Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter

Transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter forms in the renal pelvis and ureter. The renal pelvis is the top part of the ureter. The ureter is a long tube that connects the kidney to the bladder. The renal pelvis and ureters are lined with transitional cells. These cells can change shape and stretch without breaking apart. Transitional cell cancer starts in these cells.

Misuse of certain pain medicines can affect the risk of transitional cell cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter. Smoking cigarettes and exposure to certain dyes and chemicals used in making leather goods, textiles, plastics and rubber are risk factors for these cancers.

According to the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program estimates, renal pelvis cancer and kidney cancer combined will be diagnosed in some 73,820 people and about 14,770 people will die of these diseases in the United States in 2019.

Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter Treatment (PDQ®)

Source: National Cancer Institute