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American Association for Cancer Research to Participate in Upcoming Twitter Chat on Proton Therapy3325569/19/2014 7:06:18 PM44http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx597False2014-09-19T13:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassE9082EC942154243A270AAABACD43D8A"><p>The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will partner with the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and TIME magazine for a Twitter chat titled “The Role of Proton Beam Therapy in Cancer Care,” Tuesday, Sept. 23, 1-2 p.m. ET. The chat will be moderated by TIME’s senior health reporter, Alice Park.</p><p>Dennis Hallahan, MD, a member of the AACR’s Radiation Oncology Task Force, will represent the AACR on this Twitter chat. He is chairman of the Radiation Oncology Department and the Elizabeth H. and James S. McDonnell III distinguished professor in medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and serves on the senior leadership committee of the Siteman Cancer Center.&#160;</p><p>Follow the conversation on Twitter and join us&#58; <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23protonbeam&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#ProtonBeam</a></p><p>Follow the AACR on Twitter&#58; <a href="http&#58;//www.twitter.com/aacr" target="_blank">@AACR</a></p><p>For more information, please contact Jeremy Moore at <a href="mailto&#58;jeremy.moore@aacr.org">jeremy.moore@aacr.org</a> or 215-446-7109, or Lauren Riley at <a href="mailto&#58;lauren.riley@aacr.org">lauren.riley@aacr.org</a> or 215-446-7155.</p></div>
Call for Ideas Open for the Stand Up To Cancer-American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Translational Research Dream Team Grant3272309/18/2014 2:20:40 PM71http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx595False2014-09-18T14:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassEAA231E9C6604D9A98C567093BBC662C"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is now accepting submissions of ideas for the Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C)-American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Translational Research Dream Team Grant that will offer up to $20 million in research funding, with the Society and SU2C each providing half the funds over a three-year period. Bristol-Myers Squibb will provide funding in the amount of $5 million to SU2C that will support this Dream Team.</p><p>The grant provides funding for research projects that must include therapeutic interventions for lung cancer and deliver near-term patient benefit through investigation by a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional Dream Team of experts. The research will be expected to involve new immunological approaches. Proposals for the grant must describe plans indicating how the group will use a transformative and synergistic approach, and how the work will be translated into the clinic. To maximize creativity, innovation, and collaboration, the projects should span multiple disciplines and use modern scientific tools to attack research questions in a coordinated effort. </p><p>A SU2C-American Cancer Society Joint Scientific Advisory Committee (JSAC) will conduct a unique, interactive, rapid, and rigorous evaluation of the applications via a multistep scientific review process. The JSAC is comprised of highly accomplished senior laboratory researchers and physician-scientists, as well as advocates. </p><p>The committee is chaired by Nobel Laureate Phillip A. Sharp, PhD, institute professor at the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Arnold J. Levine, PhD, professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick, and William H. Chambers, PhD, national vice president, extramural research, at the American Cancer Society will serve as vice-chairs.</p><p>Letters of Intent for the SU2C-American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Translational Research Dream Team Grant are due by noon ET, Nov. 5, 2014, via <a href="https&#58;//proposalcentral.altum.com/default.asp?GMID=39" target="_blank">proposalCENTRAL</a>.</p><p><a href="/funding/Pages/funding-listing.aspx#Default=%7b%22k%22%3a%22%22%2c%22r%22%3a%5b%7b%22n%22%3a%22RefinableString09%22%2c%22t%22%3a%5b%22%5c%22%C7%82%C7%82447265616d205465616d%5c%22%22%5d%2c%22o%22%3a%22AND%22%2c%22k%22%3afalse%2c%22m%22%3anull%7d%5d%7d">Learn more</a> about general information on eligibility criteria, the application process, and other details about Dream Team grants<a href="/su2cfunding/dreamteam.">.</a> </p><p>Inquiries may be directed to the AACR Scientific Review and Grants Administration Department at 267-765-1049 or <a href="mailto&#58;su2c@aacr.org">su2c@aacr.org</a>. </p><p>The SU2C-American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Translational Research Dream Team Grant recipients are scheduled to be announced in spring 2015. </p></div>
​Call for Ideas Now Open for the Ovarian Cancer Translational Research Dream Team Grant3272439/18/2014 2:24:50 PM63http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx596False2014-09-18T14:00:00ZA Collaboration of Stand Up To Cancer, Ovarian Cancer Research Fund, Ovarian Cancer National Alliance and National Ovarian Cancer Coalition<div class="ExternalClass4B37BD1B3C5049C8B049E6D2DDB36E34"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is now accepting submissions of ideas for the Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C)-Ovarian Cancer Research Fund (OCRF)-Ovarian Cancer National Alliance (OCNA)-National Ovarian Cancer Coalition (NOCC) Translational Research Dream Team Grant that will offer up to $6 million in research funding. </p><p>The SU2C-OCRF-OCNA-NOCC Translational Research Dream Team grant provides three years of funding for research projects that must include therapeutic interventions for ovarian cancer and deliver near-term patient benefit through investigation by a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional Dream Team of experts. Proposals for the grant must describe plans indicating how the group will use a transformative and synergistic approach, and how the work will be translated into the clinic. To maximize creativity, innovation, and collaboration, the projects should span multiple disciplines and use modern scientific tools to attack research questions in a coordinated effort. </p><p>A Joint Scientific Advisory Committee (JSAC) appointed by SU2C, OCRF, OCNA, and NOCC will conduct a unique, interactive, rapid, and rigorous evaluation of the applications via a multistep scientific review process. The JSAC is comprised of highly accomplished senior laboratory researchers and physician-scientists, as well as advocates. </p><p>The committee is chaired by Arnold J. Levine, PhD, professor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, and at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey in New Brunswick. William G. Nelson, MD, PhD, director of the Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center in Baltimore, and Jeff Boyd, PhD, senior vice president at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia and chair of OCRF’s Scientific Advisory Committee, will serve as vice-chairs.</p><p>Letters of Intent for SU2C-OCRF-OCNA-NOCC Translational Research Dream Team Grant are due by noon ET, Nov. 7, 2014, via <a href="https&#58;//proposalcentral.altum.com/default.asp?GMID=39" target="_blank">proposalCENTRAL.</a> </p><p><a href="/FUNDING/PAGES/FUNDING-LISTING.ASPX#Default=%7b%22k%22%3a%22%22%2c%22r%22%3a%5b%7b%22n%22%3a%22RefinableString09%22%2c%22t%22%3a%5b%22%5c%22%C7%82%C7%82447265616d205465616d%5c%22%22%5d%2c%22o%22%3a%22AND%22%2c%22k%22%3afalse%2c%22m%22%3anull%7d%5d%7d">Learn more</a> about general information on eligibility criteria, the application process, and other details about this Dream Team grant. Inquiries may be directed to the AACR Scientific Review and Grants Administration Department at 267-765-1049 or <a href="mailto&#58;su2c@aacr.org">su2c@aacr.org</a>. </p><p>The SU2C-OCRF-OCNA-NOCC Translational Research Dream Team Grant recipients are scheduled to be announced in spring 2015. </p></div>
American Association for Cancer Research Releases 2014 Cancer Progress Report: Research is Transforming Lives3178999/16/2014 2:16:03 PM86http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx593False2014-09-16T14:00:00ZNow is the time to invest in the NIH<div class="ExternalClassA5C35EE6D23B4C24A6D968569DA700AA"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Research continues to fuel significant advances against cancer. This progress has been spurred by federal investments in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Cancer Institute (NCI), according to the American Association for Cancer Research's (AACR) fourth annual Cancer Progress Report, released today.</p><p>Thanks to research, Americans today are more likely to survive a cancer diagnosis and enjoy a higher quality of life than at any other time in history.</p><p>&quot;While we are continuing to make impressive progress against cancer, the pace of that progress is being slowed due to years of declining budgets at the NIH and NCI,&quot; said <a href="http&#58;//www.vicc.org/dd/display.php?person=carlos.arteaga">Carlos L. Arteaga, MD</a>, president of the AACR and professor of medicine and cancer biology at <a href="http&#58;//www.vicc.org/">Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center</a>, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. &quot;If we are to fully realize the promise of science to transform cancer care, it will require leadership in Congress and within the administration to ensure that biomedical research in cancer becomes a major priority for our nation.&quot;</p><p>The <em><a href="http&#58;//cancerprogressreport.org/Pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014</a></em> is a comprehensive educational tool that chronicles the progress that has been made against cancer; details how federal investment in the NIH and NCI is transforming lives, such as the lives of the 12 individuals who shared their experiences with cancer in the report; and calls on the administration and Congress to prioritize the growth of the NIH and NCI budgets at a predictable, robust pace by providing annual budget increases at least comparable to the biomedical inflation rate.</p><p>According to the report&#58;</p><ul><li>There are estimated to be nearly 14.5 million cancer survivors alive today in the United States, and almost 380,000 of these individuals received their cancer diagnoses as children or adolescents.</li><li>Between Aug. 1, 2013, and July 31, 2014, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved six new anticancer therapeutics and new uses for five previously approved anticancer therapeutics.</li><li>During the same period, two imaging agents received new cancer-related FDA approvals, as did a previously approved screening test.</li><li>Research discoveries continue to advance precision medicine&#58; Five of the six new anticancer therapeutics are molecularly targeted agents.</li><li>Patients with some types of cancer have three or more molecularly targeted treatment options, should their cancer recur or become resistant to the primary therapy.</li><li>Cancer genomics research is the foundation for novel clinical trials designed to accelerate the pace at which new therapeutics are approved for patient care.</li><li>Cancer immunotherapeutics are continuing to yield remarkable, long-lasting patient responses in several types of cancer.</li></ul><p><strong><br>Cancer&#58; An Ongoing Challenge; Research&#58; A Vital Investment</strong><br>The report states that although extraordinary advances are being made against cancer, the disease remains a major health care challenge and a huge financial burden, both nationally and internationally.</p><p>Moreover, because most cancer diagnoses occur in those who are 65 years of age and older, a segment of the U.S. population that is expected to double by 2060, it is predicted that the number of cancer diagnoses will increase dramatically in the future.</p><p>The report emphasizes that the rising economic and personal burden of cancer underscores the urgent need for more research to develop new prevention and treatment approaches.</p><p>&quot;Research has transformed the lives of millions of individuals,&quot; said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. &quot;However, we need more progress because it is unacceptable that one American will die of cancer every minute of every day this year. Cancer survivors like the 12 courageous individuals who shared their stories in this report, as well as those who are projected to receive a cancer diagnosis in the future, are depending on our nation's policymakers to make funding for biomedical research a national priority.&quot;</p></div>
Identification of Novel Mutations Causing Lung Cancer Resistance Leads to New Treatment Strategies3193629/16/2014 8:13:55 PM116http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx594False2014-09-16T04:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassA9CA5A4EA7434C05985DCFB456E0C6A5"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Two mutations that cause lung cancer resistance to the investigational ALK inhibitor alectinib were identified, and this information may help design new treatment regimens for patients with ALK-positive lung cancer, according to a study published in <em><a href="http&#58;//clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/" target="_blank">Clinical Cancer Research</a></em>, a journal of the American <span><span>Association for Cancer Research. </span></span></p><p>In 2014, more than 159,000 men and women are expected to die of lung cancer in the United States. About 84 percent of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), and 3 to 5 percent of NSCLCs have mutations in the gene ALK.<br><br>“The goal of our study was to determine why ALK-positive lung cancers become resistant to alectinib, and we looked at this in two different ways,” said <a href="http&#58;//www.massgeneral.org/doctors/doctor.aspx?ID=17279" target="_blank" title="Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD">Alice T. Shaw, MD, PhD</a>, a thoracic oncologist at the <a href="http&#58;//www.massgeneral.org/cancer/" target="_blank">Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center</a>. “We studied a resistant cell line model that we generated in the lab, and we also studied a tumor sample from a patient with NSCLC who had been treated with alectinib and then became resistant.<br><br>“We discovered two novel mutations that have not been described before in patients with NSCLC, and these mutations conferred high-level resistance to alectinib,” Shaw added. “Another equally important finding from this study is that we were able find a way to overcome this type of resistance, in our laboratory experiments as well as in a patient, using another next-generation ALK inhibitor, ceritinib, previously known as LDK378.”<br><br>A drug that targets ALK, crizotinib, was approved in 2011 by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) but patients develop resistance to this drug within a year. As a result, next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as alectinib, are being developed. Alectinib was recently approved in Japan and has “breakthrough therapy” designation from the FDA. <br><br>“Our studies suggest that ceritinib may be effective against ALK-positive lung cancers that have become resistant to alectinib due to the mutations we have identified,” said Shaw. “There are eight next-generation ALK inhibitors that have entered the clinic and our results show that ALK-positive lung cancer patients may benefit from multiple, sequential ALK-inhibitor therapies depending on the underlying resistance mechanism.”<br><br>Using a computational model, Shaw and colleagues found that the two newly identified mutations decreased the binding affinity of alectinib to its target in the tumor, thereby enabling the tumor to become resistant to the drug. They conducted more laboratory experiments and identified two more-potent, next-generation ALK inhibitors, ceritinib and AP26113, to be effective in tumors that developed resistance to alectinib.<br><br>Shaw and colleagues treated a lung cancer patient who developed resistance to alectinib with ceritinib and this patient had a marked response to ceritinib, which lasted for seven months.<br><br>“These studies have been invaluable in learning how ALK-positive cancers become resistant to different ALK inhibitors and in identifying the best therapeutic strategies that will reinduce remissions,” said <a href="http&#58;//www.massgeneral.org/research/researchlab.aspx?id=1169">Jeffrey A. Engelman, MD, PhD</a>, director of the <a href="http&#58;//www.massgeneral.org/cancer/services/centers/thoracic.aspx">Center for Thoracic Cancers</a> at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, and a co-investigator of this study.<br><br>This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science KAKENHI grants. Shaw is a consultant for Pfizer, Novartis, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co., Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc., Ignyta Inc., Daiichi-Sankyo, and Genentech. Engelman is a consultant for Genentech, Chugai, and Novartis.<br></p></div>
Patients With Head and Neck Cancers Resistant to Cetuximab May Benefit From an Investigational Drug3159689/15/2014 8:53:28 PM94http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx591False2014-09-15T20:30:00Z<div class="ExternalClass3AEFC787744E4E78A6D8A2291695E9AB"><p>PHILADELPHIA —The investigational drug alpelisib, previously known as BYL719, was able to overcome head and neck cancer resistance to the anti-EGFR treatment cetuximab, and combining alpelisib with cetuximab was found to be beneficial, according to data from a phase Ib/II trial presented at the AACR special conference <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=5">Targeting the PI3K-mTOR Network in Cancer</a>, held Sept. 14-17. </p><p>“Most of head and neck cancers are driven by activation of the EGFR pathway. Cetuximab is a drug that targets EGFR and is effective in this setting, but cancers often become resistant to this therapy,” said <a href="http&#58;//cancer.ucsf.edu/people/profiles/munster_pamela.3449" target="_blank">Pamela Munster, MD</a>, professor of medicine and director of the Early Phase Clinical Trials Unit at the <a href="http&#58;//cancer.ucsf.edu/" target="_blank">UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center</a>. “Treatment resistance is often conveyed through activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, and alpelisib is an inhibitor of this pathway.” </p><p>“In this clinical trial, we treated patients with recurrent and metastatic head and neck cancer with a combination of cetuximab and alpelisib, and about 25 percent of the patients benefited from this therapy. Further, the treatment was fairly well tolerated,” said Munster. “We are very encouraged by the study findings, and we are now conducting the phase II part of the trial.”</p><p>In the phase Ib study, Munster and colleagues recruited 37 patients with recurrent/metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck resistant to platinum-based chemotherapy. Of these patients, 32 received 300 mg alpelisib once daily and five received 400 mg alpelisib once daily, plus cetuximab. </p><p>Of the 32 patients who received alpelisib alone, four patients had a confirmed partial response and 16 had stable disease, of which five had unconfirmed partial responses. </p><p>Among the 37 patients, the overall response rate was 11 percent and the disease control rate was 54 percent. Of the seven patients who had relapsed on prior cetuximab therapy, treatment with alpelisib resulted in one partial response and disease control in five, with a disease control rate of 71 percent.</p><p>To study the effect of a combination of alpelisib and cetuximab, the researchers conducted preclinical studies using mice bearing cetuximab-sensitive and cetuximab-resistant esophageal cancer cells and found that a combination of alpelisib and cetuximab had an additive effect in mice with cetuximab-sensitive cancer cells leading to tumor regression. In mice with cetuximab-resistant cancer cells, this combination restored sensitivity to cetuximab.</p><p>Based on the data from preclinical studies and phase Ib results testing the combination, the team is currently conducting the phase II part of the trial to test a combination of cetuximab and 300 mg alpelisib once daily in patients who have squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.</p><p>This study was funded by Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation. Munster declares no conflicts of interest.​</p></div>
American Association for Cancer Research CEO to Speak at Ovarian Cancer Symposium at MIT’s Koch Institute3162239/15/2014 10:01:57 PM92http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx592False2014-09-15T17:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassC09B5D015F444E77A8262E7B0B6CC07A"><p>PHILADELPHIA — Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will provide opening remarks and serve as a panelist during a special symposium, “Bridging the Gap in Ovarian Cancer,” hosted by the <a href="http&#58;//ki.mit.edu/" target="_blank">Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research</a> at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Tuesday, Sept. 16. </p><p>The symposium, to begin at 1 p.m. ET, is a free public event geared toward ovarian cancer patients, survivors, family members, advocates, researchers, and other interested members of the public. The Koch Institute organized the event to discuss advances in the science and technology to fight ovarian cancer and will highlight the power of bringing together bioengineering, advanced cancer science, and clinical oncology to solve the most challenging problems in ovarian cancer.</p><p>Foti will provide the opening remarks at 2 p.m. The symposium will provide a clinician’s perspective on challenges associated with ovarian cancer and presentations from MIT faculty on their research on novel approaches for the detection and treatment of ovarian cancer, as well as advocacy showcases, tours, a roundtable discussion, and reception. Presenters and panelists include scientists, survivors, and advocates. </p><p>Additionally, Foti will be one of three featured speakers at the evening program, “SOLUTIONS with/in/sight&#58; Women Converge on Cancer.” Foti will join two other women who are advocates for cancer research&#58; Susan Hockfield, PhD, MIT president emerita and Koch Institute faculty member, and Joyce Kulhawik, three-time cancer survivor and Emmy award-winning arts and entertainment critic. These evening talks begin at 7 p.m. </p><p>For more information or to register for the symposium and/or evening program, visit the Koch Institute’s <a href="http&#58;//ki.mit.edu/news/events/ocsept2014" target="_blank">website</a>.</p></div>
Olaparib Tablet Safe in Pretreated Ovarian Cancer Patients; More Effective in Those With BRCA Mutations2947529/10/2014 1:56:39 AM144http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx590False2014-09-09T23:05:00Z<div class="ExternalClass982442D89BF045EEAD5C38B49DD23A7C"><p>​SEATTLE — An oral tablet form of a PARP inhibitor, olaparib, given in combination with chemotherapy, was safe in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, and patients with BRCA mutations may have a better response compared with those without a BRCA mutation, according to phase Ib clinical trial data presented at the <a href="http&#58;//www.marsharivkin.org/draft/events/symposium/" target="_blank">Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research-AACR 10th Biennial Ovarian Cancer Research Symposium</a>, held Sept. 8-9.&#160;</p><p><img src="/PublishingImages/Rivkin_Saul_150x200.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px 20px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" />&quot;This study is one of the first studies to use olaparib tablets instead of olaparib capsules,&quot; said <a href="http&#58;//www.marsharivkin.org/about/advisory_rivkin.html" target="_blank">Saul Rivkin, MD</a>, founder and chairman of the <a href="http&#58;//www.marsharivkin.org/draft/about/contact.html" target="_blank">Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research</a>, and a research scientist at the <a href="http&#58;//www.swedish.org/services/cancer-institute" target="_blank">Swedish Cancer Institute</a>, both in Seattle, Washington. &quot;The goal was to find the maximum tolerated dose of olaparib tablets plus weekly metronomic carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with relapsed ovarian cancer.</p><p>&quot;This treatment regimen provided a response rate of 66 percent in heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients. It was surprisingly tolerable with no grade 4 toxicities,&quot; said Rivkin.</p><p>&quot;The outlook for ovarian cancer patients with advanced disease is not equivalent to that of breast cancer, and a lot of work needs to be done to improve the cure rate,&quot; Rivkin added. &quot;Medical researchers are discovering and investigating new and innovative therapies for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We are constantly working toward improving the quality of life and survival for all ovarian cancer patients.&quot;</p><p>Rivkin and colleagues enrolled 14 heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients (from three to eight prior therapies), ages 42 to 77. Patients received paclitaxel and carboplatin weekly, three weeks out of four, with increasing doses of olaparib. The maximum tolerated dose of olaparib was found to be 150 mg twice daily for three consecutive days of each week of each cycle.</p><p>Of the 12 evaluable patients, four had a complete response (33 percent), four had a partial response (33 percent), two had stable disease (16 percent), and two had disease progression (16 percent).&#160;</p><p>Three patients with a complete response, three with a partial response, one with stable disease, and one with disease progression had BRCA mutations detected in their tumors.</p><p>The most common grade 3 toxicities included neutropenia, leukopenia, lymphopenia, and anemia. There was no evidence of gastrointestinal, renal, cardiac, hepatic, pulmonary, or dermatologic toxicities in any of the patients with a toxicity grade greater than 2.</p><p>The investigators plan to recruit up to 40 additional patients in the phase II extension of this protocol.</p><p>This study was funded by the Dulien Fund and AstraZeneca. Rivkin declares no conflicts of interest.</p></div>
AACR Issues Policy Statement to Urge FDA to Provide Oversight of High Risk Laboratory Developed Tests to Protect Patient Safety and Product Innovation2913519/9/2014 12:31:17 PM134http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx589False2014-09-09T04:05:00ZAACR immediate past president to testify on Capitol Hill on the issue<div class="ExternalClassD12E6157C83F4890BA7821DDAE287A84"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) issued a <a href="http&#58;//clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2014/09/05/1078-0432.CCR-14-2295" target="_blank">policy statement</a> Tuesday, Sept. 9, that underscores the importance of safe, accurate, and effective diagnostic tests by recommending that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) begin to actively exert its authority to regulate high-risk laboratory developed tests (LDTs) that are being utilized by physicians to make treatment decisions, including the tailoring of an individual's cancer treatment regimen.</p><p><img src="/PublishingImages/Sawyers_Charles_150x200.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px 20px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" />&quot;FDA's policy of enforcement discretion over LDTs was acceptable when these tests were mostly routine laboratory procedures; however, as LDTs have evolved in complexity, the risk posed to patients has also increased,&quot; said Charles L. Sawyers, MD, immediate past president of the AACR, chair of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, and co-author of the policy statement. &quot;It is therefore vital that all diagnostic tests used to make high-risk treatment decisions be FDA-approved, so patients and physicians can be assured of the test's safety and accuracy,&quot; he said.</p><p>&quot;Diagnostic tests play a central role in the success of personalized medicine by helping oncologists identify the right treatment for the right patient,&quot; said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc) chief executive officer of the AACR. &quot;Therefore, we strongly support the FDA exerting its authority to regulate LDTs that pose a high risk to cancer patients.&quot;</p><p>The AACR believes that a robust, predictable, and reliable evidence-based regulatory framework will ensure that future treatments and cures will reach patients in an efficient and expeditious manner. Implementation of a risk-based framework by the FDA that would provide for evaluation of all high-risk molecular diagnostic tests would balance the need for encouraging innovative medical product development with the need for ensuring patient safety.</p><p>&quot;Having a single approval standard for all tests regardless of origin would also create a more predictable regulatory and investment climate for both the diagnostics and the pharmaceutical industries,&quot; said Laura van 't Veer, PhD, director of applied genomics at UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center and co-author of the policy statement.</p><p>&quot;As an oncologist, I rely on these complex diagnostic test results to make treatment decisions,&quot; said Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, AACR president and professor of medicine and cancer biology, and associate director for clinical research at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. &quot;I need to be confident in the test results that form the basis of high-risk treatment decisions for my patients, whether these tests are developed as LDTs or as kits approved by the FDA.&quot;</p></div>
Research Finds No Association Between Wearing a Bra and Breast Cancer2813409/5/2014 1:17:21 PM146http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx588False2014-09-05T04:05:00Z<div class="ExternalClass176857BAE2A94088804AE8F8467D235F"><p>PHILADELPHIA — A population-based case-control study found no association between bra wearing and increased breast cancer risk among postmenopausal women, according to research published in <em><a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/" target="_blank">Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</a></em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. <img src="/PublishingImages/Chen_Lu_150x200.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;10px;float&#58;right;vertical-align&#58;auto;" /></p><p>“There have been some concerns that one of the reasons why breast cancer may be more common in developed countries compared with developing countries is differences in bra-wearing patterns,” said Lu Chen, MPH, a researcher in the <a href="http&#58;//www.fhcrc.org/en/labs/phs.html" target="_blank">Public Health Sciences Division</a> at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Washington School of Public Health. “Given how common bra wearing is, we thought this was an important question to address.</p><p>“Our study found no evidence that wearing a bra increases a woman’s risk for breast cancer. The risk was similar no matter how many hours per day women wore a bra, whether they wore a bra with an underwire, or at what age they first began wearing a bra,” said Chen.</p><p>“There has been some suggestion in the lay media that bra wearing may be a risk factor for breast cancer. Some have hypothesized that drainage of waste products in and around the breast may be hampered by bra wearing. Given very limited biological evidence supporting such a link between bra wearing and breast cancer risk, our results were not surprising,” Chen added. </p><p>According to the study authors, this study characterizes various bra-wearing habits in relation to breast cancer risk using a rigorous epidemiological study design. “The findings provide reassurance to women that wearing a bra does not appear to increase the risk for the most common histological types of postmenopausal breast cancer,” the authors noted.</p><p>Study participants were 454 women with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and 590 women with invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), the two most common subtypes of breast cancer, from the Seattle-Puget Sound metropolitan area; 469 women who did not have breast cancer served as controls. All women were postmenopausal, ages 55 to 74.</p><p>The researchers conducted in-person interviews and obtained information on demographics, family history, and reproductive history. They also asked a series of structured questions to assess lifetime patterns of bra wearing. Questions included age at which the study participant started wearing a bra, whether she wore a bra with an underwire, her bra cup size and band size, the number of hours per day and number of days per week she wore a bra, and if her bra-wearing patterns ever changed at different times in her life.</p><p>No aspect of wearing a bra was associated with an increased risk for either IDC or ILC.</p><p>This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute. Chen declares no conflicts of interest.​</p></div>