Sarki A. Abdulkadir, MD, PhD

Sarki A. Abdulkadir, MD, PhD

Director
Northwestern University
Chicago, Illinois

Sarki A. Abdulkadir MD, PhD, is the John T. Grayhack, MD, chair of urological Rresearch, professor of urology and pathology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and co-director of the Chicago Prostate SPORE at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Abdulkadir received the combined undergraduate and medical degrees from Ahmadu Bello University in Nigeria in 1990. After a year of medical internship, he moved to the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute predoctoral fellow, receiving the PhD in immunology in 1995. He subsequently completed a residency in clinical pathology integrated with a postdoctoral research fellowship in prostate cancer at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, in 2000. 

Dr. Abdulkadir’s research program is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms that drive prostate cancer initiation, progression and recurrence with the ultimate goal of developing therapies that interfere with these processes. His approach includes the genomic analysis of human tumors from diverse populations, cell culture studies and the use of genetically engineered animal models of human cancer. He has a strong interest in genomics and gene regulation; oncogenic kinases as molecular therapeutic targets; as well as the use of in vivo lineage tracing to define the fates of specific cell populations in tumorigenesis. Dr. Abdulkadir has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health since establishing his laboratory in 2001, is widely published and has received several awards, including the National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Minority Biomedical Branch Rising Star Award. He is an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation. Dr. Abdulkadir has a keen interest in training the next generation of investigators and scientists, and has trained several individuals that have gone on to independent research and teaching careers.