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FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>

Modernizing Population Sciences in the Digital Age

Program 

Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019

Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019

Friday, Feb. 22, 2019 


Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019

Welcome and Opening Keynote Address

5-6:15 p.m.

Welcome
Melissa L. Bondy, Baylor College of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

Opening Keynote Address
Opportunities in technology and connected health for population science
Warren Kibbe, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

Opening Reception
6:15-8:15 p.m.

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Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

Breakfast
7:30-8:30 a.m.

Plenary Session 1: Utilization of Social Media, Apps, and Mobile Technology for Participant,Engagement, Recruitment, and Follow-up 
Session Chair: Sophia S. Wang, City of Hope, Duarte, California
8:30-10:45 a.m.

Cancer prevention and control using mobile and social media tools: Disruptive leaders in the field
Sheana Bull, University of Colorado Denver and Anschutz Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado

Data-Driven Recruitment: Implementation of digital marketing strategies for improved participant response rates and retention
Jennifer Benbow, City of Hope, Duarte, California 

Examining the #HPV vaccine on Instagram: An analysis of post context, imagery, and sentiment*
Amy Leader, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Using web-based tools to assess familial cancer risk in diverse populations*
Heather S. Feigelson, Kaiser Permanente Institute for Health Research, Denver, Colorado

Supporting post-mastectomy breast reconstruction choices through personalized risk prediction and a decision support tool*
Mary C. Politi, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

Break
10:45-11 a.m. 

Plenary Session 2: Real-time Exposure Measurements 
Session Chair: Marc T. Goodman, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Los Angeles, California
11 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Incorporating mobile health technology into a prospective cohort study to measure environment, physical activity, and sleep
Peter James, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts

Wearable sweat sensor for personalized health monitoring
Wei Gao, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California

Validity and utility of high-resolution wearables in observational and interventional research
Job G. Godino, University of California, San Diego, California

Feasibility of assessing individual’s diet using a web-based dietary assessment tool, ASA24, in a longitudinal observational study*
Yikyung Park, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri

Lunch (on own)
1-3 p.m.

Special Lunch Session
A new NCI funding opportunity has been published for early-stage postdocs who wish to pursue careers as independent cancer researchers, and those in data and population sciences are especially encouraged to apply. Mentors and potential applicants (including international students and postdocs) are invited to learn more about this new pilot program and other funding opportunities offered by NCI. 
Michele McGuirl, Center for Cancer Training, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland
2-3 p.m.

Plenary Session 3-Part I: Leveraging Publicly Available Data for Research and Clinical Use: From Data Linkages to Machine Learning
Session Chair: Melissa L. Bondy, Baylor College of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
3-5:30 p.m.

Improving researcher accessibility to publicly available data through creative integration, geospatial visualization, and open data portals
Ming Tsou, San Diego State University, San Diego, California
Caroline A. Thompson, San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Date science techniques for understanding your cancer catchment area
Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio

Finding, accessing, interoperating with, and reusing clinical data in artificial intelligence ppplications
Lucila Ohno-Machado, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

Artificial intelligence or artificial inelegance - The state of AI in cancer diagnostics
Martin C. Stumpe, Google, Mountain View, California

A prospective cohort study embedded into integrated health care systems in the US to study cancer etiology, prevention, and early detection 
Stephen J. Chanock, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Dinner on own

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Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019

Breakfast
7:30-8:30 a.m. 

Plenary Session 3-Part II: Leveraging Publicly Available Data for Research and Clinical Use: From Data Linkages to Machine Learning  
Session Chair: Melissa L. Bondy, Baylor College of Medicine, Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
8:30-9:45 a.m.

Use of administrative and electronic health records to identify cancer recurrences 
Christopher I. Li, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington

Linking heterogeneous data to enable knowledge discovery in health care
Tina Hernandez-Boussard, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Utilizing electronic fertility clinic records and registry linkage to establish a retrospective population-based cohort study to evaluate the association between in vitro fertilization (IVF) and subsequent cancer risk in women*
Britton Trabert, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Plenary Session 4: mHealth-Mobile Technologies for Interventions and Health Messaging
Session Chair: Peter Kraft, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
9:45-11:15 a.m.

Mobile virtual human healthcare guides for young adult childhood cancer survivors
Albert Rizzo, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Donna Spruijt-Metz, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Precision behavior change via digital health technologies
Eric B. Hekler, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

Harnessing mHealth/digital health tools to power patient centered approaches to precision medicine in oncology
Rashmi Lakshminarayana, Medopad, London, England

Poster Session and Lunch
11:15-1:30 p.m.

Plenary Session 5: Data Integration and Analytics
Session Chair: Marc T. Goodman, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Los Angeles, Califronia
1:30-3:15 p.m.

How digital disintermediation (“apps”) and cloud computing change the precision prevention landscape
Jonas Almeida, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York

EHR-based tools and algorithms for managing cardiovascular risk among survivors
Randi Foraker, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri

California Teachers Study (CTS) Data Management Platform: A model for a repeatable turnkey, end-toend, cloud-based data management and analytics solution for epidemiology cohorts
Sandeep Chandra, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California

Geocoding and integrating multiple environmental exposomics sources: Assessing population hazard to lung carcinogens in 421 zip-codes of a cancer center catchment area*
Thomas McKeon, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Break
3:15-3:30 p.m.

Plenary Session 6: Practical Guide for Modernizing ongoing Studies-Pitfalls and Success Stories from the Field
Session Chair: Sophia S. Wang, City of Hope, Duarte, California
3:30-5:15 p.m.

Leveraging modern data science to optimize discovery within epidemiologic treasures: Case study - The
nurses' health study
Francine Grodstein, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts

Insights from Adopting a Data Commons Approach: The California Teachers Study
James V. Lacey, City of Hope, Duarte, California

Opportunities and lessons learned from the Cancer Research Network
Lawrence H. Kushi, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California

Device-based, objective measurement of physical activity and sedentary behavior in a large U.S. cohort*
Alpa V. Patel, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia

Break
5:15-5:30 p.m.

Second Keynote Address
A modern
data commons approach to advance population science
Anthony Kerlavage, Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology, Rockville, Maryland

5:30-6:30 p.m.

Dinner on own

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Friday, Feb. 22, 2019

Breakfast
7:30-8:30 a.m. 

Plenary Session 7-Part I: Practical Guide for Launching a New Study-Reports from the Field
Session Chair: Peter Kraft, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
8:30-11 a.m.

Participatory design of digital health tools for patients and clinicians in cancer research: Examples from two field studies
Katherine Kim, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

Early progress on the All of Us research program
Joshua C. Denny, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

Title to be announced
Deborah Schrag, Project GENIE, Dana Farber Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

An innovative approach to improve clinical trials using adaptive in silico design
Judy Barkal, M2Gen, Tampa, Florida

Linking electronic health records with cancer registry data for epidemiology and health services research: challenges and opportunities*
Caroline Thompson, San Diego State University, San Diego, California

Field Application of Digital Technologies for Health Assessment in the 10,000 Families Study*
Bharat Thyagarajan, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Plenary Session 7-Part II: Close-Out Session: An Open Panel Discussion and Q&A on the Scientific Efforts of the Future 
Session Chair: Peter Kraft, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts
11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Closing Remarks
12:00 p.m.

*short talks from proffered abstracts

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