Close
FINDING CURES TOGETHER<sup>SM</sup>

Advances in Pediatric Cancer Research

​Program 

Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019

Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019

Friday, Sept. 20, 2019 


Tuesday, Sept. 17

Opening Plenary Session
5-6:30 p.m.

Pediatric neuro-oncology: What's next?
Stefan M. Pfister, Hopp Children's Cancer Center at the NCT Heidelberg (KiTZ) and German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

Three-hit model of Wilms tumor formation reveals immunogenic transcriptional subtypes*
Kenneth Chen, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas

Generation of the first genetically defined tumorigenic model of Ewing Sarcoma expressing EWS-FLI1*
Nilay Shah, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

Opening Reception
6:30-8 p.m.

Top of page


Wednesday, Sept. 18

Continental Breakfast with Networking Roundtables
7-8 a.m.

Plenary Session 1: Cancer Predisposition and Surveillance
Session Chair: David Malkin, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
8-10:15 a.m.

Sex ratio disparities and the risk of childhood cancer: Evaluating the mediating effect of birth defects among 15,000 childhood cancer cases*
Erin Marcotte, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Novel strategies for early cancer detection and prevention: The Li-Fraumeni Syndrome story
David Malkin

Medulloblastoma predisposition according to molecular subgroup: The usual suspects and beyond
Paul A. Northcott, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

New approaches to study cancer predisposition syndromes
Christian P. Kratz, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

Circulating tumor DNA as a tool for prognostication, translational discovery, and early cancer detection
Brian Crompton, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

New strategies for multi-dimensional molecular characterization and follow-up of high risk pediatric cancers
Gudrun Schleiermacher, Institut Curie, Paris, France


Break
10:15-10:30 a.m.


Plenary Session 2: Immunotherapy I – Cellular Therapies 
Session Chair: Crystal L. Mackall, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Next generation CAR T cells to overcome resistance
Crystal L. Mackall

Improving remission durability after CAR T cell therapy
Terry J. Fry, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado

Immunotherapeutic approaches for pediatric solid tumors
Rupert Handgretinger, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany

Locoregionally administered B7H3-targeting CAR T cells mediate potent antitumor effects in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor*

Johanna Theruvath, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California

T cell receptor (TCR) based immunotherapy in pediatric malignancy: Addressing the challenge of early metastasis and low immunogenicity*
Stefan Burdach, Department of Pediatrics and Children's Cancer Research Center, Technical University of Munich School of Medicine and CCC München - Comprehensive Cancer Center, DKTK German Cancer Consortium, Munich, Bavaria, Germany

Lunch on Own
12:30-2:30 p.m.


Plenary Session 3: Immunotherapy II – Immune Checkpoint Inhibition and Tumor Microenvironment
Session Chair: Paul Sondel, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin
2:30-4:30 p.m. 

Activating innate and adaptive immunity to improve outcome for "COLD" tumors
Paul Sondel

Overcoming immune evasion in pediatric brain tumors
Robert J. Wechsler-Reya, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, California

Re-balancing the immune milieu in the early metastatic microenvironment
Rosandra N. Kaplan, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

The immunogenomic landscape of pediatric primary solid tumors*
Arash Nabbi, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada

GD2 is a macrophage checkpoint molecule and combined GD2/CD47 blockade results in synergistic effects and tumor clearance in xenograft models of neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma*
Robbie Majzner, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California


Special Session 1: Lightning Lectures
Session Chair: David Malkin, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
4:30-4:45 p.m.
Lightning Lectures highlight the top research that will be presented as posters. Select abstracts from Poster Session A will be featured in this session. Presenters will have one minute to present one slide to highlight their most exciting finding. We invite you to discuss these in greater depth during the poster session.

Prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in children with high-risk cancer*
Noemi Fuentes-Bolanos, Kid's Cancer Center, Sydney, NSW, Australia

A comprehensive and integrative omic analysis of multiply relapsed refractory pediatric pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia predicts response to CD19 CAR T cell therapy*
Katherine Masih, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland

Glypican-2 targeted CAR T-cells designed to effectively eradicate endogenous site density solid tumors in the absence of toxicity*
Sabine Heitzeneder, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California

Development of FGFR4 specific Chimeric Antibody Receptor (CAR) T cell and Bispecific T Cell Engager (BiTE) for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) immunotherapy*
Adam Cheuk, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Targeted sequencing in 388 patients with high-risk or recurrent/refractory pediatric extra-cranial solid malignancies: An interim report from the GAIN Consortium/iCat2 Study*
Laura Corson, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

BMI1 constitutes a novel therapeutic vulnerability in fusion-positive rhabdomyosarcoma*
Robert Schnepp, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

Charting the synthetic lethality landscape in pediatric cancer to advance whole-exome precision-based treatments*
Fiorella Schischlik, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Defining the transcriptional regulation of pediatric AML as a new strategy to find potential druggable vulnerabilities*
Joanna Yi, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

EphB2 a potential therapeutic target for pediatric medulloblastoma*
Yuchen Li, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

Zero childhood cancer (ZERO): A comprehensive precision medicine platform for children with high-risk cancer*
Vanessa Tyrrell, Children's Cancer Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia

Validation of potential therapies for treatment of fatal pediatric brain tumors DIPG and AT/RT using a novel rapid intracranial model in zebrafish*
Harpreet Kaur, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Overcoming challenges in healthcare with machine learning: Innovation from retinoblastoma*
Isabella Janusonis, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada


Poster Session A / Reception
4:45-7:15 p.m.

Top of page


Thursday, Sept. 19

Continental Breakfast with Networking Roundtables
7-8 a.m.


Plenary Session 4: Molecularly Targeted Therapies
Session Chair: Gilles Vassal, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France
8-10 a.m.

Molecular targeted therapies and precision medicine for children with neuroblastoma and other refractory malignancies
Michelle Haber, Children’s Cancer Institute, Randwick, NSW, Australia

Molecular profiling in the clinic: Moving from feasibility assessment to evaluating clinical impact
Katherine A. Janeway, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Tissue agnostic development of TRK inhibitors for pediatric cancer
Theodore Laetsch, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas

Accelerating innovation for children with cancer in the new regulatory environment
Gilles Vassal


Break

10-10:30 a.m.


Plenary Session 5: Pathways of Oncogenesis I: ‘Omics
Session Chair: Kimberly Stegmaier, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

From functional genomics to new targets in pediatric oncology

Kimberly Stegmaier

Clinically relevant mutational signatures in childhood cancer

Adam Shlien, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada

Genomic analysis of osteosarcoma: Insights in to tumor evolution and therapy response

E. Alejandro Sweet-Cordero, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

Neuronal activity promotes proliferation of normal and neoplastic glial cells

Michelle L. Monje, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California


Special Session 2: Lightning Lectures
Session Chair: David Malkin, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
12:30-12:50 p.m.
Lightning Lectures highlight the top research that will be presented as posters. Select abstracts from Poster Session B will be featured in this session. Presenters will have one minute to present one slide to highlight their most exciting finding. We invite you to discuss these in greater depth during the poster session.

A C19MC-LIN28A-MYCN oncogenic circuit driven by hijacked super-enhancers is a distinct therapeutic vulnerability in ETMRs—a lethal brain tumor*
Iqra Mumal, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada

MECOM dysregulation is associated with poor outcome in pediatric therapy-related myeloid neoplasms*
Tamara Lamprecht, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

Genomic classification and prognosis in rhabdomyosarcoma: A report from the Children’s Oncology Group, the Institute of Cancer Research, and the National Cancer Institute*
Javed Khan, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Beyond synthetic lethality: Multiple mechanisms can explain genetic interactions within childhood cancer*
Josephine Daub, Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, Netherlands

Ewing Sarcoma: A case study of clonal aneuploidy and DNA damage repair in pediatric cancer*
Xiaofeng Su, Koch Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

A CRISPR/Cas9 domain screen identifies a small motif in the PAX3-FOXO1 transactivation domain relevant for tumor maintenance in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma*
Marco Wachtel, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

CATACOMB: An endogenous inducible gene that antagonizes H3K27 methylation activity of Polycomb Repressive complex 2 via a H3K27M-like mechanism*
Andrea Piunti, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

EWS-FLI1 orchestrates Ewing sarcoma plasticity through a post-translational modification cascade regulating FOXM1 stability*
Heinrich Kovar, St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute, Vienna, Austria

Liaison between SNAI2 and MYOD enhances oncogenesis and suppresses differentiation in fusion-negative rhabdomyosarcoma*
Myron Ignatius, Greehey Children's Cancer Research Institute, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas

Modeling a pathogenic SAMD9 mutation in human induced pluripotent stem cells*
Jason Schwartz, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

Mutant RAS represses CASZ1, a novel regulator of MYOD and MYOG, to inhibit embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma differentiation*
Zhihui Liu, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Overexpression of TLX3 or HOXA9 in association mutant IL7Rα are sufficient to generate T-ALL in vivo*
Gisele Rodrigues, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland

Validation of a model of pedriatric leukemia based on pluripotent stem cells using mass cytometry*
Joan Domingo Reines, Pfizer/University of Granada/Junta de Andalucía, Granada, Spain

Characterizing vascular invasion in hepatoblastoma*
Sarah Woodfield, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

Dissecting the heterogeneity of metastatic neuroblastoma cells by single-cell RNA-seq*
Alice Shan, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Investigating the role of tumor:bone microenvironment crosstalk in Ewing sarcoma progression*
Kelsey Temprine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Epigenomics and single-cell sequencing define a developmental hierarchy in Langerhans cell histiocytosis*
Caroline Hutter, St. Anna Children's Cancer Research Institute, Vienna, Austria

Spatial and temporal conditions for Smarcb1 deletion determines mouse AT/RT (Atypical teratoid/Rhabdoid tumor) subtype*
Zhi-Yan Han, institut Curie, Paris, France

Three distinct subgroups of Wilms tumors with novel molecular features and important clinical implications are defined by genome-wide DNA methylation profiles*
Jack Brzezinski, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada


Poster Session B / Lunch
12:50-3:15 p.m.


Top of page


Plenary Session 6: Pathways of Oncogenesis II: Basic Biology
Session Chair: E. Alejandro Sweet-Cordero, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
3:15-5:15 p.m.

Blocking purine synthesis in cancer promotes response to immunotherapy
Ayelet Erez, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel

Tumor cells highjack diverse cellular processes to maintain redox balance
Poul H.B. Sorensen, BC Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Lessons from a rare childhood cancer syndrome on replication repair deficiency and hypermutation
Uri Tabori, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada

Lactate dehydrogenase A is a pharmacologically tractable EWS-FLI1 transcriptional target that regulates the glycolytic dependence of Ewing sarcoma*
Christine Heske, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

STAG2 mutations alter topological organization of the genome and cis-mediated interactions*
Didier Surdez, Institut Curie, Paris, France


Special Session 3: Hot Topics in Pediatric Cancer Research from Highly Rated Abstracts 
Session Chair: Adam Shlien, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
5:15-6:30 p.m.

Disruption of IL6-mediated paracrine signaling to prevent pulmonary metastasis*
John Hinckley, The Ohio State University, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

EP300 controls the oncogenic enhancer landscape of high-risk neuroblastoma*
Adam Durbin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

IL6-mediated self-seeding functions to prevent osteosarcoma metastasis*
Amy Gross, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio

Surgical excision of the primary tumor in osteosarcoma model results in enhanced metastatic growth by modulating the lung immune microenvironment*
Michelle Kallis, The Elmezzi Graduate School of Molecular Medicine, Northwell Health, Karches Center for Oncology, The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Manhasset, New York

Ewing sarcoma cells exploit the IL1RAP-CTH axis to drive oxidative stress adaptation and lung metastasis*
Haifeng Zhang, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada


Friday, Sept. 20

Continental Breakfast with Networking Roundtables
7-8 a.m.


Plenary Session 7: Survivorship Research
Session Chair: Gregory T. Armstrong, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee
8-9:45 a.m.

The lifetime impact of cancer and cancer therapy
Gregory T. Armstrong

Optimizing cancer survivorship outcomes with intervention, dissemination and implementation research
Tara O. Henderson, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

The need for evidence-based survivorship care
Leontien C.M. Kremer, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, Netherlands

Acting at a distance: Medulloblastoma secreted ligands disrupt normal neural stem cell function*
Alexander Gont, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada


Break

9:45-10:15 a.m.


Plenary Session 8: Tumor Heterogeneity
Session Chair: Sam Behjati, Wellcome Sanger Institute, Cambridge, United Kingdom
10:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m.

Comprehensive transcriptomic characterization of 1,400 sarcomas for diagnosis and immune contexture*
Julien Vibert, Institut Curie, Paris, France

Immunogenomic landscape of pediatric solid malignancies*
Jun Wei, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Patient-derived organoids in pediatric cancer research
Jarno Drost, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology, Utrecht, Netherlands

Tumour uniformity
Sam Behjat

Developmental and oncogenic programs in pediatric brain tumors dissected by single-cell RNA-sequencing
Mariella G. Filbin, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Using single-cell, high-dimensional approaches to unravel tumor heterogeneity in pediatric cancer
Kara L. Davis, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California

Stalled developmental programs at the root of K27M mutant gliomas and other pediatric brain tumors
Nada Jabado, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada


Closing Remarks
12:45-1 p.m. 


*Short talk from proffered abstract


Top of page