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CICR at the Annual Meeting

 

Virtual Meeting
Week 1: April 10-15; Week 2: May 17-21

The AACR Annual Meeting program covers the latest discoveries across the spectrum of cancer research—from population science and prevention; to cancer biology, translational, and clinical studies; to survivorship and advocacy—and highlights the work of the best minds in research and medicine from institutions all over the world.

TM01. Chemistry in Cancer Research Working Group (CICR) Town Hall Meeting

Monday, May 17, 2021, 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm EDT
CICR Chair Philip Jones. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
CICR Chair-Elect Joachim Rudolph. Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA

Jennifer C. Petter. Arrakis Therapeutics, Waltham, MA
Drugging RNA with small molecules

Benjamin L. Ebert. Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA
Targeted protein degradation: drugging the “undruggable”

Daniel Nomura. University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA
Reimagining druggability using chemoproteomic platforms

Immediately following the session from 5:00-6:00 p.m. EDT, all attendees are invited to participate in a one-hour Zoom (version 5.3 or higher required) networking session available through the following URL: https://www.aacr.org/CICR


Be sure to watch the AACR Award for Outstanding Achievement in Chemistry in Cancer Research Lecture presented by recipient Cynthia Wolberger, PhD on demand starting April 10th on the AACR online meeting platform.


ED005. Chemistry to the Clinic, Part 1: Strategies in Developing Safer Oncology Drugs

Wednesday, May 19, 2021, 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm EDT
Channel 03
The number one priority for most oncologists in treating cancer patients is often efficacy. Efficacy trumps safety for cancer therapeutics because the life-threatening nature of cancer diseases. As a result, many cytotoxic agents have been approved and widely used in cancer treatment. With significant progress made in drug discovery in recent years, some deadliest cancers have succumbed to safe and efficacious therapies and transformed into chronic diseases. This session is therefore designed to educate and inspire more strategies in developing safer oncology drugs. Cancer patients rely on us to keep tipping the balance towards more benefit and less risk.

Chairperson Xiaojing Wang. Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA

Adam Renslo. University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA
Tumor targeting based on oncogenic changes to iron speciation and homeostasis

Guangrong Zheng. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Using PROTAC approach to address the platelet toxicity associated with Bcl-xL inhibitors

Kevin Freeman-Cook. Pfizer, Inc., San Diego, CA
Developing isoform selectivity in the design of CDK2 inhibitors

ED006. Chemistry to the Clinic, Part 2: Induced Proximity in Drug Discovery– Protein Degradation and Beyond

Thursday, May 20, 2021, 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm EDT
Channel 03
Inducing biomolecular interactions with synthetic molecules to impact biological function is a rapidly evolving paradigm in chemical biology and drug discovery. By bringing together two proteins that would not normally interact, control can be gained over protein fate, localization, and function, impacting cellular signaling and homeostasis. This session will illustrate this concept, advances made over the recent years and emerging future directions. Dr. Potts will explore the use of induced proximity medicines for targeted degradation of proteins and RNAs as a novel therapeutic modality in drug discovery; Dr. Hall will discuss the development of RNA PROTACs in which the recognition domain comprises the RNA binding element; and Dr. Narla will describe small molecule modulators of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) that promote biased heterotrimerization resulting in desphohorylation and degradation of several key oncogenic drivers in cellular and in vivo model systems.

Chairperson Zoran Rankovic. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN

Ryan Potts. Amgen R&D, Thousand Oaks, CA
Induced proximity medicines for targeted degradation of proteins and RNAs

Jonathan Hall. ETH Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland
A new targeting strategy for RNA-binding proteins (RBPs)

Goutham Narla. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Small molecule mediated biased activation of the PP2A tumor suppressor complex

ED007. Chemistry to the Clinic, Part 3: Progress in Ligand Discovery Technologies for Poorly Tractable Targets

Tuesday, May 18, 2021, 1:45 pm – 3:15 pm EDT
Channel 03
Oncology drug targets are becoming increasingly more difficult to drug as we are shifting, often based on compelling genetic validation data, towards enzyme targets with unique ligandability challenges (e.g. GTPases, phosphatases), transcription factors, and other historically undrugged target classes. Small-molecule modulation of these targets is often no longer possible with conventional reversible ligands and requires unique new approaches, such as covalency, allostery, degradation, or targeting at the level of the RNA. This session will highlight the challenges that we are facing and how they are being conquered with new emerging drug modalities.

Chairperson Margaret Porter Scott. Genentech, South San Francisco, CA

Melanie Leveridge. GlaxoSmithKline, Hertsfordshire, Stevenage, United Kingdom
Tractability- what is it, why is it important: An overview of technologies to help us tackle targets in the ‘red zone’

Angela N. Koehler. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, Cambridge, MA
Targeting transcriptional complexes

Benjamin F. Cravatt. The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA
Activity-based proteomics: Covalent ligand and target discovery on a global scale


See more on the online meeting planner.



Don’t forget to view CICR sessions from Week 1 of the 2021 Annual Meeting!


DDT03. New Drugs on the Horizon: Part 1

On Demand
This is one of three Chemistry in Cancer Research (CICR)-sponsored New Drugs on the Horizon Symposia. These sessions offer the opportunity for Annual Meeting attendees to see the first disclosures of twelve innovative agents, both small molecules and biologics that have recently entered, or imminently will enter, into phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. All presentations will reveal the chemical or biologic structure of the agent under investigation, key highlights of the drug discovery program, and ongoing clinical development plans. The New Drugs on the Horizon sessions have always proven to be an excellent opportunity to learn about the next wave of innovative cancer drugs progressing in the clinic.

Chairperson Andrew J. Phillips. Cormorant Asset Management, LLC, Boston, MA
Chairperson James E. Audia. Northwestern University – Evanston, Chicago, IL
Liangxing Wu. Incyte Corporation, Wilmington, DE
Nicholas J. Keen. Bicycle Therapeutics, Lexington, MA
Pablo Umana. Roche Glycart AG, Schlieren, Switzerland
Travis Young. Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA

DDT01. New Drugs on the Horizon: Part 2

On Demand
This is one of three Chemistry in Cancer Research (CICR)-sponsored New Drugs on the Horizon Symposia. These sessions offer the opportunity for Annual Meeting attendees to see the first disclosures of twelve innovative agents, both small molecules and biologics that have recently entered, or imminently will enter, into phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. All presentations will reveal the chemical or biologic structure of the agent under investigation, key highlights of the drug discovery program, and ongoing clinical development plans. The New Drugs on the Horizon sessions have always proven to be an excellent opportunity to learn about the next wave of innovative cancer drugs progressing in the clinic.

Chairperson Philip Jones. UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
Chairperson Chudi Ndubaku. ORIC Pharmaceuticals, South San Francisco, CA
Elisabetta Leo. AstraZeneca Oncology, Cambridge, United Kingdom
David Dornan. Bolt Biotherapeutics, Redwood City, CA
Jenny Karlsson. Bayer US Healthcare, Oslo, Norway
Theresa Kolben. F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Penzberg, Germany

DDT02. New Drugs on the Horizon: Part 3

On Demand
This is one of three Chemistry in Cancer Research (CICR)-sponsored New Drugs on the Horizon Symposia. These sessions offer the opportunity for Annual Meeting attendees to see the first disclosures of twelve innovative agents, both small molecules and biologics that have recently entered, or imminently will enter, into phase I clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. All presentations will reveal the chemical or biologic structure of the agent under investigation, key highlights of the drug discovery program, and ongoing clinical development plans. The New Drugs on the Horizon sessions have always proven to be an excellent opportunity to learn about the next wave of innovative cancer drugs progressing in the clinic.

Chairperson Joachim Rudolph. Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA
Chairperson Laura Akullian D’Agostino. Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge, MA
Robert L. Hoffman. Pfizer Global Research & Development, San Diego, CA
G. Leslie Burnett. Revolution Medicines, Inc., Redwood City, CA
A. Robert Macleod. Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc., Carlsbad, CA