Luis G. Carvajal-Carmona, PhD

Luis G. Carvajal-Carmona, PhD

Associate Professor, Genome Center and Department of Biochemistry
UC Davis
Davis, California

Dr. Luis Carvajal-Carmona, is an associate professor at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) who specializes on cancer genetics, epidemiology, and cancer health disparities. He obtained his doctorate from University College London (UK), carried out postdoctoral training at the Cancer Research UK London Research Institute (now part of The Francis Crick Institute) and was a senior research fellow at the University of Oxford before taking his faculty position at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Carvajal-Carmona has received funding from multiple agencies in Europe (Cancer Research UK, European Union, GSK Oncology) and the U.S. (V Foundation, NIH). He is a member of the CHSA Study Section (2017-2021), a member of the Steering Committee of the Molecular Epidemiology Working Group (2016-2018) at the AACR and the associate director of UC Davis T32 Biotechnology Training Program.

Dr. Carvajal-Carmona has discovered several cancer susceptibility genes and has published over 70 publications in influential journals such as Nature Genetics, Gastroenterology, American Journal of Human Genetics and PNAS. His has received awards and fellowships from the European Association for Cancer Research, The University of Oxford and the V Foundation. In addition to his passionate pursuit for scientific research, Dr. Carvajal-Carmona is a keen supporter of a diverse biomedical research force and has mentored several first-generation students and members of under-represented groups in biomedical research.

At the MICR council, Dr. Carvajal-Carmona will actively work to find training and mentoring opportunities for members of under-represented groups in cancer research. He will also work with the council to start conversation with funding organizations to develop opportunities that lead to better training and funding for early-stage and new investigators who are members of under-represented groups in biomedical research.