessitated changes in the way subjects with metastatic melanoma were monitored for treatment efficacy versus treatment failure; the antitumor response criteria historically used for cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs proved inadequate for immunotherapy. The trial design and results were described in what has become a landmark paper in the New England Journal of Medicine

He has continued his work to improve anticancer immunotherapy, undertaking a trial of ipilimumab given along with nivolumab, an immune checkpoint inhibitor with a different target. Early trial results hint that this combination may be even more effective that ipilimumab alone, leading to a global phase 3 trial to be directed by Dr. Wolchok.
 

Dr. Wolchok received a bachelor's degree from Princeton in 1987, and earned a master's degree in 1991, a Doctor of Philosophy degree in 1993, and a medical degree in 1994 from New York University. He completed internal medicine residency training at NYU in 1996 and a fellowship in hematology/oncology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in 2000.