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Sunil Hingorani and the Small Patients

Sunil Hingorani and the Small Patients

At the start of his career, Sunil Hingorani, MD, PhD, now at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, had a life-altering experience in caring for a patient with pancreatic cancer. A grant from the AACR in 2005 led him into an investigation that changed his approach to the disease.

Cancer as Hurricane: Heiko Enderling’s Models

Cancer as Hurricane: Heiko Enderling’s Models

In 2008, an AACR Centennial Postdoctoral Fellowship Award enabled Heiko Enderling, PhD, to build a mathematical model that could explain some of the dynamics of cancer stem cells. This research yielded several other papers and helped Dr. Enderling compete for a position at Moffitt Cancer Center, where he currently serves as an Associate Professor, Integrated Mathematical Oncology, Radiation Oncology.

Patrick Ma: Undaunted by Two Pandemics

Patrick Ma: Undaunted by Two Pandemics

In 2003, Patrick Ma, MD, received the AACR-AstraZeneca-Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation fellowship and used it to study c-Met mutations in lung cancer and the therapeutic potential of targeting c-Met. He's now leader of the multidisciplinary thoracic oncology disease team at the Penn State Cancer Institute. Read how the AACR fellowship helped launch his career.

Expecting the Unexpected

Expecting the Unexpected

Growing up in Australia, Charles Mullighan knew he wanted to be a doctor but never thought about working in Memphis, Tennessee. But that is exactly where he ended up, at a hospital named for the patron saint of impossible causes.

From Viruses to a Global View

From Viruses to a Global View

With a little help from the AACR, a fascination with cancer-associated viruses has turned into a successful career in research for Blossom Damania, PhD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – a career that has gone global with research projects on four continents.

When a Grant Means “More than Money”

When a Grant Means “More than Money”

Kimberly Kelly, PhD, the CEO of a biotech startup called ZielBio, received an AACR-PanCAN Career Development Award for Pancreatic Cancer Research as one of the first grants of her independent academic career. The value of the grant, she says, is more than the money.