Faruk Mohammed, MS

Faruk Mohammed, MS

Cancer Scientist/Graduate Student, Department of Pathology
Ahmadu Bello University
Zaria, Nigeria

I am a cancer scientist in the Department of Pathology at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU) in Zaria, Nigeria and an honorary cancer scientist at ABU Teaching Hospital Shika in Zaria, Nigeria. I have trained as a cancer research scientist under the mentorship of Professor Emeritus Paul Nelson (late) and under the supervision of Dr Ian Nichol at the University of Wolverhampton. I am the principal investigator at ABU sites for the collaboration between ABU Zaria and University of Florida; ABU Zaria and Tuskegee University; and, ABU Zaria and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University. In addition, I am the principal investigator at ABU Zaria for the US NCI and University of Florida collaborative study titled “NGS of Archived FFPE Tissues from Men of African Descent;” the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard collaborative study titled “Molecular Characterisation of Cancer;” the University of Florida and NCI EGRP Prostate Cancer Transatlantic Consortium multi-institutional collaborative study titled “Prostate Cancer Familial Project” which focuses on the prostate cancer burden and risk factors in Nigerian men and Nigerian men in the diaspora; and, the Tuskegee University, Alabama collaborative study titled, “A precision Medicine Study of How Inflammation May Underlie the Excessive Burden of Prostate Cancer in Men of African Ancestry.” I am a recipient of the Japanese Cancer Association (JCA) Meritorious Cancer Presentation Award (JCA/AACR Tokyo, Japan in July, 2016) and the first representative from an African University to present cancer research findings in the JCA Conference since its inception.

Cancer affects people of all races and ethnicities, globally. However, Blacks suffer disproportionately from cancer and its associated effects, including high mortality and this is more pronounced in the sub-saharan African countries. My research interests include: 1) cancer health disparities and prostate cancer genomics in African/black populations; 2) the role of human endogenous retroviruses in cancer; and, 3) the role of dietary fibre and/or aspirin on BIRC7 as a chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer. My longterm goal is to contribute to a significant decrease in cancer incidence and morbidity across the African continent and beyond via research and education.