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AACR Releases Policy Guidance on Tobacco and Cancer Clinical Trials117636/2/2014 6:03:46 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx320False2013-04-09T11:47:00Z<div class="ExternalClass021B4942A46145BFA8A8FA00E6061083"><p> WASHINGTON, D.C. — An American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) statement calls on the oncology community to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation treatment for all cancer and cancer-screening patients and to evaluate tobacco as a confounding factor in cancer clinical trial outcomes. The statement was published this morning in <em>Clinical Cancer Research</em>, a journal of the AACR. <br><br>Tobacco use is the single largest preventable cause of cancer in the United States, and smoking cessation treatment has long been regarded as a key cancer prevention strategy. However, research has shown that such treatment is often lacking in oncology settings. <br><br>A survey of National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer centers indicated that only 38 percent of the responding centers record smoking as a vital sign, and less than 50 percent have dedicated tobacco cessation personnel. These findings are unfortunate, as evidence shows that continued tobacco use during and after cancer treatment leads to more adverse side effects, poorer treatment outcomes and higher overall mortality from all causes. <br><br>“We have made great strides in treating cancer, and people are living for decades after a cancer diagnosis,” said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), chief executive officer of the AACR. “If, however, we do not address patient’s tobacco use, then we leave them at risk for failing cancer treatment, developing new malignancies, and premature death from non-cancer causes such as cardiovascular disease. With this statement, we call on all oncology professionals to take responsibility for identifying tobacco users at every visit and ensuring that these patients get the treatment and support they need.”<br><br>In addition to compromising their treatment and overall health, continued smoking by patients with cancer can complicate the interpretation of clinical trial outcomes. “Tobacco, like other drugs, has adverse side effects and can interfere with the effectiveness of cancer treatments,” said Roy Herbst, M.D. Ph.D., chair of the AACR Subcommittee on Tobacco and Cancer and chief of medical oncology at Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center in New Haven, Conn. “We have to get to a point in clinical trials where we factor a patient’s tobacco use into how we evaluate patient outcomes, just like we do with other drugs or comorbidities. Right now, the field is not doing that with any regularity.” <br><br>A recent evaluation of 155 NCI Cooperative Group trials showed that as few as 29 percent of registered trials assessed any form of tobacco use in patients at enrollment, and less than 5 percent of registered trials assessed tobacco use during follow-up.&#160; In addition, a newly published large survey of oncologists demonstrates that while 90 percent believe that tobacco use affects cancer outcome and that tobacco cessation should be a standard part of cancer care, only 40 percent regularly provide assistance to stop using tobacco. &#160;<br><br>In the statement issued today, the AACR calls for universal tobacco use assessment and documentation at every patient visit in all clinical cancer settings. “Whether they are being treated in a community oncology setting or as part of a cancer clinical trial, we must help patients end their tobacco addiction, but we can’t do that unless the patient has been identified as a tobacco user,” said Benjamin Toll, Ph.D., program director of the Smoking Cessation Service at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital and chair of the writing committee charged with developing the AACR policy statement. <br><br>AACR’s policy statement was developed by the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the AACR Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee and follows a 2010 policy statement that addressed a broader spectrum of tobacco control and research issues.<br></p><p style="text-align&#58;center;"> # # #</p><p> Follow the AACR on Twitter&#58; <a href="http&#58;//twitter.com/AACR" target="_blank">@aacr</a> <a href="http&#58;//twitter.com/#%21/search/%23AACR" target="_blank">#aacr</a> <br>Follow the AACR on Facebook&#58; <a href="http&#58;//www.facebook.com/aacr.org" target="_blank">http&#58;//www.facebook.com/aacr.org</a></p></div>
AACR Welcomes New Members to the Board of Directors and Nominating Committee 117166/3/2014 8:25:08 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx278False2013-04-04T13:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass123144E6A8B240759691D60DB0B11566"><p> PHILADELPHIA — The members of the American Association for Cancer Research will welcome Carlos L. Arteaga, M.D., as president-elect 2013-2014 on Tuesday, April 9, at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013, held in Washington, D.C., April 6-10. <br><br>Arteaga is professor of medicine and cancer biology at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine where he holds the Donna S. Hall chair in breast cancer research. He serves as associate director for clinical research and director of the Breast Cancer Research Program of the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center in Nashville, Tenn. He will begin serving his one-year term as AACR president in April 2014. <br><br>“Dr. Arteaga is an internationally recognized leader in translational and clinical research,” said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), chief executive officer of the AACR. “His extraordinary expertise in these areas will be a tremendous asset to the AACR as we continue to seek innovative new ways to accelerate the translation of pioneering research discoveries into improvements in patient care. We are delighted to welcome him on board as the new president-elect.”<br><br>In his vision statement, Arteaga vowed to leverage the resources of the AACR to increase and sustain funding of multidisciplinary, multi-investigator, basic science-based translational and clinical research in cancer. Further, he will make it a priority to promote and retain young laboratory-based investigators and physician-scientists in cancer research. <br><br>In addition, the members have elected five distinguished scientists to serve on the AACR Board of Directors for the 2013-2016 term&#58; Mary C. Beckerle, Ph.D.; Michael A. Caligiuri, M.D.; Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D.,; Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D.; and Victor E. Velculescu, M.D., Ph.D.<br><br>Mary C. Beckerle, Ph.D., is chief executive officer and director of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. She is also associate vice president for cancer affairs, distinguished professor of biology and adjunct professor of oncological sciences at the University of Utah. <br><br>Beckerle is currently a member of the AACR Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee and served as a scientific lecturer at the Meet-the-Expert Session, “Genesis and Impact of Cytoskeletal Changes in Transformed Cells,” at the AACR Annual Meeting 2011.<br><br>Michael A. Caligiuri, M.D., is chief executive officer of the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. He is also director of The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center; vice president for health sciences, cancer programs; chair in cancer research at the John L. Marakas Nationwide Insurance Enterprise Foundation; and professor in the departments of molecular virology, immunology, medical genetics and internal medicine at Ohio State University.<br><br>Caligiuri is currently chairperson of the AACR Publications Committee and a member of the Council of Scientific Advisors, the Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee, the Clinical and Translational Cancer Research Committee and the steering committee for the Cancer Immunology Working Group. He was also chairperson for the Annual Meeting Program Committee in 2009 and a member of the editorial boards of Molecular Cancer Therapeutics and Clinical Cancer Research.<br><br>Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D., is president of The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam and professor in molecular genetics at the Academic Biomedical Center at the University of Utrecht, in Utrecht, Netherlands. <br><br>Clevers has served on several AACR selection committees including the AACR-Princess Takamatsu Memorial Lectureship Selection Committee, the Landon Basic Prize Selection Committee and the Laboratory Research Awards Selection Committee. He was also on the editorial board of Molecular Cancer Research.<br><br>Elizabeth M. Jaffee, M.D., is a professor of oncology and pathology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md., active staff in oncology at Johns Hopkins Hospital, associate director for translational research and co-director of the Gastrointestinal Cancers Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins. She is also medical director of the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Cell Processing and Gene Therapy Facility, deputy director of the Institute for Translational and Clinical Research and on the faculty of the graduate programs in immunology, cellular and molecular medicine, and pharmacology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.<br><br>Jaffee is currently chairperson of the AACR Cancer Immunology Working Group and a member of the Tumor Microenvironment Working Group and the Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee. She has served as co-chairperson of Mentored Grants and Research Fellowships and of the special conferences, “Tumor Immunology&#58; Multidisciplinary Science Driving Basic and Clinical Advances” and “Tumor Immunology&#58; Basic and Clinical Advances.” She was also an associate editor of Cancer Research and member of the editorial boards of Clinical Cancer Research and Molecular Cancer Therapeutics. <br><br>Victor E. Velculescu, M.D., Ph.D., is professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, co-director of the Cancer Biology Program at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and director of cancer genetics at the Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University. <br><br>Velculescu is chairperson of the AACR Basic Cancer Research Grants Scientific Review Committee and a member of the Education and Training Committee. Additionally, he was a member of the Annual Meeting 2012 Program Committee, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation-AACR Grants for Translational Breast Cancer Scientific Review Committee and was a keynote speaker at the 2007 International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development.<br><br>On Tuesday, April 9, at 7 a.m. ET, during the AACR Annual Meeting Business Meeting, the AACR leadership will induct Charles L. Sawyers, M.D., as president of the AACR. <br><br>Sawyers is chair of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, N.Y., and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is also a professor in the Cell and Developmental Biology Program at the Joan and Sanford I. Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences of Cornell University. He is co-leader of the Stand Up To Cancer-Prostate Cancer Foundation Prostate Cancer Dream Team&#58; Precision Therapy of Advanced Prostate Cancer, and is scientific editor of Cancer Discovery.<br><br>Sawyers will succeed Frank McCormick, Ph.D., F.R.S., D.Sc. (hon.), director of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. McCormick holds the E. Dixon Heise distinguished professorship in oncology and the David A. Wood distinguished professorship of tumor biology and cancer research at UCSF. Additionally, he is the associate dean of the UCSF School of Medicine and a distinguished professor in residence in the department of microbiology and immunology as well as in the department of biochemistry and biophysics.<br><br>McCormick served with distinction as AACR president for the 2012-2013 term and will assume the role of past-president (2013-2014). <br><br>In addition, the following renowned scientists have been elected to serve as members of the Nominating Committee for the 2013-2015 term&#58; Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Ph.D.; Kenneth W. Kinzler, Ph.D.; Scott W. Lowe, Ph.D.; and Martine J. Piccart, M.D., Ph.D.<br><br>Elizabeth Blackburn, Ph.D., is the Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology and Physiology in the departments of biochemistry and biophysics, and microbiology and immunology at the University of California, San Francisco. <br><br>Blackburn, recipient of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, is currently scientific editor of Cancer Discovery, deputy editor of Cancer Prevention Research and a member of the Stand Up To Cancer Scientific Advisory Committee, the AACR Cancer Prevention Committee and the Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee. Blackburn has also served as AACR president from 2010 to 2011, chairperson of the Margaret Foti Award for Leadership and Extraordinary Achievements in Cancer Research Selection Committee, co-chairperson of the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2011 Writing Committee, keynote speaker at the 2010 AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research and chairperson of the AACR Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research Committee. She was also on the board of directors (2006-2009) and a senior editor of Molecular Cancer Research.<br><br>In addition, Blackburn will be inaugurated into the first class of the Fellows of the AACR Academy during the Annual Meeting.<br><br>Kenneth W. Kinzler, Ph.D., is director of the Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.<br><br>He is currently a member of the Fight Colorectal Cancer-AACR Award Selection Committee and the Publications Committee. Kinzler has served as chairperson of the Editor-in-Chief Search Committee for Molecular Cancer Research and the AACR Laboratory Research Awards Selection Committee. He was also a member of the board of directors (2008-2011).<br><br>Scott W. Lowe, Ph.D., is an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, member of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and chair of the Geoffrey Beene Cancer Research Center at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, NY. He is also adjunct associate professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at Stony Brook University School of Medicine in Stony Brook, N.Y. and an adjunct professor at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.<br><br>Lowe is chairperson of the AACR International Conference on Frontiers in Basic Cancer Research 2013. He was a co-committee member and keynote speaker at the 2011 AACR-Japanese Cancer Association joint conference, “The Latest Advances in Liver Cancer Research&#58; From Basic Science to Therapeutics,” chairperson of AACR Laboratory Research Awards Selection Committee, chairperson of the special conference, “Mouse Models of Cancer” and a member of the board of directors (2005-2008).<br><br>Martine J. Piccart, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor of oncology at the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Brussels, Belgium, and head of the medicine department at the Institut Jules Bordet in Brussels. She is president-elect and a board member of the European CanCer Organization and president of the European Society for Medical Oncology.<br><br>Piccart is a member of the AACR-Women in Cancer Research Council. She was co-chairperson of the 2010 Annual Meeting Education Committee, the 2010 AACR Dead Sea International Conference on Advances in Cancer Research&#58; From the Laboratory to the Clinic, and the 2004 and 2010 Annual Meeting Program Committees. <br><br>In addition, Piccart will be inaugurated into the first class of the Fellows of the AACR Academy during the Annual Meeting.<br></p><p style="text-align&#58;center;"> # # #</p><p> Follow the AACR on Twitter&#58; <a href="http&#58;//twitter.com/AACR" target="_blank">@aacr</a> <a href="http&#58;//twitter.com/#%21/search/%23AACR" target="_blank">#aacr </a><br>Follow the AACR on Facebook&#58; <a href="http&#58;//www.facebook.com/aacr.org" target="_blank">http&#58;//www.facebook.com/aacr.org</a></p></div>
AACR Welcomes New Members to the Board of Directors and Nominating Committee 1187210/7/2014 8:08:22 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx42False2012-03-20T13:34:00Z<div class="ExternalClassFA77641C267E418F9F333391D37A6375"><p> <br>PHILADELPHIA — The members of the American Association for Cancer Research will welcome Charles L. Sawyers, M.D., as president-elect 2012-2013 on Monday, April 2, at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012, held in Chicago, Ill. from March 31 - April 4. <br><br>Sawyers is chair of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. Additionally, he is a professor in the Cell and Developmental Biology Program and the Department of Medicine at the Joan &amp; Sanford Weill Graduate School of Medical Sciences of Cornell University. He will serve for one year as AACR president, beginning in April 2013. <br><br>“Dr. Sawyers is a tremendous asset to the AACR and the cancer research community. His extraordinary experience in translational and clinical research will be extremely valuable to the AACR as we continue to accelerate the translation of exciting basic research for the benefit of cancer patients. The AACR is excited to welcome him on board,” said Margaret Foti, Ph.D., M.D. (h.c.), chief executive officer of the AACR. <br><br>Sawyers’ vision statement for his term emphasized his great concern about the federal budget for cancer research and his desire to work with the AACR and its members to raise awareness among its nation’s political leaders and general public about the importance to public health.<br><br>“We must educate our leaders, and the public, that this is absolutely the wrong time to compromise on cancer research funding,” he said. “Our voices must be heard, and the American Association for Cancer Research is uniquely poised to coordinate on this outcry. It is time to bring this issue to the forefront through a highly coordinated, worldwide plan to ‘occupy’ cancer research.” <br><br>In addition, the members have elected five distinguished scientists to serve on the AACR Board of Directors for the 2012 to 2015 term&#58; Kenneth C. Anderson, M.D., Ph.D. (hon.); Lewis C. Cantley, Ph.D.; Michelle M. Le Beau, Ph.D.; Benjamin G. Neel, M.D., Ph.D.; and Karen H. Vousden, Ph.D.<br><br>Kenneth C. Anderson, M.D., Ph.D. (hon.), is the Kraft Family Professor of Medicine, vice chair of the Joint Program in Transfusion Medicine and research associate of the Center for Blood Research at Harvard Medical School. Anderson is also the director of the Lebow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics, director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center, medical director of the Blood Component Laboratory, attending physician of the Bone Marrow Transplantation Service, associate professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, associate medical director at Brigham and Women’s Hospital Blood Bank and an associate physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Mass. <br><br>He currently serves as a member of the AACR’s Science Policy and Legislative Affairs Committee, the Task Force on Regulatory Science and Policy and the Clinical and Translational Cancer Research Committee. Anderson has served as co-chairperson of the AACR Annual Meeting Program Committee, co-chairperson and member of the Scientific Program Committee for the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference&#58; Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics and a member of the Team Science Award Committee. He is an editorial board member for Molecular Cancer Therapeutics and is editor-in-chief of Clinical Cancer Research, both of which are journals of the AACR. <br><br>Lewis C. Cantley, Ph.D., is director of the Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center in Boston, Mass., professor of systems biology at Harvard Medical School and chief of the Division of Signal Transduction at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.<br><br>Cantley currently serves as co-editor-in-chief for the AACR’s newest journal, Cancer Discovery, along with Jose Baselga, M.D., Ph.D. He is a member of the AACR’s Council of Scientific Advisors, the Special Conferences Committee and the Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research Committee, and was a member of the AACR Outstanding Achievement Award for Breast Cancer Research Committee. Cantley served as a member and co-chairperson of the Annual Meeting Program Committee and the Scientific Committee of the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference&#58; Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics. He was chairperson of the Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research Committee, co-chairperson of the special conference Targeting the PI3-Kinase Pathway in Cancer and co-chairperson of the AACR-ASH Workshop on PI3-Kinase&#58; A Common Pathway for Hematologic Malignancies and Solid Tumors. <br><br>He is the leader of the Stand Up To Cancer Dream Team&#58; “Targeting the PI3K Pathway”; Sawyers, newly elected president-elect of the AACR, is the co-leader of this initiative. AACR is a scientific partner of Stand Up To Cancer. <br><br>Michelle M. Le Beau, Ph.D., is the Arthur and Marian Edelstein Professor in the department of medicine, section of hematology/oncology, director of the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center and director of the Cancer Cytogenetics Laboratory at the University of Chicago. <br><br>Le Beau is a member of the AACR’s Science Policy and Legislative Affairs Committee and has previously served as a member of the AACR-Women in Cancer Research Charlotte Friend Memorial Lectureship Committee, the Publications Committee and the Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research Committee. She is vice president of the Association of American Cancer Institutes. <br><br>Benjamin G. Neel, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Ontario Cancer Institute at University Health Network, which includes The Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute at Princess Margaret Hospital. He is also a professor in the department of medical biophysics at the University of Toronto and holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in signal transduction and disease. <br><br>Neel is the AACR Annual Meeting 2012 Committee chairperson and a scientific editor for Cancer Discovery. His other involvement with the AACR includes&#58; chairperson and member on the Annual Meeting Program Committee, and a member of the Scientific Review Committee for the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference&#58; Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics and the Laboratory Research Awards Committee. He also served as an editorial board member of Cell Growth and Differentiation. <br><br>Karen H. Vousden, Ph.D., is director of the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research in Glasgow, Scotland. <br><br>She is currently a scientific editor for Cancer Discovery, a co-chairperson of the Annual Meeting Program Committee and a Steering Committee member of the Council of Scientific Advisors. She is also a member of Molecular Cancer Research’s editorial board and a member of the AACR’s International Affairs Committee. Vousden has served as a member on the following AACR committees&#58; Annual Meeting Education Committee, Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research Committee, the Task Force on Aging and Cancer and the Scientific Review Committee of the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference&#58; Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics.<br><br>On Monday, April 2, at 12&#58;30 p.m. CT, during the AACR Annual Meeting Business Meeting, the AACR leadership will induct Frank McCormick, Ph.D., F.R.S., D.Sc. (hon.), as president of the AACR. <br><br>McCormick is the director of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. He holds the E. Dixon Heise distinguished professorship in oncology and the David A. Wood distinguished professorship of tumor biology and cancer research at UCSF. Additionally, he is the associate dean of the UCSF School of Medicine and a distinguished professor in residence in the department of microbiology and immunology as well as in the department of biochemistry and biophysics.<br><br>McCormick will succeed Judy E. Garber, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and associate physician of medicine and attending physician of medical service at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Mass. <br><br>Garber served with distinction as AACR president for the 2011 to 2012 term and will assume the role of past-president (2012-2013). <br><br>In addition, the following renowned scientists have been elected to serve as members of the Nominating Committee for the 2012 to 2014 term&#58; Chi Van Dang, M.D., Ph.D.; Susan Band Horwitz, Ph.D.; Matthew L. Meyerson, M.D., Ph.D.; and Martine F. Roussel, Ph.D.<br><br>Chi Van Dang, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Abramson Cancer Center and the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. He is also a professor of medicine and the John H. Glick professor at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.<br><br>He is currently a scientific editor of Cancer Discovery, an editorial board member for Cancer Research and a member of the Publications Committee and the Science Education Committee. He has served as a co-chairperson for the special conference Pancreatic Cancer&#58; Advances and Challenges and the Annual Meeting Program Committee, a member of the AACR Team Science Award Committee, a session chairperson for the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference&#58; Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics and as senior editor and associate editor for Cancer Research.<br><br>Susan Band Horwitz, Ph.D., is the Distinguished University Professor and co-chair in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, and associate director for therapeutics at the Albert Einstein Cancer Center in New York, N.Y. She is also the Rose C. Falkenstein professor of cancer research at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, N.Y.<br><br>Horwitz is an AACR past president and currently serves as a member on the Council of Scientific Advisors. She was a chairperson of the AACR’s Translational Cancer Medicine Meeting; co-chairperson of the educational workshop Translational Cancer Research for Basic Scientists, the Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research Committee and the AACR International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development; and served as faculty for the Scientist↔Survivor Program at the AACR 2009 Annual Meeting. She was a member on numerous AACR committees and the Board of Directors. <br><br>Matthew L. Meyerson, M.D., Ph.D., is a professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School, director of the Center for Cancer Genome Discovery and professor of pathology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Mass.<br><br>Meyerson is currently a member on the AACR Special Conferences Committee and the 2012 Annual Meeting Education Committee, and is a scientific editor for Cancer Discovery. He has served as a co-chairperson or chairperson for the AACR-Japanese Cancer Association Joint Conference, Cancer Genomics, Epigenomics and the Development of Novel Therapeutics; the AACR International Conference on New Horizons in Cancer Research&#58; Biology to Prevention to Therapy; and the AACR International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Joint Conference, The Molecular Origins of Lung Cancer.<br><br>Martine F. Roussel, Ph.D., is a full member in the departments of genetics and tumor cell biology, co-chair of the Cancer Center Signal Transduction Program and endowed chair in molecular oncogenesis at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and is a professor in the department of molecular sciences at the University of Tennessee in Memphis, Tenn. <br><br>Roussel is currently an editorial board member of Molecular Cancer Research. She has served as a chairperson and member of the AACR-Women in Cancer Research Charlotte Friend Memorial Lectureship Committee, co-chairperson and member of the Annual Meeting Program Committee and chairperson of the G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award Committee. Roussel was a member of the Laboratory Research Awards Committee, the Scientific Review Committee of the AACR International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development, the Annual Meeting Education Committee and the Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research Committee, and served as an editorial board member and associate editor for Cancer Research. <br><br> </p></div>
Ken Burns, Siddhartha Mukherjee, SU2C and WETA to Collaborate on Cancer Documentary117871/21/2015 4:39:35 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx342False2013-06-11T18:10:00ZStand Up To Cancer and WETA Washington, D.C. convene unprecedented group of partners to create a national conversation about cancer, including online initiatives and public screenings across the U.S.<div class="ExternalClass2D0302CDBF01497C90D6FDA04CF64DE9"><p>PHILADELPHIA — Siddhartha Mukherjee, M.D., award-winning author of “The Emperor of All Maladies&#58; A Biography of Cancer” (Simon &amp; Schuster 2010), and acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns will collaborate on a new documentary inspired by the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, both parties announced. The film “CANCER&#58; The Emperor of All Maladies” will be directed by the award-winning filmmaker Barak Goodman with Burns as executive producer, and will air on PBS in the spring of 2015.<br><br>Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C), a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF) that works to accelerate innovative cancer research and to increase awareness about progress being made in the fight against the disease, will partner with WETA Washington, D.C., the flagship public broadcasting station in the nation’s capital and production partner on all Ken Burns films, to create a national outreach and engagement campaign surrounding the film. This companion initiative will be one of the largest, most comprehensive educational programs in the history of documentary filmmaking. Elements of the campaign will include educational materials, screenings and conferences, and a robust digital footprint intended to spearhead a national conversation about the history of this disease, the personal experience of those afflicted, groundbreaking research and the quest for a cure.<br><br>Burns and Mukherjee were brought together by WETA President and CEO Sharon Percy Rockefeller soon after she read Mukherjee’s book during treatment for cancer at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.<br><br>“Cancer touches nearly everyone in this country, and public media can play a vital role in educating Americans about this disease. We will illuminate cancer as never before, exploring in depth its history, sharing the experiences of those battling it and offering new hope by spotlighting some of the most extraordinary research being done today,” Rockefeller said. “When I read Sid’s amazing work and met him, I knew he and Ken could create a film that would inform and inspire us all. With Stand Up To Cancer and other key organizations as sponsors and outreach partners — and harnessing the resources, reach and power of the entire public broadcasting system — we will profoundly reshape Americans’ understanding and perception of cancer.”<br><br>Mukherjee had assigned television and film rights to the book to Stand Up To Cancer at the urging of SU2C Co-Founder Laura Ziskin. Ziskin, an award-winning film producer, had hoped to produce a documentary about cancer since the time she was diagnosed with breast cancer, the disease that ultimately took her life in June 2011. Soon after Rockefeller connected with Ziskin in early 2011, planning for the documentary began in earnest.<br><br>The three-part, six-hour film will weave together three different stories&#58; a riveting historical documentary, an engrossing and intimate vérité film that focuses on current patients, and a scientific and investigative report.<br><br>“I am of course honored to have an opportunity to work with such accomplished filmmakers and with such inspiring partners,” Dr. Mukherjee noted. “'Emperor' very much grew out of my experience as a cancer physician trying to navigate and to understand this historic disease. Treating cancer is one of the most significant human challenges we’ve ever faced. But now, for the first time, we are at an extraordinary moment in the history of cancer research because we finally are beginning to understand what causes cancer at a cellular, or molecular, or a genetic level in a way we just did not know ten years ago or even five years ago. This project will provide the public with a clearer vision of where we are in this extraordinary journey.”<br><br>Ken Burns said, “My work as a filmmaker is directly linked to the death of my mother from cancer when I was 11. From the age of three, I watched her suffer and struggle with this awful disease, forever creating for me a desire to explore the past and to listen deeply to the stories that we all have to tell. I was frightened and exhilarated by Sid’s book and thrilled by Sharon’s suggestion that we collaborate to turn this remarkable accomplishment into a film.”<br><br>Barak Goodman, who in addition to directing the film will serve as the series producer, observed, “This is such a rich, historic and still tragic story that it challenges us as filmmakers every day. But it is also a moment of great optimism that at last we may be turning the tables on this disease. I want people to come away from our film with less fear and more hope about the future of cancer.”<br><br>“We applaud Sharon’s vision for this project and know that bringing together the creative forces of Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Ken Burns and Barak Goodman will result in a powerful film,” said Paula A. Kerger, PBS President and CEO. “Leveraging the power of PBS stations, Stand Up To Cancer and other partners, this wide-reaching initiative will create an important dialogue about this terrible disease. This is just the kind of content of consequence that is the hallmark of public media.”<br><br>Integral to the film is the extensive outreach program that will be created by Stand Up To Cancer and WETA, in collaboration with an unprecedented array of partners. Production funders Genentech, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, David H. Koch and Siemens will support project initiatives to expand the reach of the series. Additionally, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) will participate in the effort. The involvement of these two 100+ year-old organizations, each a leader in the fight against the disease, will enable the film to reach an even larger audience, engaging researchers and patients in the national conversation about the topic.<br><br>In the months building up to the national broadcast premiere, the group will organize screenings and discussions in cities across the country, working with local public television stations and a wide range of educational, medical and cancer organizations. In addition, WETA will create a curriculum based on the film that will be shared with teachers in schools throughout the country, and there are plans to provide materials to colleges, universities, and nursing and medical schools, as well.<br><br>The project will also include a robust website — <a title="http&#58;//www.emperorofallmaladies.org" href="http&#58;//www.emperorofallmaladies.org/" target="_blank">www.emperorofallmaladies.org</a> — and social and digital media components. The interactive website will include a mixture of produced and user-generated content that will explore ideas and pose questions that will thrive in the digital space — content that can be engaged with online long before the film airs. While the site will contain vast amounts of useful information, it will not be primarily a medical resource. Instead, it will engage people on the level of personal narrative. The goal is to attract not only the vast cancer community of patients and survivors, family members, caregivers, scientists, and clinicians and other health care providers — but also the public at large.<br><br>“The national outreach for this film will be unprecedented in scope and impact,” said Stand Up To Cancer Co-Founder and journalist Katie Couric. “One in two men and one in three women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetimes. We firmly believe that if we are able to further engage the country in a meaningful conversation about the disease, we can better help the doctors and scientists working 24/7 to end it. Today’s research holds extraordinary promise, and since we are all affected by cancer, it’s important everyone understands that.”<br><br>“CANCER&#58; The Emperor of All Maladies” is a production of Florentine Films, Laura Ziskin Pictures and WETA Washington, D.C., in association with Ark Media. Funding for &quot;CANCER&#58; The Emperor of All Maladies&quot; is provided by Genentech, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, David H. Koch and Siemens. Outreach partners are Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C), a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation; the American Association for Cancer Research; and the American Cancer Society.</p></div>
Congressional Representatives and NCI Acting Director Speak at Cancer Research Policy Forum Hosted by the American Association for Cancer Research and Moffitt Cancer Center123303/25/2016 2:35:04 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx844False2016-03-08T20:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassD45E5C300FA14D0591A1DC2F6F048680"><p>TAMPA, FLORIDA — Several of the nation's top leaders and advocates for cancer research converged in Tampa, Florida, on Monday for a forum hosted by the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and <a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//www.moffitt.org/">Moffitt Cancer Center</a> with support from the <a href="http&#58;//www.aaci-cancer.org/" target="_blank">Association of American Cancer Institutes</a>. The 90-minute &quot;Cancer Research Policy Forum&#58; Progress, Promise, and Challenges in the Era of Precision Medicine&quot; highlighted how federally funded research through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is contributing to the cancer research advances happening at Moffitt and other institutions across the country.</p><p>Douglas R. Lowy, MD, acting director of the <a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//www.cancer.gov/">NCI</a>, was joined by members of the U.S. House of Representatives, Gus Bilirakis and Kathy Castor, on an expert panel of speakers including Thomas A. Sellers, PhD, MPH, Moffitt Cancer Center director; William Dalton, MD, PhD, CEO, M2Gen and chair, AACR Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee; and patient advocate Jacqueline Smith, who discussed the progress being made in cancer research and treatment and the importance of advocating at the federal and local levels. Panelists were united in their calls for robust, sustained, and predictable increases in funding for the NIH.</p><p>&quot;This particular event at Moffitt Cancer Center underscores the importance of organizing such events all across the country to advocate for robust, sustained, and predictable annual budget increases for the NIH and NCI, especially when considering that more than 80 percent of all funding allocated to the NIH and NCI each year is competitively awarded to thousands of laboratory researchers and physician scientists in all 50 states,&quot; said Jon Retzlaff, MBA, MPA, managing director of the AACR Office of Science Policy and Government Affairs. &quot;It was also a wonderful opportunity for the local members of Congress to interact with their constituents at Moffitt Cancer Center and hear firsthand about the exceptional opportunities that exist today to translate our scientific knowledge and understanding into new ways to improve the prognosis and extend the lives of cancer patients.&quot;</p><p>Reps. Bilirakis and Castor, both of whom serve on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, have been outspoken advocates in Congress for medical research funding. Both members worked to include a supplemental, mandatory funding stream for the NIH in the 21st Century Cures legislation that passed the House last summer, and which is currently being debated in the U.S. Senate. They also supported a $2 billion increase for the NIH in last year's appropriations bill. In their remarks, both Bilirakis and Castor emphasized the need for Congress to continue to make medical research funding a national priority.</p><p>Lowy highlighted the progress that has been made both in terms of a decrease in cancer mortality rates and an increase in our ability to prevent cancer through screening and prevention. He provided an update on new programs, including Vice President Joe Biden's national cancer initiative and the Precision Medicine Initiative that, with continued federal investment, have significant potential to increase the pace of progress against cancer.</p><p>&quot;There has always been a tremendous need for funding for cancer research, but now there are tremendous opportunities to make progress that could benefit patients more quickly,&quot; said Lowy while speaking at the forum.</p><p>&quot;It's an incredibly promising time for cancer research. There have been numerous advances in precision medicine, including immunotherapies for melanoma and lung cancers. We are also seeing signs of hope from our leaders in Washington, D.C., first with the Precision Medicine Initiative and now the 'moonshot' initiative to be led by Vice President Joe Biden,&quot; said Sellers.</p><p>Support for early career scientists, the importance of collecting and sharing molecular and clinical data and the need for increased investment in cancer prevention were additional topics of discussion that arose during the open forum with the audience, who filled Moffitt's Couch Auditorium to capacity.</p><p>Dalton added that the complexity of cancer requires a multidisciplinary, &quot;all hands on deck&quot; approach. Dalton, who is the chair of the AACR Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee, also highlighted the work that the AACR has done to advocate for medical research funding, saying that, &quot;without funding for the NIH and NCI, there will be no 'next generation' of researchers.&quot;</p><p>Jacqueline Smith, a 15-year survivor of stage 3 melanoma, shared her experience as a patient who had the opportunity to participate in a clinical trial at Moffitt. As someone who has turned her personal journey with cancer into a lifelong mission to advocate for patients and survivors, she encouraged audience members to speak up and urge elected officials to continue investing in medical research through the NIH.</p></div>
Obesity and Overeating During Menopause Together Promote Breast Tumor Growth and Progression116778/20/2014 4:13:11 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx242False2012-12-07T15:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass0E3D3065BC294BFCA28BBA9B7568A91C"><p> PHILADELPHIA — Obese women might be able to eliminate their increased risk for postmenopausal breast cancer by taking measures during perimenopause to prevent weight gain and to therapeutically control the metabolic effects of their obesity, according to the results of a preclinical study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.<br><br>“Obese postmenopausal women have increased risk for breast cancer and poorer clinical outcomes compared with postmenopausal women who are lean,” said Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colo. “The reasons for this are not fully understood.<br><br>“Unfortunately you cannot do the studies needed to address this issue in humans. So, we merged rat models of obesity, breast cancer and menopause to best mimic the events that link premenopausal obesity to an increased rate of postmenopausal breast cancer.”<br><br>During menopause, women often gain weight because they consume more food than their body needs. In a previous study, MacLean and colleagues used their rat model to show that weight gain following surgical ovariectomy, which models menopause, helped promote breast tumor development in obese rats. <br><br>In this study, they confirmed that obesity and overfeeding after surgical ovariectomy together drove aggressive tumor growth and progression. <br><br>One reason was that obese rats were unable to appropriately handle the excess sources of energy, in the form of glucose and dietary fat, which accumulated as a result of overfeeding after surgical ovariectomy. Lean rats stored the excess glucose and dietary fat from overfeeding in liver, fat, muscle and healthy breast tissue, a normal metabolic response to overfeeding. In contrast, the healthy tissues in obese rats failed to increase uptake of glucose and dietary fat, but the breast tumors dramatically increased uptake of glucose.<br><br>A second reason for the enhanced tumor growth and progression in obese rats compared with lean rats was that tumors from the two groups of animals had different molecular profiles. Tumors from obese rats had higher levels of expression of the progesterone receptor (PR), which was related to higher expression of genes involved in energy use and proliferation. <br><br>A similar pattern of increased expression of genes involved in energy use and cell growth was seen in human PR-positive breast tumors from postmenopausal women. According to MacLean, a final piece of evidence indicating that obesity and overfeeding during the menopausal transition converge to promote tumor growth and progression was that the antidiabetic drug metformin reduced tumor burden in obese rats after surgical ovariectomy. <br><br>“If our findings in rats translate to humans, it means that the perimenopausal period is a critical window of time for determining breast cancer risk later in life,” said MacLean. “This, in turn, means that an obese woman’s risk for postmenopausal breast cancer and poor clinical outcome could be reduced by perimenopausal lifestyle modifications, such as restricting food consumption and increasing exercise, and/or perimenopausal use of drugs, such as metformin, to improve metabolic control.”<br><br>MacLean and colleagues are now testing this hypothesis in the rat model.<br></p></div>
Olaparib and Investigational PI3K Inhibitor BKM120 Combination Active Against Ovarian and Breast Cancer Subtypes121934/21/2015 1:55:37 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx718False2015-04-21T13:35:00Z<div class="ExternalClass9E3092520F604F338E9FF7224260DF00"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Combination treatment with the poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib and the investigational phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor BKM120 was safe and yielded evidence of clinical benefit for women with triple-negative breast cancer and for those with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, according to data from a <a href="https&#58;//clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01623349?term=01623349&amp;rank=1" target="_blank">phase I clinical trial</a> presented at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, held April 18-22.</p><p>“Several years ago, my colleagues on the <a href="/Funding/Pages/sutc-dream-team.aspx?ItemID=12">Stand Up To Cancer [SU2C] Targeting the PI3K Pathway in Women's Cancers Dream Team</a> found that olaparib and BKM120 were more effective in mouse models of BRCA-mutant breast cancer and BRCA-wildtype triple-negative breast cancer than either drug alone,” said <a href="http&#58;//researchers.dana-farber.org/directory/profile.asp?nxtfmt=r&amp;pict_id=0000245" target="_blank">Ursula A. Matulonis, MD,</a> director and program leader of Medical Gynecologic Oncology in the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at the <a href="http&#58;//www.dana-farber.org/" target="_blank">Dana-Farber Cancer Institute</a> in Boston. “Using SU2C funding, we then initiated this clinical trial to test whether the preclinical data would hold true in patients.</p><p>“We are reassured that it is possible to combine olaparib and BKM120 and that we have seen responses in women with triple-negative breast cancer as well as in women with high-grade serous ovarian cancer,” continued Matulonis who is also an <a href="http&#58;//www.dfhcc.harvard.edu/membership/profile/member/1073/0/" target="_blank">associate professor of medicine</a> at Harvard Medical School.</p><p>In the olaparib/BKM120 dose escalation phase of the clinical trial, Matulonis and colleagues have enrolled 46 patients, 12 with breast cancer and 34 with ovarian cancer. Among these patients, 35 were known to have germline BRCA gene mutations. They then enrolled patients with breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the dose expansion phase of the trial after the maximally tolerated dose had been determined.</p><p>According to Matulonis, 10 different dose level combinations of olaparib and BKM120 were tested and the maximum tolerated dose was found to be 50 milligrams once per day of BKM120 plus 300 milligrams twice per day of olaparib. The dose-limiting toxicities of a grade three depression in one patient and a grade four liver function test in another patient were concerning, Matulonis explained, and meant the researchers were able to escalate BKM120 doses to only half of the single-agent dose.</p><p>“It is important that we saw responses against both BRCA-mutant and BRCA-wildtype cancers,” said Matulonis. “We need to do further analysis to identify biomarkers that we can use to more effectively identify the patient population that will be most positively affected by the olaparib/BKM120 combination.”</p><p>Matulonis’ research is funded by the Department of Defense, the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, and the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. The clinical trial was funded by SU2C, the Kathryn Fox Samway Foundation, and discretionary funds from the participating center. Matulonis has received research funding from AstraZeneca and remuneration for attending a speaker’s bureau; she has no Novartis disclosures. </p><p><a href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf" target="_blank">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.</p><p><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#AACR15</a></p></div>
AACR, ASCO, Two Leading U.S. Cancer Organizations, Call for Regulation of E-cigarettes and Other Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems121211/8/2015 2:20:00 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx651False2015-01-08T05:05:00ZRecommendations also focus on efforts to protect minors<div class="ExternalClass3BAB506647674583A07F97E26F3F1BA3"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the <a href="http&#58;//www.asco.org/" target="_blank">American Society of Clinical Oncology</a> (ASCO) have outlined steps in a joint statement to guide policymakers as they work to minimize the potential negative consequences of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and other electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) without undermining their potential to reduce harm as a smoking cessation tool. The two organizations’ recommendations were published in the AACR’s <em><a href="http&#58;//clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2015/01/04/1078-0432.CCR-14-2544.full.pdf+html" target="_blank">Clinical Cancer Research</a></em> and ASCO’s <em>Journal of Clinical Oncology</em>.</p><p>“As a physician-scientist who treats patients with cancer, I am concerned about the delayed time course that’s needed to assess the adverse impacts of ENDS use,” said Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, AACR president, and professor of medicine and cancer biology and director of the Center for Cancer Targeted Therapies and the Breast Cancer Program at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. “Therefore, although we call for additional research to determine with certainty the potential negative public health consequences of these products, particularly in youth, we cannot afford to wait to take prudent steps to stop those under 18 from using e-cigarettes. This is especially important since e-cigarette use is growing fast among this age group, as reported in the most recent National Youth Tobacco Survey.” </p><p>“We are concerned that e-cigarettes may encourage nonsmokers, particularly children, to start smoking and develop nicotine addiction. While e-cigarettes may reduce smoking rates and attendant adverse health risks, we will not know for sure until these products are researched and regulated,” said Peter Paul Yu, MD, FACP, FASCO, ASCO president. “The FDA has signaled its willingness to regulate e-cigarettes and other electronic nicotine delivery systems, and we urge the agency to follow through on this intention.”</p><p>According to the statement, tobacco use constitutes the largest preventable cause of death and disability in developed countries and is a rapidly growing health problem in developing nations. It is responsible for 30 percent of all cancer deaths and is associated with increased risk for at least 18 types of cancer. E-cigarettes and other ENDS, which are capable of delivering a nicotine solution in aerosolized form, have been promoted as potential tobacco cessation products and safer alternatives to combustible cigarettes. At the present time, however, insufficient data exist on the health consequences of ENDS use and their value as tobacco cessation aids.</p><p>Unlike combustible cigarettes and many other tobacco products, e-cigarettes and other ENDS are not currently regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Some state and local governments have enacted e-cigarette regulations, including imposing restrictions on the sale of e-cigarettes to minors and prohibiting use of e-cigarettes in public places. Federal regulations have yet to be adopted, and manufacturing standards and quality controls on e-cigarettes are also absent. The statement calls on federal policymakers to immediately implement these recommendations, most specifically the ones that are aimed at restricting the sale, distribution, marketing, and advertising of ENDS to youth. </p><p>Noting that additional research is needed to inform the regulation of e-cigarettes and other ENDS, the AACR and ASCO statement outlines steps that can be taken now in the interest of public health. Specifically, the policy recommendations include the following&#58;</p><ul><li>The FDA Center for Tobacco Products should regulate all ENDS that meet the statutory definition of tobacco products. ENDS that do not meet the statutory definition of tobacco products should be regulated by the FDA through other appropriate authorities.</li><li>ENDS manufacturers should be required to register with the FDA and report all product and ingredient listings, as well as the nicotine concentration in the ENDS solution.</li><li>ENDS packaging and advertising should be required to carry safety labels that include a warning regarding nicotine addiction.</li><li>All youth-oriented ENDS advertising and marketing should be prohibited.</li><li>Internet and other mail-order sellers of ENDS should be required to check the age and identification of customers at the point of purchase and delivery.</li><li>Childproof caps should be required for all e-liquid containers.</li><li>ENDS and ENDS liquid-containing candy and other youth-friendly/youth-oriented flavors should be banned unless there is evidence demonstrating these products do not encourage youth uptake. </li><li>ENDS use should be prohibited in places where combustible tobacco product use is prohibited by federal, state, or local law until the safety of secondhand aerosol exposure is established. </li><li>Funding generated through tobacco product taxes, including any potential taxes levied on ENDS, should be used to help support research on ENDS and other tobacco products, and should not preclude the allocation of federal funding for this research.</li><li>All data related to ENDS composition, use, and health effects should be disclosed for dissemination and should inform policy decisions for ENDS product regulation.</li><li>State and local governments should implement ENDS regulations appropriate for protecting the public’s health, including restricting the sale, distribution, marketing, and advertising of ENDS to youth. </li></ul><p>In addition, the AACR and ASCO encourage all oncologists to recommend FDA-approved cessation medications instead of e-cigarettes to individuals who are interested or trying to quit smoking combustible cigarettes. </p><p>“Further research and regulation are needed to determine if e-cigarettes can help people stop smoking combustible cigarettes,” said Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Ensign professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, and chief of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital, who served as chair of the joint AACR/ASCO committee that developed the statement. “In the meantime, oncologists should encourage patients to use FDA-approved cessation medications, refer them for smoking cessation counseling, and provide education about the potential risks and lack of known benefits of long-term e-cigarette use.” </p><p>For more information on this subject from the AACR, visit <a href="/ADVOCACYPOLICY/GOVERNMENTAFFAIRS/PAGES/RECOMMENDATIONS-FOR-THE-REGULATION-OF-ELECTRONIC-CIGARETTES.ASPX">www.AACR.org/e-cigs</a>. Additional information on ENDS, as well as oncologist-approved tobacco cessation resources can be found on ASCO’s patient information website, Cancer.Net, at <a href="http&#58;//www.cancer.net/tobacco" target="_blank">www.cancer.net/tobacco</a>. </p></div>
​AACR Thanks President Obama and Vice President Biden for Their Strong Commitment to Cancer Research and Biomedical Science in State of the Union Address123101/13/2016 2:12:21 AMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx826False2016-01-13T02:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass2C0602D0D32F49C6950EF79B95F8EE4E"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) applauds and commends President Obama and Vice President Biden for their dedication in the fight against cancer discussed during tonight’s State of the Union address.</p><p>The AACR looks forward to working with the administration and Congress to make faster progress against cancer so that we might achieve the goal that Vice President Biden outlined during his speech in the Rose Garden Oct. 21, 2015, specifically that now is the time to make an “absolute national commitment to end cancer as we know it today.”</p><p>“We have indeed reached an inflection point, where the number of discoveries that are being made at such an accelerated pace are saving lives and bringing enormous hope for cancer patients, even those with advanced disease,” said AACR President José Baselga, MD, PhD, physician-in-chief and chief medical officer at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “Now is the time for a major new initiative in cancer science that supports and builds upon our basic science foundation while translating these exciting scientific discoveries into improved treatments for cancer patients, such as in the areas of genomics, precision medicine, and immuno-oncology. Tonight’s State of the Union address underscores the importance of collaborations if we are to achieve the vision that President Obama has outlined.”</p><p>To that end, on Jan. 8, a group of 15 AACR members, led by Baselga and comprising a number of AACR Board Members, and other AACR leaders from nine states and 10 of the top cancer centers and medical institutions in the U.S., met with Vice President Biden’s senior staff to discuss the state of cancer research, as well as Vice President Biden’s commitment to leading in this important issue.</p><p>As the world’s first and largest scientific organization committed to preventing and curing all cancers through innovative research, education, communication, and collaboration, the AACR and its 39,000 members are unified in their interest of working alongside the President Obama, Vice President Biden, and Congress to end cancer.</p><p>“The AACR has consistently advocated for robust, sustained, and predictable funding increases for the NIH and NCI, as well as for science-based, patient-centered cancer science and public policies that will make quantum leaps forward toward improving the health of all Americans,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR.&#160; </p><p>“There are 14.5 million cancer survivors who are alive today because of cancer research, and tonight’s announcement has the potential to dramatically increase this number,” said Dr. Foti. “The AACR also wishes to thank all of the dedicated patient advocates for their vital role in providing the patient perspective on cancer and for emphasizing to the general public the opportunities in cancer research that are before us today.”</p><p>The AACR has played and continues to play a pivotal role in the national dialogue in the quest to cure and prevent cancer in partnership with the administration, Congress, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). </p><p>“In a hopeful era, we need hopeful leaders, so we applaud the President and Vice President’s commitment to change the face of cancer as we know it,” Douglas R. Lowy, MD, acting director of the National Cancer Institute. “Thanks to many years of work by dedicated cancer researchers, we have, within our reach, real opportunities to prevent, successfully treat, or even eliminate many forms of cancer in adults and children. The National Cancer Institute stands ready to realize the administration’s efforts, support the American Association for Cancer Research and other cancer leaders, and change the future for all affected by cancer.”</p></div>
Stand Up To Cancer Canada Announces New Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team To Attack Brain Cancer in Children and Adults123202/4/2016 2:21:54 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx835False2016-02-04T15:15:00ZPan-Canadian Team of Researchers Will Receive CA$11.7 Million in Funding from Stand Up To Cancer Canada, Genome Canada, Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Cancer Stem Cell Consortium, and Ontario Institute for Cancer Research<div class="ExternalClass8B9B52A27FA3419E8477C680703A8CA2"><p>TORONTO – A team of top Canadian scientists, including leading pioneers of stem cell research, was named today to lead a new attack on brain cancers in children and adults, using genomic and molecular profiling technologies to focus on the cancer stem cells that drive the growth of tumors.</p><p>“Brain tumors are not as common as many other forms of cancer, but they are devastating, especially when they strike the very young,” said Phillip A. Sharp, PhD, Nobel laureate and institute professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and co-chair of the Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) Canada Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC). “The Dream Team will bring new insights to brain cancer research, which has been an underfunded area.”</p><p>The leader of the SU2C Canada Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team&#58; Targeting Brain Tumor Stem Cell Epigenetic and Molecular Networks, is Peter B. Dirks, MD, PhD, neurosurgeon and senior scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto, who was the first to identify cancer stem cells in brain tumors in 2003. The co-leader is Samuel Weiss, PhD, director of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute and professor in the Cumming School of Medicine at the University of Calgary, who was awarded the Canada Gairdner International Award in 2008 in part for his discovery of adult neural stem cells in the brains of adult mammals. </p><p>“Stem cells and cancer stem cells were discovered in Canada,” said Alan Bernstein, OC, PhD, president and chief executive officer of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR) and co-chair of the SU2C Canada SAC. “By bringing together a top-flight team of scientists and clinicians from across Canada and applying what we have learned about brain cancer and cancer stem cells, our hope is that novel treatments will be developed.&#160;Treatments that will extend the lives of patients, and give new hope to children and their parents, as well as adults who struggle with these devastating diseases.” </p><p>Funding of CA$11.7 million&#160;over four years is being provided by SU2C Canada, Genome Canada, the Canadian Institutes of&#160;Health Research (CIHR), the Cancer Stem Cell Consortium (CSCC), and the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research (OICR), which will provide up to CA$1.2 million for clinical trials in the province of Ontario.&#160;The American Association for Cancer Research International – Canada is SU2C Canada’s scientific partner. </p><p>“Brain tumors in children and adults contain a small number of cells called stem cells that resist treatment and continually regenerate, driving tumor growth and recurrence after initial responses to treatment,” Dirks said. “Our team will conduct multiple analyses of brain cancer stem cells, profiling their biological makeup to identify drugs that are likely to block the uncontrolled growth of the tumors, and carry out clinical trials across Canada to find the safest and most effective drugs to treat these cancers.”</p><p>Federal ministers welcomed the new Dream Team. </p><p>“My heartfelt congratulations to the Dream Team researchers who are collaborating to pave the way to better and faster cancer treatments for Canadians and people around the world,” said the Honorable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science. “In supporting the Dream Team, the Government of Canada is investing in promising discoveries that could improve the outcome of patients who live with brain cancer.”</p><p>“Canada is a leader in stem cell research, and the Dream Team is carrying on this proud tradition,” said the Honorable Jane Philpott, Minister of Health. “I am optimistic that this team of top Canadian scientists has what it takes to find new ways of fighting brain tumors and improve the lives of children and adults living with brain cancer.”<br>&#160;<br>“Ontario is proud to support leading researchers, including top stem cell scientists, through the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research. Finding new and innovative ways to treat brain cancer in children and adults brings hope to patients and their families,” said the Honorable Reza Moridi, Ontario Minister of Research and Innovation.</p><p>The team will focus on glioblastomas in adults and children and on posterior fossa ependymomas of infants, both of which have a dismal outlook for patients and for which treatment options are limited. Less than 10 percent of adults are living five years after a glioblastoma diagnosis. In children, cancers of the brain and central nervous system are the No. 1 pediatric cancer killer, even though leukemia is the more common pediatric cancer. </p><p>“It’s like a Peter Pan syndrome, in which the immature cell, the stem cell, never grows up,” said Michael D. Taylor, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon and senior scientist at SickKids who specializes in cancer genomics, epigenetics, and chromatin biology, and serves as a principal investigator on the team. “Our objective is to take those cancer stem cells and convince them to quit multiplying and leave the rest of the brain alone.” </p><p>“This Dream Team approach not only brings together the best researchers from across Canada, but integrates pediatric and adult brain cancer research. Pediatric cancer research is often essential to inform adult cancer research,” added Taylor, who also serves as a principal investigator on the U.S.-based SU2C-St. Baldrick’s Foundation Dream Team on childhood cancers. </p><p>Researchers have found that these cancers contain brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs). While similar to nerve stem cells that mature during normal brain development, abnormal programming in BTSCs allows them to drive tumor relapse (or the ability of the tumors to grow back again) and drug resistance. The Dream Team’s goal is to understand the abnormalities in BTSCs so that they can identify vulnerabilities that can be used to develop new drugs that are effective against brain cancers.</p><p>To achieve this goal, the Dream Team will take a three-pronged approach to understanding and targeting brain cancer stem cells that resist treatment and fuel tumor regrowth. Their first approach is to perform detailed analysis of BTSCs taken from 70 different glioblastomas or ependymomas and grown in the laboratory. They will use cutting-edge technology to understand the full biological profile of these cells – from changes in the cells’ genetic codes to epigenetic programs that control when genes are turned on or off and alterations in the way the cells metabolize nutrients.</p><p>The Dream Team’s second approach will be to screen a collection of chemicals on the same BTSCs for potential new drugs and drug combinations that are effective against these cells. Finally, while they are learning about the biology of BTSCs and screening for new compounds, the Dream Team will test five new potential drugs that they have already identified as very promising by tests performed in laboratory mice to find out which drugs or drug combinations might kill glioblastomas or ependymomas. The Dream Team hopes to bring new drugs for brain cancer into clinical trials in the third and fourth years of their research funding.</p><p>“Our understanding of brain cancer stem cells and their role in causing tumors to grow is advancing very rapidly, with significant contributions coming from Canadian scientists that are part of this exciting new Dream Team,” Weiss said. “Our proactive, data-sharing approach, coupled with strategic partnerships with multiple, major pharmaceutical companies, will help accelerate the search for effective treatments.”</p><p>In addition to Dirks, Weiss, and Taylor, the team’s principal investigators are&#58; </p><ul><li>Cheryl H. Arrowsmith, PhD, senior scientist at the University Health Network (UHN) in Toronto (structural and chemical biology); </li><li>Gary D. Bader, PhD, associate professor at the University of Toronto (computational biology and cancer bioinformatics); </li><li>Amy A. Caudy, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Medical Genetics and Microbiology at the University of Toronto (metabolomics and 2-hydroxyglutarate biology);</li><li>Nada Jabado, MD, PhD, senior scientist/professor, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, McGill University&#160;(pediatric brain tumor genomics and epigenomics);</li><li>Mathieu Lupien, PhD, scientist at UHN (cancer genomics, epigenetics, and chromatin biology); </li><li>Marco A. Marra, PhD, director of the Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, in Vancouver (human and cancer genomics);&#160; </li><li>Trevor Pugh, PhD, scientist at UHN (clinical and cancer genomics);</li><li>Michael Salter, MD, PhD, director of The Hospital for Sick Children Research Institute (neurobiology and synaptic plasticity); and </li><li>Michael D. Tyers, PhD, professor at the University of Montreal (proteomics and systems biology).</li></ul><p>&#160;</p><p>Serving as advocate on the team is Wendy M. Durigon, of Guelph, Ontario, founder of Jessica’s Footprint Foundation, named in honor of her daughter Jessica, who died of brain cancer in 2003 when she was just a year old.</p><p>“Genome Canada is proud to participate in this new Dream Team that is tackling a very tough problem in cancer genomics,” said Marc LePage, president and chief executive officer of Genome Canada. “Canadian scientists lead the world in this complex field, and we are certain their expertise will lead to progress against brain cancer.” </p><p>“Targeting cancer stem cells is a key piece of the puzzle to improving outcomes for brain tumor patients,” said Dr. Stephen Robbins, scientific director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute for Cancer Research. “The Dream Team’s research will help us understand how the cancer progresses and how to stop it.”</p><p>“The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research is proud to support the clinical trial component of this exciting project, ensuring there is a clear path to the clinic for the team’s research discoveries and that patients will benefit from this work as soon as possible,” said Thomas J. Hudson, MD, president and scientific director of OICR. “These clinical trials will be conducted here in Ontario, which has a long and successful history in cancer research and in cancer clinical trials.”</p><p>The SU2C Canada Cancer Stem Cell Dream Team is the second Dream Team to be announced by SU2C Canada. The first was the SU2C Canada – Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation Breast Cancer Dream Team. SU2C Canada is a project of EIF Canada, a Canadian registered charity. </p><p>As the scientific partner to SU2C Canada, the AACR International – Canada, the Canadian arm of the world’s largest scientific organization devoted to cancer research, is responsible for administering the research agreement and providing oversight to ensure that progress is being made. </p></div>