In This Section

Program

Please note that this meeting will take place as an in-person event in Philadelphia and will not live-stream content for virtual participation. The meeting content will be recorded and made available as an on-demand program after the conference. Please see the REGISTRATION page for details. 

CME credit is available for in-person attendance for the designated sessions. On-demand presentations are not eligible for CME.

All presentations are scheduled to be live, in-person presentations at the date and time specified below unless noted otherwise.  Program is subject to change. 

*-Denotes Lightning Talk, Selected from Proffered Abstracts
[R]-Remote Presentation

Thursday, September 8

Welcome and Opening Lecture

Friday, September 9

Plenary Session 1: Pathology
Plenary Session 2: Artificial Intelligence
Plenary Session 3: Model Systems
Open Satellite Session: Updates from the Human Tumor Atlas Network and PRECISION Consortia

Saturday, September 10

Plenary Session 4: What is the role of our current surgical treatments?
Plenary Session 5: Imaging
Plenary Session 6: Controversies in Clinical Care (Debate Format)

Sunday, September 11

Plenary Session 7:  Molecular Sequencing
Plenary Session 8: Microenvironment

Thursday, September 8

CME Icon
Welcome and Opening Lecture
6:45 p.m.-7:30 p.m.

Welcome from Cochairs
Laura J. Esserman, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California

Opening Presentation
Angela M. Belcher, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Opening Reception
7:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

Friday, september 9

Breakfast
7-8 A.M. 
CME Icon
Plenary Session 1: Pathology
Session Chair: Jorge S. Reis-Filho, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 
8-10 A.M. 

DCIS: Pathological heterogeneity and prognosis definition [R]
Anne Vincent-Salomon, Institut Curie, Paris, France

Preinvasive breast lesions: an integrated pathology and genomics perspective
Jorge S. Reis-Filho, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 

How to solve the uncomfortable truth of DCIS?
Jelle Wesseling, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Spatial proximity between CD8 + T cells and tumor cells correlates with invasive recurrence in DCIS*
Michael Campbell, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

Genomic predictor can discriminate between high- and low-risk DCIS*
Elinor J. Sawyer, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom

Pioneering genetic rat models of Ductal Carcinoma in situ (DCIS)*
Catrin Lutz, Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Break
10–10:30 a.m.
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Plenary Session 2: Artificial Intelligence
Session Chair: Jorge S. Reis-Filho, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New york
10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m. 

Artificial intelligence for breast pathology: Challenges and opportunities (and more challenges!)
Michael G. Drage, PathAI, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts

Co-evolving artificial intelligence and pathology
Yinyin Yuan, Institute for Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom 

Radiogenomics for predicting underestimation of invasiveness in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) diagnosed with vacuum assisted breast biopsy: study rationale and design*
Matteo Lazzeroni, European Institute of Oncology IRCCS, Milan, Italy

Breast pathology and AI: Are we there yet? 
Matthew G. Hanna, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York  

Poster Session A/ Lunch (provided)
12:20–2 p.m. 
CME Icon
Plenary Session 3: Model Systems
Session Chair: Jos Jonkers, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2:15-4:45 P.M.

Mouse-INtraDuctal (MIND): An in vivo model for the discovery of epithelial/stromal cross talks that drive DCIS invasive and metastatic progression
Fariba Behbod, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas

Title to be announced
Senthil K. Muthuswamy, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts

Intraductal administration of a recombinant transferrin receptor-directed immunotoxin clears ductal carcinoma in situ in preclinical mammary in-duct (MIND) models of breast cancer*
Saraswati Sukumar, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

A living biobank of patient-derived ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) Mouse-INtraDuctal (MIND) xenografts identifies multiple risk factors of invasive progression*
Stefan Hutten, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Candidate antigens for a ductal carcinoma in situ vaccine, essential for breast cancer cell survival across multiple subtypes, are immunogenic in DCIS and IBC*
Sasha Stanton, Earle A. Chiles Research Institute, Portland, Oregon

Patient-derived and genetically engineered models of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ
Jos Jonkers, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Patient-derived organoids as models for breast cancer interception
Jennifer Rosenbluth, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

Break
4:45-5:15 P.M.
Open Satellite Session: Updates from the Human Tumor Atlas Network and PRECISION Consortia
Session Chairs: Robert West, Stanford University, Stanford, California and Jelle Wesseling, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
5:15-7:35 P.M.

Session 1: Spatial Genomics 
Moderators: Robert West, Stanford University, Stanford, California and Esther H. Lips, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

5:15-6:05 P.M.

Mammary epithelial architecture modulates field cancerization
Hendrik Messal, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

A single-cell and spatial investigation of tumor and TME for DCIS
Runmin Wei, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

Session 2: How Can We Optimize Risk Stratification Over Time for DCIS?
Moderator: Jelle Wesseling, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
6:05-7:20 P.M.

Artificial intelligence for TIL scoring (AI-TIL)
Yinyin Yuan, Institute for Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom

The DCIS: A biological challenge and clinical dilemma
Sudhir Srivastava, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland

Artificial Intelligence approaches to DCIS grading and recurrence prediction
Jonas Teuwen, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Managing large-scale consortia
Jelle Wesseling, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

saturday, September 10

Breakfast
7–8 A.M.
CME Icon
Plenary Session 4: What is the role of our current surgical treatments?
Session Chair: Alistair Thompson, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas
8-10 A.M.

Surgery for DCIS: If, what and when
Alistair Thompson, Dan L. Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

After DCIS surgery, what next? The prevention of future breast events
Seema A. Khan, Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

Duration of endocrine treatment for DCIS impacts second events: Insights from a large registry of cases at two academic medical centers*
Gillian Hirst, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

Breast Cancer (BC) risk reduction in young women with Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS)*
Megan Tesch, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

Challenges in conducting active surveillance for DCIS
Thomas Lynch, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina

Break
10-10:30AM
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Plenary Session 5: Imaging
Session Chair: Heather Greenwood, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
10:30 A.M.-12:40 P.M.

Imaging tools for DCIS: Past, present and future
Constance Lehman, Harvard University/Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts

MR Imaging of active surveillance of DCIS – What we have learned so far
Heather Greenwood, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California

Characterizing N-glycan profiles of DCIS progression using tissue imaging MALDI mass spectrometry*
Elizabeth Wallace, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

DCIS-associated myoepithelial cells drive tumor progressive inflammation through up-regulation of integrin αvβ6*
Michael Allen, Queen Mary University of London, Barts Cancer Institute, London, United Kingdom

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and MRI: Challenges translating MRI depiction of DCIS to improved clinical performance and future opportunities to optimize treatment
Habib Rahbar, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington

Image-based risk assessment
Regina Barzilay, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Lunch on own
12:40-2:30 P.M.
CME Icon
Plenary Session 6: Controversies in Clinical Care (debate format)  
Moderator: Laura J. Esserman, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California
2:30–4:30 p.m.  

DCIS should not be called cancer
Jennifer L. Marti, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York
DCIS or cancer? Why all the confusion?
Steven Narod, Women’s College Research Institute, Toronto, Canada
Discussion

It is time to rethink local therapy for DCIS–enhanced image guided radiation therapy
Nicolas D. Prionas, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
Bruce Mann, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Australia 
Discussion

POSTER SESSION B / RECEPTION
4:45-7 P.M.

Sunday, September 11

Breakfast
7-8 A.M.
CME Icon
Plenary Session 7:  Molecular Sequencing
Session Chair: Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
8-9:45 A.M.

Molecular subtypes and spatial heterogeneity in DCIS
Therese Sørlie, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway

Decoding DCIS progression & recurrence with single cell genomics
Nicholas E. Navin, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

Spatial ontologies for predicting invasive progression in ductal carcinoma in situ
R. Michael Angelo, Stanford University, Stanford, California

Break
9:45-10:15 A.M.
CME Icon
Plenary Session 8: Microenvironment
Session Chair: Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
10:15 A.M.-12:00 P.M.

What is an invasion permissive/promoting microenvironment? Clues for prevention
Alexander D. Borowsky, University of California-Davis, Davis, California

Compromised myoepithelial cell differentiation correlates with DCIS to IDC transition
Pepper Schedin, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon

DCIS to IDC progression – a key step of immune escape
Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

CME Icon
Closing Keynote
Session Chair: Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts
12:15-1 p.m.

The hitchhikers guide to the universe of DCIS
Laura J. Esserman, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California

Closing Remarks
1 P.M

Laura J. Esserman, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, California
Kornelia Polyak, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts