American Association for Cancer Research

AACR Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship

Rakesh K. Jain, Ph.D.  Eighth Annual Award Recipient
Rakesh K. Jain, Ph.D.
A.W. Cook Professor of Tumor Biology
Director, E.L. Steele Laboratory
Department of Radiation Oncology
Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Mass.


Dr. Jain will deliver his award lecture titled Reengineering the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Cancer Treatment: Bench to Bedside to Biomarkers at the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif. The award ceremony and lecture will be held on Monday, April 7, 2014, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the San Diego Convention Center. Visit the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 page for more information.

  • View the list of all prior lectureship recipients.

  • Learn more about the 2014 award recipient.


The Lectureship

The AACR Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship was established and first presented in 2007 in honor of the late Princess Takamatsu of Japan. During her extraordinary life, Her Imperial Highness Princess Takamatsu expended tremendous efforts toward the public and humanitarian cause of the eradication of cancer. She is regarded as an honored and respected figure in Japan, the United States, and within the international cancer research community as a whole.  

Learn more about Princess Takamatsu.

This lectureship will recognize an individual scientist whose novel and significant work has had or may have a far-reaching impact on the detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of cancer, and who embodies the dedication of the princess to multinational collaborations. The recipient of the Eight Annual Lectureship will present a major, 50-minute lecture during the AACR Annual Meeting 2014 in San Diego, Calif., USA (April 5-9, 2014).

The lecturer will receive an unrestricted honorarium of US $10,000, support for the recipient and a guest to attend the AACR Annual Meeting, and a commemorative item serving as tangible witness to the singular honor of his/her selection.

Eligibility Criteria

  • Candidacy is open to all cancer researchers who are affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science anywhere in the world. Such institutions include those in academia, industry, or government.
  • The lectureship will be presented to an individual investigator.
  • Institutions or organizations are not eligible for the lectureship.

Nomination Procedure and Instructions

Nominations are closed.

Nominations may be made by any scientist, whether an AACR member or nonmember, who is now or has been affiliated with any institution involved in cancer research, cancer medicine, or cancer-related biomedical science. Candidates may not nominate themselves.

Selection

Candidates will be considered by a Selection Committee of international cancer leaders appointed by the president of the AACR. Selection of the lecturer will be made on the basis of the novel and significant work, its far-reaching impact on the detection, diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of cancer, and his or her embodiment of the dedication of the princess to multinational collaborations. No regard will be given to age, race, gender, nationality, geographic location, or religious or political views. After careful deliberations by the committee, its recommendations will be forwarded to the Executive Committee of the AACR for final consideration and decision.

Supporter

Generously supported by the Princess Takamatsu Cancer Research Fund (Japan).

Questions?

Linda Stokes, Program Associate
linda.stokes@aacr.org

American Association for Cancer Research
615 Chestnut Street, 17th Floor
Philadelphia, PA 19106-4404


SPOTLIGHT

Rakesh K. Jain, Ph.D. Eighth Annual Award Recipient
Rakesh K. Jain, Ph.D.
A.W. Cook Professor of Tumor Biology 
Director, E.L. Steele Laboratory 
Department of Radiation Oncology 
Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital
Boston, Mass.


Dr. Rakesh K. Jain, who is also the Andrew Werk Cook professor of tumor biology (radiation oncology) at Harvard Medical School, is being recognized for his pioneering work in tumor biology and his leadership in developing diverse international collaborations and training the next generation of scientists.

Dr. Jain is renowned for his work characterizing the abnormal state of blood vessels within tumors and for proposing and then validating the groundbreaking hypothesis that “normalizing” the network of blood vessels in a tumor can improve treatment outcomes. In testing his hypothesis he made discoveries that fundamentally changed understanding about the ways in which anticancer therapeutics called antiangiogenic agents work. Developed to prevent tumor blood vessels from forming, Jain’s research showed that antiangiogenic agents can actually normalize tumor blood vessels in both animal models and cancer patients, and that this improves outcomes for patients.
 

Throughout his career, Dr. Jain has mentored graduate and postgraduate students from around the world from diverse backgrounds, including chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, immunology, radiology, pathology, surgical oncology, engineering, mathematics, and physics, many of whom are now leaders.

Dr. Jain’s contributions to cancer research have been recognized with numerous other accolades, including election to the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine; he is one of only 20 people ever to have been elected to all three U.S. National Academies. He also received the American Society for Clinical Oncology’s Science of Oncology Award in 2012.
 

Dr. Jain received his bachelor’s degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India, and his master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of Delaware in Newark, Del., all in chemical engineering. Prior to joining Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in 1991, Jain was assistant professor of chemical and biomedical engineering at Columbia University in New York, N.Y. (1976-1978), and then rose through the ranks to become professor of chemical and biomedical engineering in 1983 at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa.