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Dr. David Baltimore Honored With 2015 American Association for Cancer Research-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship10610744/17/2015 8:54:39 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx692False2015-04-17T20:50:00Z<div class="ExternalClass590D1086E2A74053B901E5FF3366A2A2"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will honor David Baltimore, PhD, president emeritus and Robert Andrews Millikan professor of biology at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, with the 11th annual AACR-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22.<br><br>Baltimore, who is a fellow of the AACR Academy, is being recognized for his work in immunology, virology, and cancer research. His pioneering research efforts have greatly contributed to the use of gene therapy methods to treat not only cancer, but other diseases such as AIDS, and his insights over the years have spurred innovative thinking on the part of scientists and physicians around the world. Baltimore received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1975 for his work on viral replication and his discovery of reverse transcriptase — the enzyme that generates DNA from RNA — which revolutionized molecular biology and has been essential to understanding the lifecycle of retroviruses such as HIV. <br><br>Baltimore will present his lecture, “MicroRNAs, Leukemia, and Hematopoietic Stem Cells Homeostasis,” Saturday, April 18, 5&#58;30 p.m. ET, in the Grand Ballroom of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br><br>The <a href="/Research/Awards/PAGES/DISTINGUISHED-LECTURERS-___8470D6.ASPX">AACR-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship</a> was established in 2004 to acknowledge an individual whose outstanding innovations in science and whose position as a thought leader have the potential to inspire creative thinking and new directions in cancer research. The recipient is selected by the AACR president and is not open to nominations.<br><br>“Dr. Baltimore is one of the world’s most influential molecular biologists,” said AACR President Carlos L. Arteaga, MD. “His groundbreaking discoveries have had a profound influence on cancer research. His discovery of reverse transcriptase enabled the development of molecular biology techniques that are used by cancer researchers on a daily basis. He played a leading role in establishing the field of recombinant DNA research, which has been pivotal for the study and understanding of cancer biology, and in advancing biotechnology and its many applications to human disease. The AACR is proud to honor his extraordinary accomplishments with the Weinstein Distinguished Lectureship.”<br><br>“Dr. Baltimore is an esteemed leader in the field of molecular biology,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “He has pioneered scientific breakthroughs that have had far-reaching impact across the spectrum of biomedical research, including cancer research. In addition to these stellar scientific contributions, which have earned him the Nobel Prize, Dr. Baltimore has been a longtime advocate for federal investment in biomedical research. He is greatly deserving of this award.”<br><br>“I am highly honored to be asked to deliver the AACR-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship,” Baltimore said. “Forty-five years ago, while I was immersed in studying viruses, I — as well as Howard Temin — discovered that cancer-inducing viruses use the unique strategy of copying their RNA genome in DNA, the stuff of heredity. I am proud to have played a part in beginning the conquest of this awful disease.”<br></p><p>Throughout his career, Baltimore has made landmark scientific discoveries in the field of molecular biology. His Nobel Prize-winning work on reverse transcriptase, which is essential for the reproduction of retroviruses such as HIV and the target of numerous antiretroviral drugs, was conducted early in his career. He went on to pioneer the use of recombinant DNA technology, which members of his laboratory used to advance understanding of the immune system, including discovering the transcription factor NF-κB and the recombination activating genes RAG-1 and RAG-2.<br><br>The research in his laboratory is currently focused on furthering knowledge of the development and function of the mammalian immune system and using viral vectors to carry new genes into immune cells to increase the range of pathogens effectively fought by the immune system and to make the immune system resist cancer growth more effectively.<br><br>Baltimore, who in 1996 was appointed head of the National Institutes of Health’s AIDS Vaccine Research Committee, has influenced U.S. public policies on such issues as AIDS and genetic engineering. He was an early advocate of federal AIDS research and co-chaired the National Academy of Sciences Committee on a National Strategy for AIDS in 1986. Baltimore currently co-directs the Joint Center for Translational Medicine, a joint effort between Caltech and the University of California, Los Angeles, which aims to facilitate the translation of basic science advances to the clinical arena. <br><br>Baltimore’s extensive collection of honors and accolades include the National Medal of Science, the AMA Scientific Achievement Award, and the Warren Alpert Foundation Scientific Prize from Harvard Medical School. He is also an elected member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences, as well as a foreign member of the Royal Society in the United Kingdom and the French Academy of Sciences.<br><br>Baltimore graduated with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, and received his doctorate from Rockefeller University in New York, where he also once served as president and professor of biology. He served on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for more than 30 years, including as founding director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Baltimore is a former president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.<br></p><p><a href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf" target="_blank">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.<br><br><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a target="_blank" href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd">#AACR15</a><br></p></div>
Penn’s Dr. Carl June Recognized With AACR-CRI Award in Cancer Immunology 10603504/17/2015 7:05:26 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx691False2015-04-17T18:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClassFA3B5320FD3F4C619DF5C865DBA4D569"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the <a href="http&#58;//cancerresearch.org/" target="_blank">Cancer Research Institute</a> (CRI) will recognize Carl H. June, MD, the Richard W. Vague professor in immunotherapy at the Perelman School of Medicine and director of the Center for Cellular Immunotherapies at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, with the third annual AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22.<br><br><a href="http&#58;//www.med.upenn.edu/apps/faculty/index.php/g275/p2328" target="_blank">June</a> is being recognized for his important contributions to cancer immunology, specifically his pioneering efforts related to the development of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. His work with CAR T-cell therapy has significantly enhanced the promise of cancer immunotherapy. For example, a CD19-targeted CAR T cell therapy developed by June and his team was recently licensed by Novartis, and the investigational therapy, now called CTL019, has received breakthrough therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsed and refractory adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This work will not only have a profound impact on the treatment of leukemia but is paving the way for the development of CAR T therapies for other types of cancer.<br><br>He will present his lecture, “CAR T cells&#58; Can We Move Beyond B cells?” Tuesday, April 21, 5&#58;30 p.m. ET, in the Grand Ballroom of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br><br>The <a href="/Research/Awards/PAGES/AACR-CRI-LLOYD-J-OLD-AWARD-IN-CANCER-IMMUNOLOGY-WINNERS.ASPX">AACR-CRI Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology</a> was established in 2013 in honor of the late Lloyd J. Old, MD, who is considered the “Father of Modern Tumor Immunology.” Old’s outstanding research in the field of cancer immunology, as well as his decades of leadership in fostering the field, had a widespread influence on cancer research. The award is intended to recognize an active cancer immunologist who, like Old, has done outstanding and innovative research in cancer immunology that has had a far-reaching impact on the field.<br><br>June, who is an active AACR member and a senior editor of Cancer Immunology Research, has been recognized with numerous honors throughout his career, including the Taubman Prize for Excellence in Translational Medical Science, the Karl Landsteiner Memorial Award from the American Association of Blood Banks, the Steinman Award for Human Immunology Research from the American Association of Immunologists, the Richard V. Smalley Award from the Society of Immunotherapy of Cancer, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize (shared with James Allison), the Legion of Merit from the U.S. Navy, and election to the Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.<br><br>Prior to joining the University of Pennsylvania in 1999, June had been a professor in the Department of Medicine at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland. <br><br>A graduate of the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, June served as a U.S. Navy Medical Officer from 1975 to 1996. He received his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and completed a research fellowship in immunology with the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland and a fellowship in oncology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. June performed his internship and residency at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda.<br><br><a href="/AM15-Press" target="_blank">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.<br><br><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#AACR15</a><br></p></div>
AACR CEO Margaret Foti to Receive Children’s Champion Award From The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia10602264/17/2015 6:44:48 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx690False2015-04-17T17:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass2AF3B1F231E749AABEC7972CBBA2F2D5"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer (CEO) of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), will be recognized with the Children’s Champion Award for her outstanding pediatric cancer advocacy efforts, at a town hall meeting of the AACR’s <a href="/Membership/Pages/Scientific%20Working%20Groups/pediatric-cancer-working-group.aspx">Pediatric Cancer Working Group,</a> in Philadelphia, Sunday, April 19, during the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015.</a><br><br>“The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia is proud to honor Margaret Foti with the Children’s Champion Award,” said Steven M. Altschuler, MD, CEO of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). “We applaud Dr. Foti’s leadership in advocating on behalf of children with cancer to strengthen both research and advocacy efforts. Her commitment mirrors our mission to enhance the health and well-being of children in the United States and around the world. We are tremendously grateful for this partnership.”<br><br>The Children’s Champion Award was established in 2007 by <a href="http&#58;//www.chop.edu/" target="_blank">The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia</a> to honor individuals and/or organizations that improve the lives of children through public health policy, education, and advocacy. Past recipients include Sen. Robert Casey, Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, Rep. Charlie Dent, Rep. Chaka Fattah, Rep. Joe Pitts, Rep. Pat Meehan, Mayor Michael Nutter, and Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick.<br><br>“On behalf of clinicians and scientists across the world who are working to advance research and treatment for children with cancer, I am delighted to present Margaret Foti with The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Children’s Champion Award,” said Garrett Brodeur, MD, oncologist at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and 2015-2016 chairperson of the AACR Pediatric Cancer Working Group Steering Committee. “Dr. Foti has been a staunch advocate for pediatric cancer for decades, increasing its visibility and underscoring how the significance of research findings in pediatrics can impact the understanding of adult cancers.”<br><br>“I am deeply honored and humbled to receive the Children’s Champion Award,” said Foti. “Our children are our future, and I have both a personal and professional commitment to their well-being and survival from the devastating collection of diseases we call childhood cancer. I am immensely proud of receiving this award from one of the greatest children’s cancer institutions in the country. The AACR is dedicated to advancing pediatric cancer research, but cancer is the leading cause of disease-related death among children in the United States, and this sobering statistic reminds all of us that we urgently need to do more. We will continue to work hard to foster the research advances that will lead to more cures for children affected by cancer.”<br><br>During Foti’s tenure as CEO of the AACR, membership has grown from about 3,000 to 35,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and cancer advocates residing in 101 countries. Of these 35,000 members, nearly 2,000 comprise the membership of the AACR Pediatric Cancer Working Group. In addition, the organization’s scientific meetings, peer-reviewed journals, and science policy work have flourished, furthering progress against all cancers through research, education, communication, and collaboration.<br><br>Through her visionary leadership, the AACR established the Pediatric Cancer Working Group in 2011 to ensure that childhood cancer research is a global priority supported by improved federal and philanthropic funding, the latest technologies, and the most effective educational strategies. Along with steady increases in membership, the working group has been essential to the establishment of new AACR funding opportunities and to special conferences focused on pediatric cancer. The second of these conferences is scheduled to be held Nov. 9–12, 2015, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.<br><br>Foti also leads the AACR’s Scientific Partnership with Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C), a charitable initiative that supports groundbreaking research aimed at getting new cancer treatments to patients in an accelerated time frame, including to patients with pediatric cancer through the <a href="/Funding/Pages/sutc-dream-team.aspx?ItemID=5">SU2C-St. Baldrick’s Dream Team</a>, which is working on a project titled “Immunogenomics to Create New Therapies for High-risk Childhood Cancers.” The AACR plays an integral role by providing expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of individual and team science grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit.<br><br>Under Foti’s guidance, the AACR has become an outspoken proponent of policies that support adult and pediatric cancers. The organization engages with policymakers through its Science Policy and Government Affairs Committee and Washington, D.C., office, which opened in 2007 to amplify the voice of cancer researchers, patients, survivors, and caregivers on Capitol Hill. The AACR’s commitment to advocacy is evident through the leading role it plays in organizing the annual Rally for Medical Research Hill Day, which raises awareness among the nation’s policymakers about the need to make funding for the National Institutes of Health a national priority and the importance of continued investment in medical research.<br><br>Foti’s contributions have been widely recognized by numerous awards from organizations around the world. Her extensive list of formal recognitions includes honorary degrees in medicine and surgery from the University of Rome La Sapienza and the University of Catania in Sicily, and an honorary degree in medicine from the University CEU of San Pablo in Madrid. Most recently, she received the 2014 Ellen V. Sigal Advocacy Leadership Award from Friends of Cancer Research, the 2014 Morton M. Kligerman Visiting Professorship Award from the University of Pennsylvania, the 2013 Stanley P. Reimann Honor Award from Fox Chase Cancer Center, and the 2013 Distinguished Partner in Hope Award during the Annual Colorectal Cancer Conference hosted by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.<br><br>Foti will receive her award during the Pediatric Cancer Working Group’s town hall meeting, which is being held in Philadelphia in the Regency Ballroom C at the Loews Philadelphia Hotel, 6&#58;30 p.m., Sunday, April 19.<br></p></div>
AACR Recognizes Research Team That Developed Treatment for Late-stage Prostate Cancer10557274/17/2015 2:03:34 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx689False2015-04-17T14:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass3CD30B43998F44CF99646DA61968E96D"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) will award the ninth annual AACR Team Science Award to the Designing Androgen Receptor (AR) Inhibitors Team from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. <br><br>The <a href="/Research/Awards/PAGES/TEAM-SCIENCE-AWARD-___8470D6.ASPX">AACR Team Science Award</a> recognizes an outstanding interdisciplinary research team for its innovative and meritorious scientific work that has advanced or will likely advance cancer research, detection, diagnosis, prevention, or treatment. The team will be presented with the award during the opening ceremony, Sunday, April 19, 8&#58;15 a.m. ET, in Hall A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br><br>The Designing AR Inhibitors Team is a multi-institutional team that is composed of <a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//www.mskcc.org/research/lab/charles-sawyers">Charles Sawyers, MD, PhD,</a> team leader, director of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, AACR past-president, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator; <a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/doctor/howard-scher">Howard Scher, MD,</a> chief of genitourinary oncology service and D. Wayne Calloway chair in urologic oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering; and <a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//www.chem.ucla.edu/dept/Organic/Jung_Brochure.html">Michael Jung, PhD,</a> distinguished professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the UCLA.<br><br>The team is being honored for their collective work in discovering and developing the novel antiandrogen enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. After determining that AR overexpression was responsible for fueling the growth and survival of castration-resistant prostate cancers, the team used preclinical models to identify novel AR inhibitors that blocked the growth of tumors. These studies led to the clinical development of enzalutamide, which received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval in August 2012, after a phase III trial showed that the drug significantly extended survival among patients with metastatic, chemotherapy-resistant, castration-resistant prostate cancer. <br><br>“Fostering research collaborations has been central to the AACR’s mission to prevent and cure cancer since its inception in 1907,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “The progress against prostate cancer achieved as a result of the dedicated efforts of the ‘Designing Androgen Receptor Inhibitors Team’ is a stellar example of how team science can hasten the pace at which research progress can be achieved and translated into clinical improvements that yield meaningful advances for patients with cancer, and we are delighted to recognize the team’s accomplishments.”<br><br>“When we started this collaboration 10 years ago, Dr. Jung, Dr. Scher, and I were determined to make a difference for men with prostate cancer. We knew we had a good plan but we could never have imagined the impact that our work would eventually have. Nothing is more gratifying than seeing that vision become a reality and knowing that men with metastatic prostate cancer are now living longer. In addition to the three of us, our team includes the many trainees from our groups who made critical contributions to the work and the brave patients who participated in the first clinical trials of this experiment. We thank the AACR and Eli Lilly for recognizing the value of team science and the selection committee for honoring us with this very special award,” Sawyers said.<br>&#160;<br>The AACR Team Science Award, generously supported by grants from Eli Lilly and Company, is presented with the intent to stimulate change within the traditional cancer research culture by recognizing those individuals and institutions that value and foster interdisciplinary team science. The winning team collectively receives a $50,000 prize and is recognized for its scientific accomplishments and leadership role in fostering team science to advance cancer research.<br><br><a target="_blank" href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.<br><br><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a target="_blank" href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd">#AACR15</a></p></div>
Dr. Mario Capecchi Recognized With AACR Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research Award10557264/17/2015 1:18:13 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx688False2015-04-17T13:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass36E9B589ADA54990BAB60165469DD11D"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Mario R. Capecchi, PhD, will be honored for his tremendous scientific contributions, which have had a profound impact on the understanding of cancer, including his groundbreaking work in the development of gene targeting technology, with the 12th annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. <br><br><a target="_blank" href="http&#58;//capecchi.genetics.utah.edu/capecchi.html">Capecchi </a>is the distinguished professor of biology and human genetics at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City, an investigator with Huntsman Cancer Institute, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, and a fellow of the AACR Academy. His pioneering work in the development of gene targeting technology in the mouse has led to a revolution in our ability to study the function of cancer genes, as well as the mechanisms of cancer development. <br><br>The AACR established the <a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/Awards-Detail.aspx?ItemId=12">Award for Lifetime Achievement in Cancer Research</a> in 2004 to honor an individual who has made significant contributions to cancer research, either through a single scientific discovery or a body of work. These contributions, whether they have been in research, leadership, or mentorship, must have had a lasting impact on the cancer field and must have demonstrated a lifetime commitment to progress against cancer. <br><br>Capecchi will be presented with the award during the opening ceremony, Sunday, April 19, 8&#58;15 a.m. ET, in Hall A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br><br>A leader in the field of molecular genetics, Capecchi is best known for his pivotal role in the creation of gene-targeting technology, sometimes referred to as knockout technology. By manipulating specific genes within mouse-derived embryonic stem cells, he discovered how to genetically engineer a mouse devoid of a specific gene. This technology has spurred studies whereby researchers can analyze the specific function of a particular gene by investigating the biological repercussions of its absence. It has also proven to be a vital asset in the analysis of genetic mutations common in cancer patients. His work in this area was recognized in 2007 with the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.<br><br>Capecchi has also been involved in pioneering studies involving the Hox gene family. His studies of these genes have offered unique insights into the genetics of development within various organ systems, primarily the brain. Collectively, Capecchi’s findings have contributed immeasurably to the evolution of both molecular biology and genetics-based cancer research and have laid the groundwork for subsequent breakthroughs in cancer detection and treatment.<br></p><p>“Dr. Capecchi is a world-renowned scientist and Nobel laureate, and we are delighted to recognize his remarkable contributions to biomedical research and the field of cancer research through this award,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “His groundbreaking studies on gene targeting in mice changed the way that investigators across the spectrum of biomedical research worked, allowing them to examine for the first time the role of specific genes in development, physiology, and pathology. Gene targeting has been used in the study of numerous diseases, including cancer, and will be central to many future lifesaving advances.” <br><br>“It is a great honor to be recognized by the AACR for lifetime achievements in cancer research, an institution that has done so much to advance cancer research. I look forward to participating in the 2015 Annual AACR Meeting in Philadelphia. This meeting is always a highlight for cancer researchers throughout the world and I am sure this year’s meeting will be no exception,” Capecchi said.<br><br>Capecchi has been recognized with numerous other awards, including the Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research, the Wolf Prize in Medicine, the National Medal of Science, the Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Science, the Kyoto Prize in Basic Sciences, the Baxter Award for Distinguished Research in the Biomedical Sciences from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Alfred P. Sloan Jr. Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation, the Gairdner Foundation International Award, and the March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. He is also an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.<br><br>A native of Verona, Italy, Capecchi graduated from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and received his doctorate from Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He has been at the University of Utah since 1973, beginning his tenure as a professor of biology. <br><br><a target="_blank" href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.<br><br><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a target="_blank" href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd">#AACR15</a><br></p></div>
Dr. Donald Coffey Honored With AACR’s Margaret Foti Award for Leadership and Extraordinary Achievements in Cancer Research10540164/16/2015 4:42:02 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx687False2015-04-16T18:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass1DDABAF358DA401F9E1A1132EA2CDA8F"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — Donald S. Coffey, PhD, will be honored with the ninth annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Margaret Foti Award for Leadership and Extraordinary Achievements in Cancer Research at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. He will receive the award during the opening ceremony, Sunday, April 19, 8&#58;15 a.m. ET, in Hall A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br><br><a href="http&#58;//www.hopkinsmedicine.org/pharmacology_molecular_sciences/faculty/bios/coffey.html" target="_blank">Coffey</a>, a fellow of the AACR Academy, and the Catherine Iola and J. Smith Michael distinguished professor of urology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, is being honored for his tremendous leadership and profound contributions to cancer research. His distinct reputation as a natural advocate and leader is evidenced by his extraordinary tenure as AACR president (1997-1998), which resulted in a number of new exciting initiatives for the organization. Likewise, his pioneering work on the structure of the cell nuclei and the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, coupled with his dedication to mentoring young cancer researchers and promoting cancer research nationally, epitomizes the spirit of this award. <br><br>“Dr. Coffey is an internationally recognized research scientist who has made seminal contributions to numerous areas of cancer research,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “His work on the nuclear matrix established a new paradigm for understanding the biology of normal and cancer cells, while his prostate cancer research helped change the face of that deadly disease. However, Dr. Coffey’s impact on cancer research extends far beyond his scientific achievements. His outstanding leadership skills, dedication to mentoring young investigators, passionate advocacy for sustained increases in funding for cancer research, and remarkable ability to translate complex scientific concepts into lay language make him an icon in the field and a true champion of cancer research. He is greatly deserving of this award.”<br><br><a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/margaret-foti-award___8470D6.aspx">The Margaret Foti Award for Leadership and Extraordinary Achievements in Cancer Research</a>, established in 2007, recognizes an individual whose leadership and extraordinary achievements in cancer research, or in support of cancer research, have made a major impact on the field.<br><br>“To receive this premier award honoring Dr. Margaret Foti, who has built the American Association for Cancer Research into the world’s leading organization to impact the control of cancer, fulfills my lifetime dream. Sixty years ago, my wife Eula and I accepted our joint calling to serve this mission. Johns Hopkins University, the AACR, and hundreds of colleagues, supported by private and public donors, have all made this possible. We thank all of you,” said Coffey.<br></p><p>Coffey has made many important discoveries about abnormal and normal cell behavior and has launched major new research avenues in cell biology; he is widely known for his discovery of the nuclear matrix and the fact that DNA synthesis occurs on this matrix. He characterized the first Dunning animal models, which are used to isolate tumor metastasis genes and design chemotherapy regimens in prostate cancer. Coffey was the first to establish methods to identify androgen-insensitive prostate tumors and to elucidate the mechanisms of clonal selection in this insensitivity. He has also done groundbreaking work on telomerase in prostate cancer and contributed to the first prostate cancer gene therapy trial ever conducted.<br></p><p>Coffey’s outstanding service to the AACR began in 1976. In addition to his tenure as president from 1997 to 1998, he has been a member of the AACR board of directors (1993-1996) and Nominating Committee (2001-2003), co-chair of the Science Education Committee, program chair of the AACR Annual Meeting 1995, and a member of the Public Education Committee and Long-range Planning Committee, as well as associate editor of Cancer Research. He has also provided his mentorship in the Scientist↔Survivor Program and for early-career scientists. <br><br>Coffey has served in various other leadership positions throughout his career, including the National Cancer Advisory Board, the board of directors of the National Coalition for Cancer Research, president of the Society for Basic Urological Research, national chair of the National Cancer Institute’s National Prostatic Cancer Program, and director of the Brady Laboratory for Reproductive Biology and the research laboratories in the Department of Urology at Johns Hopkins.<br><br>Coffey has been recognized with numerous other honors, including the St. Paul’s Medal from the British Association of Urological Surgeons, the Achievement Award from the American Urological Association, the First Yamanouchi Award from the Society of International Urology, the Eugene Fuller Prostate Award from the American Urological Society, and the Falk Award from the National Institute of Environmental Science.<br></p><p>While working toward his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from East Tennessee State University, which he received in 1957, Coffey was a chemist at the North American Rayon Corporation. Upon graduating, Coffey spent two years as a chemical engineer at the Westinghouse Corporation in Baltimore. He began his tenure at Johns Hopkins in 1959, where he has served since, joining the Johns Hopkins Hospital as acting director of the Brady Urological Research Laboratory. He also received his doctorate from the university’s medical school in 1964. Additionally, he is currently an adjunct professor of medicine at Howard University in Washington, D.C.<br></p><p><a href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf.">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers. <br><br><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd">#AACR15</a><br></p></div>
Renowned Cancer Immunologist Dr. James Allison Recognized With Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research International Award10531904/16/2015 4:04:21 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx685False2015-04-16T16:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass6B2E3392EC78458DBE3DA5AD5D9F896D"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The 2015 Pezcoller Foundation-American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) International Award for Cancer Research will be presented to James P. Allison, PhD, at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. <br></p><p>Allison is being acknowledged for his groundbreaking discovery that blocking cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) signaling improves antitumor immune responses, as well as for his role in the development of the CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy), which was the first of a new class of cancer immunotherapeutics called immune checkpoint inhibitors. Ipilimumab, which was approved as a treatment for metastatic melanoma by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2011, was the first therapeutic to improve survival rates among patients with this deadly form of cancer.<br></p><p> <a href="http&#58;//faculty.mdanderson.org/James_Allison/Default.asp?SNID=1027120750" target="_blank">Allison</a> is chair of the Department of Immunology, executive director of the Immunology Platform, associate director of the Center for Cancer Immunology Research, deputy director of the David H. Koch Center for Applied Research in Genitourinary Cancer, and the Lilian H. Smith distinguished chair of immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is a fellow of the AACR Academy and a member of the AACR board of directors. He is also deputy editor of Cancer Immunology Research and scientific editor of Cancer Discovery. <br></p><p>The <a href="/Research/Awards/PAGES/PEZCOLLER-FOUNDATION-AACR-AWARD___8470D6.ASPX">Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award</a>, now in its 18th year, recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research. Allison will give his lecture, “Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Therapy&#58; New Insights, Opportunities and Prospects for a Cure,” Sunday, April 19, 4&#58;30 p.m. ET, in Hall A of the Pennsylvania Convention Center.<br></p><p>Allison’s research into the molecular mechanisms of activation of the T-cell receptor and the downstream signal transduction events that affect immune function led to his finding that CTLA-4, an immune system inhibitory checkpoint molecule expressed by T cells. His lab then developed an antibody against CTLA-4, which they went on to show inhibited tumor growth in mice. This basic research discovery led to the development of ipilimumab. By specifically blocking the inhibitor function of CTLA-4, ipilimumab allows T cells to attack and eliminate cancer cells. Allison called this mechanism of action “immune checkpoint blockade,” and believes that by combining targeted therapies with immunotherapeutics that mediate checkpoint blockade, one can turn cancer’s genomic instability, which it uses to build resistance to drugs, against it. <br></p><p>Allison is currently investigating additional mechanisms involved in T-cell activation and signaling pathways.<br></p><p>“Dr. Allison is a world-renowned immunologist, and we are delighted to recognize his extraordinary scientific accomplishments and leadership in the field of cancer immunotherapy,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD, (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “His dedicated efforts established the paradigm of immune checkpoint inhibitors, which is transforming the lives of many patients with melanoma and offering hope for patients with other forms of cancer. Dr. Allison’s work epitomizes how basic laboratory research can be translated to a lifesaving cancer treatment, and he is greatly deserving of this accolade.” <br></p><p>“I am deeply honored and humbled to receive the Pezcoller Award,” said Allison. “This award by the AACR recognizes the efforts of my research team over the years to develop strategies to unleash the immune system to treat cancer, as well as the many other investigators, clinicians, and patients whose efforts and courage made immunotherapy of cancer a reality that is benefiting cancer patients.”<br></p><p>Allison’s many other recent accolades include the inaugural AACR-Cancer Research Institute Lloyd J. Old Award in Cancer Immunology, the AACR-G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award, the Canada Gairdner Foundation award, the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, the Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research from the National Foundation for Cancer Research, the first Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science, the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Association of Immunologists, the Centeon Award for Innovative Breakthroughs in Immunology, and the William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Basic and Tumor Biology from the Cancer Research Institute. He has been elected to numerous societies, including the National Academy of Sciences, and is a fellow of the Institute of Medicine, the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, and the American Academy of Microbiology.<br></p><p>In addition Allison is leader of the Stand Up To Cancer-Cancer Research Institute Dream Team&#58; Immunologic Checkpoint Blockade and Adoptive Cell Transfer in Cancer Therapy. He served as chair of the immunology program at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York before joining MD Anderson Cancer Center in 2012. <br></p><p> <a href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf" target="_blank">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.<br></p><p><img src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" alt="" style="margin&#58;5px;" />Follow the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 on Twitter&#58; <a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#AACR15</a><br></p></div>
Research Grants Awarded to Projects Targeting Pancreatic Cancer, One of the Nation’s Deadliest Cancers10535204/16/2015 4:03:18 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx686False2015-04-16T15:30:00Z<div class="ExternalClassB25B9E4F10AF4B7A99DBCC7A33413320"><p>​PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the <a href="https&#58;//www.pancan.org/?utm_campaign=Grants-announcement/&amp;utm_medium=press-release&amp;utm_source=media" target="_blank">Pancreatic Cancer Action Network</a> will award 10 grants through their joint 2015 Research Grants Program to outstanding scientists throughout the country, supporting their novel research in the field of pancreatic cancer. <br><br>Since 2003, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, in collaboration with the AACR, has awarded&#160; 109 research grants totaling more than $27 million awarded to bright and motivated scientists across the country.<br><br>Pancreatic cancer has historically been understudied and underfunded, yet it is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and has the lowest survival rate of major cancers, at just 7 percent. <br><br>The diverse research topics funded this year include immunotherapy, targeting KRAS, heredity in pancreatic cancer, and tumor metabolism. <br><br>The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Grantees will be honored at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, held April 18-22. <br><br>“Pancreatic cancer is one of the few cancer types for which death rates are steadily increasing; it is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States by 2030,” said Margaret Foti, PhD, MD (hc), chief executive officer of the AACR. “Research into this deadly disease is urgently needed, and the AACR is proud to continue its partnership with the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network to support these grant opportunities which provide investigators with much-needed resources to support their innovative basic, translational, and clinical research into pancreatic cancer and the translation of these findings into improved outcomes for patients.”<br><br>“The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s research investment represents a focused effort at providing financial support for projects with potential to enhance our ability to treat or diagnose this disease. Certain grants within our portfolio are also intended to attract and retain early-career investigators into the field,” said Julie Fleshman, president and CEO of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. “The most promising science has been selected for funding through a rigorous peer-review process and we are thrilled to grow our ‘Community for Progress’ to tackle one of the nation’s deadliest cancers. By recruiting the brightest scientists with the most novel ideas, we continue to build a broad research community, poised to make significant scientific and clinical discoveries.”<br><br><a href="https&#58;//www.pancan.org/research-grants-program/grants-awarded/by-year/2015-pancreatic-cancer-action-network-research-grants/?utm_campaign=Grants-announcement/meet-the-grantees&amp;utm_medium=press-release&amp;utm_source=media" target="_blank">Meet the grant recipients</a> and learn more about their funded projects. &#160;<br><br><strong>The 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Research Acceleration Network Grants</strong> are three-year grants totaling $1 million each. These grants offer strategic funding and project management services to high-priority projects that have a clinical component and are already underway within the pancreatic cancer research community. This year’s recipients are&#58;<br><br></p><ul><li><strong>Jonathan R. Brody, PhD,</strong> Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, and co-PIs <strong>Christopher Albanese, PhD,</strong> Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, D.C., <strong>Subha Madhavan, PhD,</strong> Georgetown University, <strong>Emanuel F. Petricoin, III, PhD,</strong> George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, and <strong>Michael J. Pishvaian, MD, PhD,</strong> Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center</li></ul><blockquote><p>“Developing an algorithm for molecular tailored therapy”</p></blockquote><p></p><ul><li><strong>Channing J. Der, PhD,</strong> University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, and co-PIs <strong>Jason B. Fleming, MD, FACS,</strong> The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston and <strong>Krister Wennerberg, PhD,</strong> University of Helsinki, Finland</li></ul><p></p><blockquote><p>“Defining novel combination KRAS-targeted therapeutic strategies”</p></blockquote><p></p><ul><li><strong>Steven D. Leach, MD,</strong> Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York and co-PI <strong>Douglas T. Fearon, MD,</strong> Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York</li></ul><p></p><blockquote><p>“Eliminating T cell barriers in pancreatic cancer patients”<br>Supported by Celgene Corporation<br><br></p></blockquote><p><strong>The 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Career Development Awards</strong> are two-year grants of $200,000 that are designed to attract and support early-career scientists as they conduct pancreatic cancer research and establish successful career paths in the field. This year’s recipients are&#58;</p><p></p><ul><li><strong>Gregory L. Beatty, MD, PhD,</strong> University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia</li></ul><p></p><blockquote><p>“Immune escape mechanisms in metastatic pancreatic cancer&quot;<br>Supported by an anonymous foundation<br></p></blockquote><ul><li><strong>Cosimo Commisso, PhD,</strong> Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, La Jolla <br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Targeting macropinocytosis via Na+/H+ exchanger inhibition in PDAC”<br>Supported in honor of the legacy of Skip Viragh<br></p></blockquote><ul><li>Nada Y. Kalaany, PhD, Children’s Hospital Boston <br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Role of arginine metabolism in obesity-associated pancreatic cancer”<br>Supported by an anonymous foundation<br><br></p></blockquote><p><strong>The 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Pathway to Leadership Grant</strong> is a five-year grant totaling $600,000. This grant is designed to support the future leadership of pancreatic cancer research by funding an outstanding early-career investigator in a postdoctoral, mentored research position and continuing through a successful transition to independence. This year’s recipient is&#58;<br></p><ul><li><strong>Nicholas J. Roberts, VetMB, PhD,</strong> Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore<br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Integrative analyses of familial pancreatic cancer genomes”<br><br></p></blockquote><p><strong>The 2015 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network Translational Research Grants</strong> are two-year grants of $300,000 that support independent investigators conducting translational research that has as its endpoint the development of a pancreatic cancer assessment, prevention or treatment modality. This year’s recipients are&#58;<br></p><blockquote></blockquote><ul><li><strong>David Boothman, PhD,</strong> and co-PI <strong>Muhammad Beg, MD,</strong> UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas<br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Use of PARP1 inhibitors to leverage a tumor-selective ‘kiss of death’”<br></p></blockquote><ul><li><strong>Matthias Gromeier, MD,</strong> and co-PI <strong>James Abbruzzese, MD,</strong> Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina<br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Oncolytic poliovirus immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer”<br></p></blockquote><ul><li><strong>Kazuki N. Sugahara, MD, PhD,</strong> Columbia University, New York and co-PI <strong>Andrew M. Lowy, MD, FACS,</strong> University of California, San Diego, La Jolla<br></li></ul><blockquote><p>“Clinical development of a tumor-penetrating peptide for enhanced pancreatic cancer therapy”<br></p></blockquote><p>In addition to funding critical research and building professional development for grantees and collaboration among pancreatic cancer researchers, the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is growing its <a href="https&#58;//www.pancan.org/section-facing-pancreatic-cancer/oneonone-support/?utm_campaign=Grants-announcement/patient-services&amp;utm_medium=press-release&amp;utm_source=media" target="_blank">patient services</a> through a number of initiatives to support the organization’s goal to double survival by 2020. </p></div>
Dr. Owen Witte Recognized With AACR G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award10193304/7/2015 4:34:00 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx684False2015-04-07T16:00:00Z<div class="ExternalClass09F840E85AFF4EAEB85B1665F109B12F"><p>PHILADELPHIA — The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is honoring Owen N. Witte, MD, founding director of the Eli &amp; Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine &amp; Stem Cell Research and distinguished professor of microbiology, immunology, and molecular genetics at the University of California, Los Angeles, with the 55th annual AACR G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award at the <a href="/Meetings/Pages/MeetingDetail.aspx?EventItemID=25">AACR Annual Meeting 2015</a>, to be held in Philadelphia, April 18-22. <img alt="Owen N. Witte, MD" src="/PublishingImages/Witte_Owen_150x200.jpg" style="margin&#58;10px;vertical-align&#58;auto;float&#58;right;" /></p><p><a href="http&#58;//www.cancer.ucla.edu/index.aspx?page=645&amp;recordid=277" target="_blank">Witte</a>, who is also a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and an elected fellow of the AACR Academy, is being recognized for his many contributions to the understanding of human leukemias, immune disorders, and epithelial cancer stem cells. Witte’s work, which contributed to the development of several approved targeted therapies, has transformed the lives of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias and B-cell malignancies. He will present his lecture, “Finding Therapeutic Targets for Aggressive Prostate Cancer,” Monday, April 20, 5&#58;30 p.m. ET, in the Grand Ballroom of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. </p><p>The AACR and Eli Lilly and Company established the <a href="/Research/Awards/Pages/clowes-memorial-award___8470D6.aspx">G.H.A. Clowes Memorial Award</a> in 1961 to honor Dr. G.H.A. Clowes, a founding member of the AACR and research director at Eli Lilly. This award recognizes an individual with outstanding recent accomplishments in basic cancer research.</p><p>Witte’s innovative work helped revolutionize modern cancer treatment by defining tyrosine kinases as crucial drug targets in human disease. Most notably, he pinpointed the molecular consequences of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome abnormality present in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and related types of leukemia and defined the tyrosine kinase activity of the ABL gene product. These findings played a crucial role in the subsequent development of ABL kinase-targeted therapies, including imatinib (Gleevec), which remains the front-line treatment for Ph-positive CML.</p><p>In addition to his research involving ABL, Witte also co-discovered Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK). This particular kinase is essential for B-cell maturation and when mutated, results in the onset of the immunodeficiency disease, X-linked agammagloblulinemia. Recent studies involving this protein have resulted in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of ibrutinib (Imbruvica), a selective BTK inhibitor, for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. </p><p>More recently, Witte’s work has focused on defining the epithelial stem cell populations that contribute to prostate cancer. He is currently using mass spectrometry approaches to identify kinases that could be potential therapeutic targets for human prostate cancer.</p><p>“Much progress has been made in the area of personalized cancer medicine due to the dedication of scientists and physicians around the world, many of whom I’ve had the pleasure of working with through the AACR’s innovative initiatives,” said Witte. “But much more work is needed as we seek to understand cancer, which is not a single disease but rather many diseases that develop differently. I thank the AACR for their leadership in this effort and am honored to receive the Clowes Memorial Award.” </p><p>An active AACR member, Witte has served on the AACR board of directors and several grant review committees. He is a past recipient of the AACR-Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Award and a co-leader of the Stand Up to Cancer Dream Team&#58; Targeting Adaptive Pathways in Metastatic Treatment-Resistant Prostate Cancer. Additionally, he is also serving an appointed term on the President’s Cancer Panel.</p><p>Witte has been recognized throughout his career with numerous honors. He has received the Nakahara Memorial Lecture Prize, the Cotlove Lectureship from the Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists, the de Villiers International Achievement Award from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, the Warren Alpert Prize, and is elected member of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Microbiology.</p><p>Witte received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Cancer Research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. He joined the UCLA faculty in 1980.</p><p><a href="/Documents/15AM_Press_Registration_Form.pdf" target="_blank">Press registration</a> for the AACR Annual Meeting 2015 is free to qualified journalists and public information officers.</p><p><a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd" target="_blank"><img alt="#AACR15" src="/PublishingImages/Twitter-bird-blue-on-white_50x50.jpg" style="margin&#58;5px;" /></a>&#160;<a href="https&#58;//twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=%23AACR15&amp;src=typd" target="_blank">#AACR15</a></p></div>
Number of Childhood Cancer Survivors Increasing, Most Have Morbidities9979514/1/2015 1:21:58 PMhttp://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Lists/News Releases/AllItems.aspx682False2015-04-01T04:05:00Z<div class="ExternalClass498A9FF05B1D485E87125264C3E880D5"><p>PHILADELPHIA —The prevalence of childhood cancer survivors is estimated to have increased, and the majority of those who have survived five or more years beyond diagnosis may have at least one chronic health condition, according to a <a href="http&#58;//cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/24/4/653.abstract" target="_blank">study</a> published in <em>Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers &amp; Prevention</em>, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.</p><p>“We found that the estimated prevalence of childhood cancer survivors is increasing, as is the estimated morbidity prevalence in those five or more years beyond diagnosis. Therefore, this is a population experiencing co-occurring cancer treatment benefits and morbidity,” said <a href="http&#58;//www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/faculty-profiles/az/profile.html?xid=30044" target="_blank">Siobhan M. Phillips, PhD, MPH</a>, assistant professor of preventive medicine at <a href="http&#58;//www.northwestern.edu/" target="_blank">Northwestern University</a> Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.</p><p>Phillips and colleagues estimated the number of childhood cancer survivors in the United States to be 388,501, which is an increase of 59,849 from the previous estimate made in 2005 by a team from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Of these survivors, about 84 percent had survived five or more years post-diagnosis. </p><p>About 70 percent of the survivors of childhood cancers were estimated to have a mild or moderate chronic condition, and about 32 percent were estimated to have a severe, disabling, or life-threatening chronic condition. An estimated 35 percent of the survivors, ages 20 to 49, had neurocognitive dysfunction; about 13 to 17 percent of those in this age group had self-reported functional impairment, activity limitations, impaired mental health, pain, or anxiety/fear.</p><p>“Our study findings highlight that a singular focus on curing cancer yields an incomplete picture of childhood cancer survivorship,” added Phillips. “The burden of chronic conditions in this population is profound, both in occurrence and severity. Efforts to understand how to effectively decrease morbidity burden and incorporate effective care coordination and rehabilitation models to optimize longevity and well-being in this population should be a priority.”</p><p>The researchers used cancer incidence and survival data recorded between 1975 and 2011 from nine U.S. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries, and data from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort that had information on a range of potential adverse and late effects of cancer treatment from more than 14,000 long-term survivors of childhood cancers at 26 cancer centers across the United States and Canada. They first obtained estimates of the probability of each measure of morbidity from CCSS and then multiplied these estimates by the relevant number of survivors in the United States estimated from the SEER data.</p><p>“We know that many of these morbidities are at least somewhat modifiable in the general population. However, we don’t know if typical population guidelines for preventive behaviors apply to this group,” Phillips added. “We need to develop a better understanding of the multilevel factors including, but not limited to, physical activity, diet, and treatment characteristics, which influence childhood cancer survivors’ susceptibility to these morbidities in order to effectively prevent and delay their onset.”</p><p>This study was a collaboration among Northwestern University, the NCI, and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. </p><p>This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health. Phillips declares no conflicts of interest.</p></div>