American Association for Cancer Research

2006 AACR Minority-Serving Institution Faculty Scholars in Cancer Research

Joseph K. Agyin, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX.

“My research goal is to establish a strong research program in the area of cancer chemotherapy, chemoprevention and drug development with particular emphasis on multiple myeloma, and solid tumors that are metastatic to bone.”

Felix O. Aikhionbare, Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Abstract #4500. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in epithelial ovarian tumors.

“My research goal is to gain a better understanding of the critical role of mitochondrial DNA mutations in ovarian and colorectal tumoriogenesis.”

Wellington K. Ayensu, M.D., Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. Abstract #4963. Gene expressions in mercury-exposed liver cells.

“My research goal is to develop a research proposal on pathways on Immunopathogenesis of diseases associated with xenobiotics with initial emphasis on pesticides and mercury leading to cancer inductions.”

Hirendra N. Banerjee, M.D., Ph.D., Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC.

“I want to be a successful researcher in the field of cancer biology and an ideal teacher and educator to guide undergraduate and graduate students.”

Harvey L. Bumpers, M.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.

“My research goal is to continue basic science research on tumor carcinogenesis during my appointment as a surgical oncologist.”

Cynthia D. Burroughs, Ph.D., Philander Smith College, Little Rock, AR.

“My long range career objective and research goal is to provide an environment to train as well as expose minority students to cancer research.”

Diana S-L. Chow, Ph.D., University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX. Abstract #2138. Scheduling as a factor in combination therapy of a farnesyltransferase inhibitor, Manumycin A, with other cell cycle specific chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

“My research goals are to secure research funding from NCI and to continue making impacts on cancer therapy with formulation efforts. As a Pharmacy faculty I would like to advance to the full professor rank.”

Selina F. Darling-Reed, Ph.D., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL. Abstract # 809. Inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene induced DNA strand breaks by organosulfur compounds (diallyl sulfide, diallyl disulfide and dially trisulfide) in MCF-10A cells.

“My career goal is to spend more time with the students attending FAMU and earn a tenure position. My research goal is to find the ideal chemopreventive agent for breast cancer.”

Surangani Dharmawardhane Flanagan, Ph.D., Universidad Central del Caribe, Bayamon, PR.

“My research goal is to expand my research program to include pre-clinical and clinical testing of natural estrogen mimetics as breast cancer therapeutics and preventives to help develop a cancer education program for medical students. My long-term career goal is to establish and direct a Ph.D. program in cancer cell biology.”

Sakina E. Eltom, D.V.M., Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN.
Abstract #1730. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is over-expressed and constitutively activated in advanced breast carcinoma.

“My research goal is to establish scholarly research in cancer etiology and therapeutics. My career goal is to contribute to the training of minority students in cancer research, as a tool to eradicate disparity in cancer and treatment.”

Ibrahim O. Farah, D.V.M., Ph.D., Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. Abstract # 4062. Differential modulation of intracellular energetics in A549 and MRC-5 cells.

“My career goal is to establish myself as a career scientist and scholar in the area of cancer biology with special emphasis in modulation cellular energeties in cancer.”

Brenda M. Green-Jarvis, Ph.D., Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN.

“My research goal is to adapt imaging methods that are clinically useful and practical for preclinical screening of therapeutics and for diagnostic purposes.”

Minnie Q. Holmes-McNary, Ph.D., North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Greensboro, NC. Abstract #373. MeIQx Induces IL-8 Expression in HepG2 Cells.

“My long term goal is to make a significant contribution to the field of cancer research and prevention by bridging two areas based on my dual clinical and academic training as I continue to train students in the growing area of biomedical cancer research.”

Carolyn B. Howard, Ph.D., Jackson State University, Jackson, MS.

“My long-range career objectives are to continue to conduct breast cancer research, to seek and acquire R01 funding, and to enhance my training through extramural experiences and increased research collaborations.”

Chien-An Hu, Ph.D., University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM.

“My career goal is to be successful in both cancer research and education. My research goal is to understand the molecular bases of cancer biology and to use gained knowledge in translational research.”

Duane E. Johnson, Ph.D., Dillard University, New Orleans, LA.

“My long-range career objectives are to become a senior clinical scientist with a focus in cancer research. My long-term goal is to develop a group of novel anticancer drugs that may reach phase I clinical trials and ultimately obtain FDA approval.”

Govind J. Kapadia, Ph.D., Howard University, Washington, DC.
“My research goal is to develop medicinal agents in the field of cancer chemoprevention, cancer chemotherapy and antimalarial agents.”

James W. Lillard, Jr., Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Abstract #289. CXCR5-CXCL13 expression regulates cellular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer cell invasion and correlates with prostate cancer progression.

“My long-range career objectives are to be actively involved in full-time academic research and teach while contributing to the biotechnology enterprises that may result from my research efforts of those of the institution.”

Elijah O. Okegbile, Ph.D., Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL. Abstract #4804. Down regulation of nitric oxide release by antioxidants in ovarian cancer cell proliferation.

“My career goal is to be a renowned researcher in Biomedical Studies. My research goal is to find the chemopreventive methods in cancer and ultimately alleviate the problems related to cancer.”

Babatunde O. Oyajobi, M.D., Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX.

“My long-term career objectives are to establish a strong and vibrant extramurally-funded cancer research program that is nationally recognized and to mentor high school, undergraduate and graduate students to acquire research skills.”

KiTani A. Parker-Johnson, Ph.D., Dillard University, New Orleans, LA.

“My long-range career objective is to become a strong basic scientist using bioinformatics as a tool to select gene(s) differentially expressed as cancer cells become transformed.”

Heather L. Poetschke Klug, Ph.D., University of Texas at Brownsville and Texas Southmost College, Brownsville, TX. Abstract # 4809. Immunocompetency and non-melanoma skin cancer in aging persons.

“My long-term research goal is to identify early biomarkers of waning immune function that predict higher risk in cancer patients and for use as prevention and/or treatment targets.”

Farah A. Ramírez-Marrero, Ph.D., University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR.

“To achieve excellence as a teacher it is important that I learn the results of cutting edge research and the techniques used to reach the results, its strengths and limitations, and also the applications to health and the improvement of quality of life.”

Kinfe K. Redda, Ph.D., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL.

“My research is fully engaged in the design, synthesis and pharmacological activity evaluations of several heterocyclic compounds for the development of anticancer and anti-HIV agents. My long-term objective is to synthesize a safe, less expensive and effective product that could be used for the treatment of HIV and lung cancer.”

Sakeenah Y. Sadrud-Din, Ph.D., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee, FL.

“I plan to continue to investigate the possibility of using natural products (garlic in particular) as chemoprevention of cancer.”

Gary L. Sanford, Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Abstract #1476. Both cyclooxygenase-2 and nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms may be critical for breast cancer progression to metastasis.

“My long term career objective is to establish a stable academic research program that will also provide for the research training of students at all levels. My research goal presently is to develop the research efforts of my laboratory toward understanding the roles of COX-2 and nitric oxide in mediating the early stages of breast cancer metastasis.”

Shailesh Singh, Ph.D., Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Abstract #2464.CC chemokine receptor-9 and its natural ligand CCL25, regulates cellular mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression.

“My research goal is characterization of cellular and molecular mechanisms dictated by chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions in prostate cancer, cell migration, invasion and metastasi.”

Barbara A. Wilson, Ph.D., Jackson State University, Jackson, MS. Abstract #5213. H&E and ICP-MS quantification of As75 and Cd110 and Cd111 isotope mass in rat kidneys following chronic low-dose exposure to As203 and CdCl2 mixtures.

“My goals are to compete for competitive peer-reviewed grant awards and to establish a long-term research collaboration with colleagues in cancer research.”

Teshome E. Yehualaeshet, Ph.D., D.V.M., Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL.

“My research goal is to explore the common denominators of dog mammary tumor and human breast cancer.”

Mustafa Younis, Dr.P.H., Jackson State University, Jackson, MS.

“My research goal is to learn about SEERS data and examine issues related to cancer and Medicare patients, disparities and cancer centers.”

Beatriz Zayas, Ph.D., Universidad Metropolitana, San Juan, PR.

“As a researcher, I hope to provide the scientific community with valuable knowledge that can guide into the discovery of new anticancer drugs.”